Pedroia Predictions

Humphrey

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Everyone seems to be on the same page w/regard to what he needs to do in order to play (that is, how many games a week he needs to be available for); don't think that was the case in other comeback attempts. So, yes, he's not hurting the team while attempting to achieve this.
 

amRadio

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Let him get back and try to get his career average back to .300 before laying it down. Not sure if he is up against any significant milestone or not.
 

geoduck no quahog

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Pedroia needs to think first and foremost about his long term health. No one wants to see him permanently hobbled by a bad knee in his 50’s. I obviously don’t know what the long term impact of his current condition is, or if stressing the joint makes that worse, but he should be listening to the doctors and thinking about playing whiffle ball with his grandkids unless there’s no downside to continued play.

Anyone know about these types of injuries?
 

IpswichSox

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Wonder if Pedroia would have mouthed what he said to Machado after Barnes stuck up for him if Pedroia knew that Machado had effectively wiped out nearly two years of playing time and possibly ended his career.
 

Red(s)HawksFan

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Wonder if Pedroia would have mouthed what he said to Machado after Barnes stuck up for him if Pedroia knew that Machado had effectively wiped out nearly two years of playing time and possibly ended his career.
So you think if he'd known his career was over, he'd have been more gung-ho about someone getting thrown at and potentially having his career ended? I have a hard time believing he's that much of a jackass.

For what it's worth...
 
Jul 5, 2018
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Wonder if Pedroia would have mouthed what he said to Machado after Barnes stuck up for him if Pedroia knew that Machado had effectively wiped out nearly two years of playing time and possibly ended his career.

I thought it was 20 years of wear and tear that caused Pedroia's problems. Is it a medical certainity that is was from the Machado play?
 

drleather2001

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So you think if he'd known his career was over, he'd have been more gung-ho about someone getting thrown at and potentially having his career ended? I have a hard time believing he's that much of a jackass.

For what it's worth...
Publicly throwing your coaches under the bus when they were ostensibly trying to stick up for you is not particularly admirable.
 

TheoShmeo

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Do we have to parse this?

Saying “it’s them, not me” is a douchey move, regardless of whether DP wanted them to do anything. I love me some Pedey and hate me some Machado, but that was a horrible look.

Also, unless and until Chavis slumps, the rookie is simply a better option than him, even after he is declared ready, if the objective is to win baseball games.
 

mauidano

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Do we have to parse this?

Saying “it’s them, not me” is a douchey move, regardless of whether DP wanted them to do anything. I love me some Pedey and hate me some Machado, but that was a horrible look.

Also, unless and until Chavis slumps, the rookie is simply a better option than him, even after he is declared ready, if the objective is to win baseball games.
Can’t believe we are STILL talking about Machado. Let it go people, it’s way in the past. No way Pedroia hits with any power as Chavis is at the moment. Team game; not about emotional feelings. Win games with the best 9.
 

mfried

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Can’t believe we are STILL talking about Machado. Let it go people, it’s way in the past. No way Pedroia hits with any power as Chavis is at the moment. Team game; not about emotional feelings. Win games with the best 9.
In the Cora spirit - play to the matchups and remember Pedey can play only 2nd base and DH, Chavis can play those two, 3rd and 1st. The choice will be Pedey vs. Nunez vs. Holt.
 

CoffeeNerdness

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Three singles in 16 ABs on this latest iteration of the comeback trail.

10/43 across all his MiLB ABs with one extra base hit- a double on April, 4th for Single A Greenville.
 

Murby

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Mar 16, 2006
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Can’t believe we are STILL talking about Machado. Let it go people, it’s way in the past. No way Pedroia hits with any power as Chavis is at the moment. Team game; not about emotional feelings. Win games with the best 9.
Nevermind, Machado got posterized of sorts in the last out to win the WS. That K will be played forever. Move along. Hope Pedroia sees the writing and hangs it up.
 

soxhop411

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Give Pedroia a lifetime contract and let him coach kids in the minors, like Pedro.

He won’t function without baseball in his life.
 

MyDaughterLovesTomGordon

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I saw him play in Portland two Thursdays ago. He’s a shell of himself. Looks tiny out there, like a batboy, and didn’t get the ball out of the infield.

Just doesn’t look dangerous in any way at the plate. And was playing DH for a very defensively challenged club that day.
 

Al Zarilla

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I saw him play in Portland two Thursdays ago. He’s a shell of himself. Looks tiny out there, like a batboy, and didn’t get the ball out of the infield.

Just doesn’t look dangerous in any way at the plate. And was playing DH for a very defensively challenged club that day.
You’re making me a sad panda, you know. But, I have to trust your report.
 

