Terry Coming Up Rozes

lovegtm

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Couldn't find one discussing him, and as he's been improving his game a lot this season, there are a lot of questions that are going to come up.

The main one for me is: if Terry keeps this up, he is going to get paid in 2019, and I don't really see how the Celtics do that without going heavily into the luxury tax. Obviously this is a really good problem to have, but how do you see Ainge approaching the situation?
 

BigSoxFan

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Couldn't find one discussing him, and as he's been improving his game a lot this season, there are a lot of questions that are going to come up.

The main one for me is: if Terry keeps this up, he is going to get paid in 2019, and I don't really see how the Celtics do that without going heavily into the luxury tax. Obviously this is a really good problem to have, but how do you see Ainge approaching the situation?
I think he’ll play the wait-and-see approach with Rozier. The improvements have been encouraging and he may be needed to step up as top guard off bench if Smart gets too pricey this offseason.
 

lovegtm

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I think he’ll play the wait-and-see approach with Rozier. The improvements have been encouraging and he may be needed to step up as top guard off bench if Smart gets too pricey this offseason.
Yeah, that's very likely how they see his value, but the issue comes if he in turn becomes a really valuable asset. I doubt they'd want to see two quality guards walk for nothing two years in a row (if Marcus leaves).

The other scenario is the one where Marcus keeps shooting around 30% from 3, doesn't get any worthwhile offers in RFA, and comes back to the Celtics on a cheap long-term deal or for the qualifying offer. In that case, they'd really need to look at trading Rozier if he was looking expensive.

In terms of luxury tax, I'm guessing Wyc will go there for all-star caliber players, but not for 5th or 6th guys, so shit is going to get real pretty fast.
 

BigSoxFan

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Yeah, that's very likely how they see his value, but the issue comes if he in turn becomes a really valuable asset. I doubt they'd want to see two quality guards walk for nothing two years in a row (if Marcus leaves).

The other scenario is the one where Marcus keeps shooting around 30% from 3, doesn't get any worthwhile offers in RFA, and comes back to the Celtics on a cheap long-term deal or for the qualifying offer. In that case, they'd really need to look at trading Rozier if he was looking expensive.

In terms of luxury tax, I'm guessing Wyc will go there for all-star caliber players, but not for 5th or 6th guys, so shit is going to get real pretty fast.
Think the draft could also play a role in this. If the Lakers pick conveys at, say, 4 or 5, Ainge may prefer Trae Young to a guy like Porter or Bamba, which would make Rozier a potential trade candidate this summer.

Real question I have is whether or not Rozier ever improves enough for another team to throw starter money at him.
 

bosox79

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How much do players like Rozier get paid? He is working himself into an instant offense type of player off the bench and plays good D but the league isn't exactly short of those type of players. His lack of play making ability really hurts his value too, given his height.

I can't see anyone throwing starter money at him. It seems like every team already has something resembling a Terry Rozier.

I say this as someone who is high on Terry Rozier and prefer him over Smart if the team had to pick. I think he fits the team better with a healthy Hayward.
 

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His development has been interesting to watch, and his particular combination of strengths and weaknesses is... peculiar.

He looks to me as if he's going to be a streaky offense kind of guy; for now I am more inclined to view him as "on a hot streak" than having found a newfound level that he will sustain. But really it is both because the run he's on now is better than any of his previous streaks.

He's improved his ability to finish at the rim which will be HUGE for him, but he still cannot throw a lob pass to save his life (although he did throw a nice one to Tatum the other day, the first good lob of his I've seen). In the playoffs last year was it him or Smart (who actually does throw a nice lob) who threw what was supposed to be a lob to Jaylen Brown that Brown managed to catch at his waist and somehow lay in?

Pros: Athleticism, rebounding, defense, developing shot (from distance and close in)

Cons: Streakiness, not really a PG

He's a good fit on this rebounding-challenged Celtic team that doesn't rely on a Rondo-type PG.
 

ishmael

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His development has been interesting to watch, and his particular combination of strengths and weaknesses is... peculiar.

He looks to me as if he's going to be a streaky offense kind of guy; for now I am more inclined to view him as "on a hot streak" than having found a newfound level that he will sustain. But really it is both because the run he's on now is better than any of his previous streaks.

He's improved his ability to finish at the rim which will be HUGE for him, but he still cannot throw a lob pass to save his life (although he did throw a nice one to Tatum the other day, the first good lob of his I've seen). In the playoffs last year was it him or Smart (who actually does throw a nice lob) who threw what was supposed to be a lob to Jaylen Brown that Brown managed to catch at his waist and somehow lay in?

