Red Sox acquire Adam Ottavino and RHP prospect Frank German from Yankees for PTBNL

Spelunker

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SoSH Member
Jul 17, 2005
12,623
It entered my family's lexicon via Jesse Pinkman of "Breaking Bad," where I don't recall him using it in a gender-specific way at all. But it's been a few years.
It's very nature is gender specific. It's more insulting to use it as a pejorative towards men, because of what it's implying is an insult.
 

1974pawsox

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Nov 3, 2005
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Northern Virginia
It's very nature is gender specific. It's more insulting to use it as a pejorative towards men, because of what it's implying is an insult.
But words change over time. And when words change through the evolving of their usage patterns, their nature can change too, no?

To my ear, the word is changing to become usable as a general expletive, without gender implication, and often with no real context, just a verbal sputter of anger, although I'll grant you that there are plenty of persistent examples to the contrary too.

I can say that the women in my life aren't insulted by this word and, in fact, use it a lot as a pure expletive. And didn't pick it up from me. (Maybe from Aaron Paul?)

Anyway, no one joined this board to debate these sort of things, or read my comments on them, and so I'll have nothing further to say on the matter. Carry on ...