Byrdbrain

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Give Pedroia a lifetime contract and let him coach kids in the minors, like Pedro.

He won’t function without baseball in his life.
They can't just tear up his contract, he'll get paid the money he is owed in the amount of years it stipulates.
For this year we will likely keep seeing what we have been he'll rehab for a while then he'll have a "setback" to restart the clock. That is unless he physically can't get out there and in that case he'll go back on the IL.

If things aren't better next year they may have to release him but I doubt he retires and walks away from all that money. I sure as hell wouldn't.
 

NDame616

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I'm assuming at this point they are gonna "let him rest for a month" and move him to the 60 day DL when they need the roster spot, "let him rehab" for the last month of the season and inevitably in mid December he announces he's retiring from baseball which will be the PR move but they'll quietly release him and he will have his bobblehead day in April
 

CarolinaBeerGuy

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I'm assuming at this point they are gonna "let him rest for a month" and move him to the 60 day DL when they need the roster spot, "let him rehab" for the last month of the season and inevitably in mid December he announces he's retiring from baseball which will be the PR move but they'll quietly release him and he will have his bobblehead day in April
December 2021. He won’t retire with $25 million owed to him.
 

Byrdbrain

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What he is saying is they will come to an agreement where the team and player say he is retiring but in reality he will be released, in that situation he would collect all of his pay.

I could see something like that happening if this year continues as is has so far for him.
 

shaggydog2000

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There is definitely no way that Pedroia's cap money goes away. We have to accept that. There seems like a pretty good chance he never plays in the Majors again and in some phrasing retires after the season.
 

StuckOnYouk

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The guy has made over 100 million already, is there a way he and the team can find a way to split it down the middle while getting his salary off the books in some kind of wink wink move?
 

Mueller's Twin Grannies

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What he is saying is they will come to an agreement where the team and player say he is retiring but in reality he will be released, in that situation he would collect all of his pay.

I could see something like that happening if this year continues as is has so far for him.
The whole point of filing retirement paperwork is to start reaping the benefits, like the MLB pension, that come with it, right?

I don't know if the rules allow for a player to announce his retirement and then be released by the team so he can collect the remaining money owed to him. That seems a little fishy to me and would probably not be the greatest of looks, not to mention I could see the MLBPA having a problem with that sequence of events. Plus, the team has a interest in not paying him the remaining $25M if he's not going to ever be a productive player again. He was not a Dombrowski guy and Dombrowski runs the baseball ops, so he has no long-term relationship with Pedroia, meaning he has no real motivation beyond some kind of warped sense of "doing the right thing" for a player that hasn't been a meaningful contributor to the team in a couple of years, basically since he's been here. And that may be cold, but it's also reality and he has the dubious position of having to make that call.

The Red Sox lose nothing by allowing him to continue to try to rehab for as long as he wants, but if there's no light at the end of the tunnel after this season they're going to have to tell him it's time to sign the paperwork or they're going to have to let him go. The latter scenario means paying him the money so I think they want him to figure it out on his own. Two lost seasons (more if you count the time he lost when the injury first occurred) might be enough to convince him that it's time to do the honorable thing and not hold the organization up for money he's never going to truly earn.

Pedroia is stubborn enough to never want to admit defeat, though, so this has the potential to get ugly in a few months. Here's hoping it doesn't.
 

shaggydog2000

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The whole point of filing retirement paperwork is to start reaping the benefits, like the MLB pension, that come with it, right?

I don't know if the rules allow for a player to announce his retirement and then be released by the team so he can collect the remaining money owed to him. That seems a little fishy to me and would probably not be the greatest of looks, not to mention I could see the MLBPA having a problem with that sequence of events. Plus, the team has a interest in not paying him the remaining $25M if he's not going to ever be a productive player again. He was not a Dombrowski guy and Dombrowski runs the baseball ops, so he has no long-term relationship with Pedroia, meaning he has no real motivation beyond some kind of warped sense of "doing the right thing" for a player that hasn't been a meaningful contributor to the team in a couple of years, basically since he's been here. And that may be cold, but it's also reality and he has the dubious position of having to make that call.

The Red Sox lose nothing by allowing him to continue to try to rehab for as long as he wants, but if there's no light at the end of the tunnel after this season they're going to have to tell him it's time to sign the paperwork or they're going to have to let him go. The latter scenario means paying him the money so I think they want him to figure it out on his own. Two lost seasons (more if you count the time he lost when the injury first occurred) might be enough to convince him that it's time to do the honorable thing and not hold the organization up for money he's never going to truly earn.