Pros: Athleticism, rebounding, defense, developing shot (from distance and close in)

Cons: Streakiness, not really a PG

He's a good fit on this rebounding-challenged Celtic team that doesn't rely on a Rondo-type PG.
If the shooting improvement is real, he is pushing into poor man's Jamal Crawford territory on Offense. Combine that with solid man+team defense and you have a player who could be the first guard off the bench on a good team.

How do people feel he does when switched onto 2s and 3s? I know it doesn't happen a ton right now (b/c he is often on the court with Marcus), but that could make him considerably more valuable as a true swing guard, rather than just backup 1.
 

finnVT

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I think he's showing nice improvement, but I'm not sure he's necessarily pricing himself out just yet. To me, he's doing something along the lines of what Patrick Beverly, Ben McLemore, or even Avery Bradley did on their rookie deals. Those guys were all in the 5-8mil range per year when signing their second deals, and that still feels about right to me on Rozier, or a bit higher to account for the higher payroll caps now. I'm not sure I see a great precedent in recent years for 10m+. Caldwell-Pope maybe, but that was a weird 1-year deal situation. Dion Waiters is maybe the high end of the expectation, but he had more years of higher production, and still just ended up in the 11-12m range.

If Rozier is in the 8-10m, I would think the C's could keep him if they wanted (though probably wouldn't if they keep Smart).
 

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I think he's showing nice improvement, but I'm not sure he's necessarily pricing himself out just yet. To me, he's doing something along the lines of what Patrick Beverly, Ben McLemore, or even Avery Bradley did on their rookie deals. Those guys were all in the 5-8mil range per year when signing their second deals, and that still feels about right to me on Rozier, or a bit higher to account for the higher payroll caps now. I'm not sure I see a great precedent in recent years for 10m+. Caldwell-Pope maybe, but that was a weird 1-year deal situation. Dion Waiters is maybe the high end of the expectation, but he had more years of higher production, and still just ended up in the 11-12m range.

If Rozier is in the 8-10m, I would think the C's could keep him if they wanted (though probably wouldn't if they keep Smart).
The 5-8m for Beverly, McLemore, or Bradley on their second deal is todays 9-12m. I've always been a big believer in Rozier as a quality NBA player but there isn't a need to be paying that to Kyrie's backup when you can fill those second unit minutes on a rookie deal with a cheaper veteran guy at a prove-it-to-me stage of his career......kinda like how Ainge found Posey and Eddie House on the cheap.

Yes, I'll go back to Ainge preferring cheap veteran value deals or a rookie contract guy on his second units rather than paying fair market value.
 

Manzivino

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Over his last 31 games Rozier's shooting 40.8% from 3 on 4.2 attempts per game. If that improvement is legit, then yes he's basically Avery Bradley, just 4 years younger. He doesn't quite make Smart expendable by himself because he can't be the primary initiator on offense, but it's close. It's entirely possible that he prices himself out of the Celtics plans. As with Smart, I think it's more likely they extend him and then trade him rather than let him walk for nothing; I just can't see Ainge being satisfied continually developing first rounders into solid NBA players and getting nothing for them after their rookie deal, that's not optimal asset management.

I do recognize your position HRB, although I disagree with it. I think a great deal depends on how the stash of draft picks pans out. They have as many as 5 draft picks coming in the next 2 years with 2 of them being lottery picks, if one of those turns into a legit rotation guard then that changes the calculus on Rozier. Hell, they could end up having Doncic fall into their laps if a team prefers Ayton/Bagley and all of this discussion evaporates in a cloud of champagne spray.
 

lovegtm

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The 5-8m for Beverly, McLemore, or Bradley on their second deal is todays 9-12m. I've always been a big believer in Rozier as a quality NBA player but there isn't a need to be paying that to Kyrie's backup when you can fill those second unit minutes on a rookie deal with a cheaper veteran guy at a prove-it-to-me stage of his career......kinda like how Ainge found Posey and Eddie House on the cheap.

Yes, I'll go back to Ainge preferring cheap veteran value deals or a rookie contract guy on his second units rather than paying fair market value.
I agree with pretty much every word of this, which brings us back to my initial question: what can the team get for a Rozier who shows in the next 41 games that this improvement is real?

As far as guardings 2s/3s, he's long for his height, and doesn't seem to have much issue guarding 2s. 3s are a bit of a stretch, but he can hold his own on switches without it being a crisis for the defense. I like him on 2s a lot more than I liked Avery on them.
 

Fishy1

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The idea that this might just be a hot streak from Rozier seems shaky: his usage is way up, and he's shooting 40% now.

But the improvement is almost entirely from three point land. He's shaky at the rim - 50% - which is a marginal improvement over last year's 47%.
 

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First career start, finishing with a triple double filling in for Kyrie. Always fun to watch the young guns progress and Rozier is turning into a nice player.
 

slamminsammya

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Despite being shifty and a generally good ball handler, Rozier is not good at getting himself angles at the rim. I think that accounts for the poor shooting from close. Those shots are almost always contested.
 

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NBA's all time leader in percentage of games started with a triple double.
 

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Great to re-read the observations from earlier this year where a couple knocks were his play making ability and his lob pass. I'd say his play making was on display last night, consistently finding good looks for his teammates and even had a nice touch on the 'oops to Theis. He was beyond amped for his first start, so I wouldn't expect this to be a reasonable baseline for him going forward (duh), but you can't help but be encouraged by his play in all phases last night. Scary Terry, bitch, indeed.
 

wade boggs chicken dinner

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NBA's all time leader in percentage of games started with a triple double.
Kyrie: 429 career starts, 1 triple double.

Without looking it up, can anyone else guess the only other player who recorded a triple double in his first NBA start since the NBA has been keeping that stat? I couldn't.

(hint: it was 2013 and player played for 76ers).
 
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wade boggs chicken dinner

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And Rozier deserves a highlight package! Note that JB's dunk started when Rozier boxed out Kanter (was he the only Cs player to box out Kanter all night) and gathered the rebound to start the fast break.

 

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Despite being shifty and a generally good ball handler, Rozier is not good at getting himself angles at the rim. I think that accounts for the poor shooting from close. Those shots are almost always contested.
I would say this is/was true of Jaylen (more so last year) Smart, Bradley when here. Straight question for the hoops coaches and players - other than reps or experience can -"finishing at the rim" be taught? Are there practice drills or something a coach can use to develop the skill? Just curious, I see Tatum using the euro step to change angles or go around a defender - what else can be taught?

Edit: I see Kyrie has spent hours upon hours using angles, english, banks, etc developing his finishing skills - my question is how someone already in the NBA can improve the skill.
 
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HomeRunBaker

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I would say this is/was true of Jaylen (more so last year) Smart, Bradley when here. Straight question for the hoops coaches and players - other than reps or experience can -"finishing at the rim" be taught? Are there practice drills or something a coach can use to develop the skill? Just curious, I see Tatum using the euro step to change angles or go around a defender - what else can be taught?

Edit: I see Kyrie has spent hours upon hours using angles, english, banks, etc developing his finishing skills - my question is how someone already in the NBA can improve the skill.
One thing to recognize is pure natural scoring ability......or simply, talent. Kyrie has always had these skills and of course can improve but he has had a much higher baseline for "finishing" than say an Avery who has always struggled with this primarily due to his size. Tatum is so long he has an inherent advantage over Rozier/Avery.

I think it is like many other athletic skills on a basketball court......you can improve but your ceiling is going to be limited based on your length and athleticism. Isaiah is a perfect example. He's a natural scorer much like Kyrie but when he loses a little athleticism/quickness/explosion it is really a struggle for him to finish at the rim.
 

RetractableRoof

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One thing to recognize is pure natural scoring ability......or simply, talent. Kyrie has always had these skills and of course can improve but he has had a much higher baseline for "finishing" than say an Avery who has always struggled with this primarily due to his size. Tatum is so long he has an inherent advantage over Rozier/Avery.

I think it is like many other athletic skills on a basketball court......you can improve but your ceiling is going to be limited based on your length and athleticism. Isaiah is a perfect example. He's a natural scorer much like Kyrie but when he loses a little athleticism/quickness/explosion it is really a struggle for him to finish at the rim.
Thank you. Agreed - I would just say as much natural ability as Kyrie has, I recognize an awful lot if hard work occurred as well to polish that natural ability.

Dante is an OL coach and by most accounts is good at. There are all kinds of angles, leverage, multiple attackers and assorted variables that are being taught to the linemen. The same is true in martial arts. Some pick it up easily - some through perseverance. Surely there are ways to teach NBA finishing using angles, using the body to shield the ball, various footwork, etc. to get the most of their athleticism? I'd love to see any drills that are being used.
 

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The two best basketball players Ive ever seen at manipulating angles and little pockets of space are Kyrie and Steve Nash. Neither of them are athletic for the NBA. Its just a sixth sense some guys have.
 

HomeRunBaker

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Thank you. Agreed - I would just say as much natural ability as Kyrie has, I recognize an awful lot if hard work occurred as well to polish that natural ability.
Oh absolutely especially at this level. I was not discounting his work ethic at all.