Pedroia is stubborn enough to never want to admit defeat, though, so this has the potential to get ugly in a few months. Here's hoping it doesn't.
Guys get released and then retire all the time. The Sox aren't getting out of that cap hit.
 

joe dokes

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The whole point of filing retirement paperwork is to start reaping the benefits, like the MLB pension, that come with it, right?

I don't know if the rules allow for a player to announce his retirement and then be released by the team so he can collect the remaining money owed to him. That seems a little fishy to me and would probably not be the greatest of looks, not to mention I could see the MLBPA having a problem with that sequence of events. Plus, the team has a interest in not paying him the remaining $25M if he's not going to ever be a productive player again. He was not a Dombrowski guy and Dombrowski runs the baseball ops, so he has no long-term relationship with Pedroia, meaning he has no real motivation beyond some kind of warped sense of "doing the right thing" for a player that hasn't been a meaningful contributor to the team in a couple of years, basically since he's been here. And that may be cold, but it's also reality and he has the dubious position of having to make that call.

The Red Sox lose nothing by allowing him to continue to try to rehab for as long as he wants, but if there's no light at the end of the tunnel after this season they're going to have to tell him it's time to sign the paperwork or they're going to have to let him go. The latter scenario means paying him the money so I think they want him to figure it out on his own. Two lost seasons (more if you count the time he lost when the injury first occurred) might be enough to convince him that it's time to do the honorable thing and not hold the organization up for money he's never going to truly earn.

Pedroia is stubborn enough to never want to admit defeat, though, so this has the potential to get ugly in a few months. Here's hoping it doesn't.
There's no such thing as "announcing your retirement" that has a contractual significance. Either you file the paperwork or you don't.

That he's not a "dombrowski guy" has zero significance here. Dombrowski may, as some people seem to think, be the worst GM in history, but he's never shown himself to be either an idiot or an asshole.

Trying to "convince him" to walk away from his deal would be the latter. He "earned" every dime of it, by the warped way "has he earned it" is calculated in pro sports.

The "honorable thing."?! If those words come out of ANY mlb executive's mouth, their tongue should be cut out.
 

Byrdbrain

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The whole point of filing retirement paperwork is to start reaping the benefits, like the MLB pension, that come with it, right?

I don't know if the rules allow for a player to announce his retirement and then be released by the team so he can collect the remaining money owed to him. That seems a little fishy to me and would probably not be the greatest of looks, not to mention I could see the MLBPA having a problem with that sequence of events. Plus, the team has a interest in not paying him the remaining $25M if he's not going to ever be a productive player again. He was not a Dombrowski guy and Dombrowski runs the baseball ops, so he has no long-term relationship with Pedroia, meaning he has no real motivation beyond some kind of warped sense of "doing the right thing" for a player that hasn't been a meaningful contributor to the team in a couple of years, basically since he's been here. And that may be cold, but it's also reality and he has the dubious position of having to make that call.

The Red Sox lose nothing by allowing him to continue to try to rehab for as long as he wants, but if there's no light at the end of the tunnel after this season they're going to have to tell him it's time to sign the paperwork or they're going to have to let him go. The latter scenario means paying him the money so I think they want him to figure it out on his own. Two lost seasons (more if you count the time he lost when the injury first occurred) might be enough to convince him that it's time to do the honorable thing and not hold the organization up for money he's never going to truly earn.

Pedroia is stubborn enough to never want to admit defeat, though, so this has the potential to get ugly in a few months. Here's hoping it doesn't.
Fulfilling a contractual obligation per the mutually agreed upon CBA isn't a "warped sense of doing the right thing" nor is it "honorable" for Pedey to walk away from money he is owed.
 

richgedman'sghost

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What happened with David Wright? I think insurance is picking up most of his contract but I'm not sure if the Mets are penalized by having his contract still on their books.
Ps.. it's not the Red Sox "cap". There is no salary cap in baseball.
 

WestMassExpat

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The whole point of filing retirement paperwork is to start reaping the benefits, like the MLB pension, that come with it, right?

I don't know if the rules allow for a player to announce his retirement and then be released by the team so he can collect the remaining money owed to him. That seems a little fishy to me and would probably not be the greatest of looks, not to mention I could see the MLBPA having a problem with that sequence of events. Plus, the team has a interest in not paying him the remaining $25M if he's not going to ever be a productive player again. He was not a Dombrowski guy and Dombrowski runs the baseball ops, so he has no long-term relationship with Pedroia, meaning he has no real motivation beyond some kind of warped sense of "doing the right thing" for a player that hasn't been a meaningful contributor to the team in a couple of years, basically since he's been here. And that may be cold, but it's also reality and he has the dubious position of having to make that call.