Dante is an OL coach and by most accounts is good at. There are all kinds of angles, leverage, multiple attackers and assorted variables that are being taught to the linemen. The same is true in martial arts. Some pick it up easily - some through perseverance. Surely there are ways to teach NBA finishing using angles, using the body to shield the ball, various footwork, etc. to get the most of their athleticism? I'd love to see any drills that are being used.
When I played in college we'd have two bigs on the block with brooms in the air. Coach would have us form two lines at the wings and we'd take turns at each defender (to save time from chasing balls, resetting, etc) using dribble penetration to score at the rim around the brooms.
 

lexrageorge

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At 23, Rozier still has plenty of opportunity to improve upon some of his weaker areas (shooting angles being one). He's already improved leaps and bounds beyond where he was when he arrived, and that does not include last night's game.

Still, there will be a ceiling; it's certainly quite a bit lower than Kyrie's. I'm with those that are anticipating that Rozier is currently being eyed as the Marcus Smart replacement for next season, assuming Smart moves on.
 

wade boggs chicken dinner

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Surely there are ways to teach NBA finishing using angles, using the body to shield the ball, various footwork, etc. to get the most of their athleticism? I'd love to see any drills that are being used.
It's unbelievable how much stuff there is on the web. First result is below but there's a ton more stuff on finishing.

College coaches sometimes use brooms or other props to simulate the physicality and approach necessary to improve finishing at the rim.

At the NBA level, most of it is strength and balance. People who go to the rim are going to be hit by one, two, or three of the strongest people on the planet. Question is what happens after that. That's one reason why JB is so impressive - he regularly finishes through contact (unlike both Rozier and Tatum).

 

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Oh absolutely especially at this level. I was not discounting his work ethic at all.

When I played in college we'd have two bigs on the block with brooms in the air. Coach would have us form two lines at the wings and we'd take turns at each defender (to save time from chasing balls, resetting, etc) using dribble penetration to score at the rim around the brooms.
OK, this makes sense - and I can see derivatives of how to use it to 'surprise the driving player" to force him to react etc. Sort of like at the football combine they make the ball carrier/route runner react directionally to input. I get this.

It's unbelievable how much stuff there is on the web. First result is below but there's a ton more stuff on finishing.

College coaches sometimes use brooms or other props to simulate the physicality and approach necessary to improve finishing at the rim.

At the NBA level, most of it is strength and balance. People who go to the rim are going to be hit by one, two, or three of the strongest people on the planet. Question is what happens after that. That's one reason why JB is so impressive - he regularly finishes through contact (unlike both Rozier and Tatum).
I did google (but after posing the question). I will watch the link you provided, and some others. Edit: I did watch that video - and it is "finishing at the rim". I guess more accurately I am looking for "finishing at the rim in traffic". I can't imagine any guard/wing in the NBA can't finish in general - but when 2-3 defenders are looming is where it gets hairy. I'm still looking.

Strength and balance are clearly a part of the core finishing foundation - which makes sense as players improve at finishing and other skills as they grow into and improve their NBA bodies.

I guess as much as anything I like learning/being exposed to how higher end athletes improve their craft - beyond physical development, i.e. more than just another creative set of plyometrics or the like. I appreciate both your answers.
 
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TheRooster

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There is another, perhaps obvious way to improve. Keep attacking the rim during NBA games. If you think about "getting reps" it is nearly impossible to simulate NBA defenders. Guys like Brown and Rozier ought to improve a lot at finishing in traffic over 3-4 years in the league if their coach/team is willing to live through the learning.
 

phenweigh

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When I think of a guy who knew how to use leverage and angles to get his shot off amongst the bigs, I think of Bernard King. But that's probably different than what is being asked about TR, which is finishing at the rim while slashing to the hoop.
 

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Kyrie: 429 career starts, 1 triple double.

Without looking it up, can anyone else guess the only other player who recorded a triple double in his first NBA start since the NBA has been keeping that stat? I couldn't.

(hint: it was 2013 and player played for 76ers).
He would be below Tom Brady on a list of guesses.
 

bosox79

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Only player it could be is MCW. The 2013 thing gave it away.

Edit: I guess not. In his first game, he only had 22 points, 12 assists, 7 rebounds and 9 STEALS.
 

bosox79

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Oscar Robertson's first game as a pro he had 21 points, 10 rebounds and 11 assists though. I'm not sure when the triple double officially became a stat.
 