The Red Sox lose nothing by allowing him to continue to try to rehab for as long as he wants, but if there's no light at the end of the tunnel after this season they're going to have to tell him it's time to sign the paperwork or they're going to have to let him go. The latter scenario means paying him the money so I think they want him to figure it out on his own. Two lost seasons (more if you count the time he lost when the injury first occurred) might be enough to convince him that it's time to do the honorable thing and not hold the organization up for money he's never going to truly earn.

Pedroia is stubborn enough to never want to admit defeat, though, so this has the potential to get ugly in a few months. Here's hoping it doesn't.
This post Is annoyingly misguided. If management doesn’t want to pay the man his money, they should switch to the NFL or pro lacrosse or whatever sport doesn’t offer guaranteed contracts. As long as MiLB players make school bus driver wages, and we’re within 100 years of the reserve clause, I have full sympathy with the players, as rich as the richest might be.
 

sean1562

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i know this has been talked about ad nauseam, but any talk of Pedroia doing "the honorable thing" in order to save a literal billionaire a couple million dollars is ridiculous. His contract, when signed, was a pretty team friendly deal and they can't just bully him into retirement to save a few dollars. If they don't want him on the roster they can release him. I'd rather Dustin Pedroia have that money than John Henry. We have wasted millions of dollars over the last few years on garbage players and been fine, Pedroia's 25 mil over the next two seasons isnt going to doom this team
 

mauidano

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i know this has been talked about ad nauseam, but any talk of Pedroia doing "the honorable thing" in order to save a literal billionaire a couple million dollars is ridiculous. His contract, when signed, was a pretty team friendly deal and they can't just bully him into retirement to save a few dollars. If they don't want him on the roster they can release him. I'd rather Dustin Pedroia have that money than John Henry. We have wasted millions of dollars over the last few years on garbage players and been fine, Pedroia's 25 mil over the next two seasons isnt going to doom this team
This exactly. End of discussion.
 

Sandy Leon Trotsky

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This post Is annoyingly misguided. If management doesn’t want to pay the man his money, they should switch to the NFL or pro lacrosse or whatever sport doesn’t offer guaranteed contracts. As long as MiLB players make school bus driver wages, and we’re within 100 years of the reserve clause, I have full sympathy with the players, as rich as the richest might be.
While I agree..... a minor league player does not make “school bus driver wages”. There’s an insane amount of cash per year.... benefits..... in between those two salaries. Minor league players are still making more than most of population.
 

shaggydog2000

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While I agree..... a minor league player does not make “school bus driver wages”. There’s an insane amount of cash per year.... benefits..... in between those two salaries. Minor league players are still making more than most of population.
Minor league players on their first contract that have made the 40 man roster get paid a minimum of $44,500. Players on their second year in the minors on the 40 man make 89k. Minor league free agents can make even more. But that is not a large percentage of the total number of minor league players. Including those players, the average income for a AAA player is 10k/month, but the minimum is $2150. Plus per diem. And you're not in the players union until you're on the 40 man roster either. So the majority of players in AAA are making the equivalent of 15k a year. And it only goes down from there as you go to the lower levels.

https://www.post-gazette.com/sports/pirates/2018/07/09/minor-league-wages-lawsuit-mlb-pirates-altoona-curve/stories/201807050008

I don't know what you consider the benefits to be, other than limited health care, post game spreads that are mostly a jar of peanut butter and a loaf of bread for an entire team, and being able to pick up hooters waitresses by telling them you're a pro athlete, because minor leaguers don't get pensions, 401ks, housing allowances, company cars, or anything else like that.
 

MyDaughterLovesTomGordon

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And school bus drivers do pretty decent nowadays. It’s a hard position to fill - CDL, annoying kids, weird hours, etc.

Many get $19-20 an hour or more, plus good health plan and 403b.
 

Sandy Leon Trotsky

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Super Mea Culpa! Fuck! I looked up this after posting..... I’m stuck on somewhere thinking it’s $600K per minimum.

Research pre-post!!!!
 

Byrdbrain

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It's borderline criminal how little minor league ballplayers are paid. A small percentage got big singing bonuses but most didn't.
There are threads around here discussing it and a number of articles out there.
 

Pandarama

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It's borderline criminal how little minor league ballplayers are paid. A small percentage got big singing bonuses but most didn't.
There are threads around here discussing it and a number of articles out there.
A small percentage are projected to be future MLB players (highly correlated with what round they signed in), but those prospects need 8 other guys on the field with them in order to play a minor league game.

In Casey Stengal's words, "You have to have a catcher because if you don't you're likely to have a lot of passed balls." But that doesn't mean you have to pay the catcher a living wage if he'll work for less.