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OK, this makes sense - and I can see derivatives of how to use it to 'surprise the driving player" to force him to react etc. Sort of like at the football combine they make the ball carrier/route runner react directionally to input. I get this.
Funny how the brain works this was so long ago. The defenders would begin at the elbow extended and not allowed to retreat/back peddle until penetrator began his move so he could beat the awkward big carrying a large broom. The defender would end up near the low block by the time the shot went up. Wanted to paint a more clear picture.
 

RetractableRoof

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There is another, perhaps obvious way to improve. Keep attacking the rim during NBA games. If you think about "getting reps" it is nearly impossible to simulate NBA defenders. Guys like Brown and Rozier ought to improve a lot at finishing in traffic over 3-4 years in the league if their coach/team is willing to live through the learning.
Regarding reps: does it make sense that a player who faces more aggressive defensive teammates (blockers in this case) in practice will improve faster than a team that doesn't emphasize this? To be clear, will rookie X improve finishing at the rim faster facing someone like Jordan Bell in practice versus say the Celtics bigs (who are capable of blocking, but don't seem to live and die with it)?

I wonder if Celtics players may not have as many 'live reps' driving at the rim if Stevens is asking them to play within the confines of the system. Someone on a non-winning team may be given more of a green light to just attack the rim whenever they think it is open.
 

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I remember that when Rozier was drafted, his profiles highlighted "acrobatic finishes at the rim". His finishes certainly have a high degree of difficulty, and he'd be better if sometimes he'd dump the ball off to a nearby big, but I think his finishes aren't so awful as they've been painted.

The flood challenges are immense indeed.
Floods are easier to navigate when you're 7 feet tall.
 

Imbricus

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Smart or Rozier? Who has the higher ceiling? Who would be better to sign to a long-term contract, all else being equal? I'm leaning toward Rozier having the higher ceiling -- if he can get his body a bit better under control near the rim, why couldn't he be a really good finisher? Whereas with Smart, I think the best he'll do is improve his accuracy on short jumpers in the paint. Right now Rozier has the decided edge in shooting too (.391 FG vs. .357, and .357 3P vs. .299). If I had a choice, I think I'd lock Rozier up this off season with a long-term contract and let Smart walk if I had to. (Only problem: Rozier wants to start, and that role doesn't look available).

Still, "all else" won't be equal and I'm sure Danny will have a lot of ancillary considerations to look at in his final calculus. It would be a shame if he lost both of them though.
 

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Smart or Rozier? Who has the higher ceiling? Who would be better to sign to a long-term contract, all else being equal? I'm leaning toward Rozier having the higher ceiling -- if he can get his body a bit better under control near the rim, why couldn't he be a really good finisher? Whereas with Smart, I think the best he'll do is improve his accuracy on short jumpers in the paint. Right now Rozier has the decided edge in shooting too (.391 FG vs. .357, and .357 3P vs. .299). If I had a choice, I think I'd lock Rozier up this off season with a long-term contract and let Smart walk if I had to. (Only problem: Rozier wants to start, and that role doesn't look available).

Still, "all else" won't be equal and I'm sure Danny will have a lot of ancillary considerations to look at in his final calculus. It would be a shame if he lost both of them though.
It is a difficult choice, because both players are so unique. Both are the same age even though Marcus has more NBA experience.

Triple double aside, Rozier is a 6'1" not-really-point guard (a dying breed in today's NBA), erratic shooter, but he brings a level of athleticism that surpasses 99% of players in that genre. And more than just athleticism - I think there's plenty of skill involved in hauling down the number of rebounds he gets as a 6'1". If he leaves Boston, his natural fit would be with a team with a taller PG or one that doesn't depend on a PG to run the offense. Philly with Simmons, wherever Lebron goes, the Rockets with Harden, etc.

Smart is harder to peg, because he his set of skills and weaknesses is even weirder. His PG skills have progressed since his rookie year, while most of the rest of his offensive game hasn't. On defense, he brings a ton more value, including the ability to match up with a wider range of players than one would expect, although I don't necessarily think he's a great 1-on-1 defender against some of the elite PG types (ie, Kyrie).

I could see Rozier being more of a trade asset this offseason because of the extra year before he hits FA.

I think Ainge's approach here should be to let the market dictate what he does. This offseason, Smart hits RFA and Rozier has one more year before RFA. Smart either gets a long-term deal, from Boston or elsewhere, or takes a 1-year RFA deal that is his bridge to UFA. Ainge's move here, I think, is to let him test the market, and to have a specific dollar figure in mind that he won't exceed on a long-term deal. If Smart doesn't hit that target in RFA, then I think Ainge can be open to either approach: long-term deal with Smart at his preferred price... or 1-year bridge deal.

The approach to Rozier will be similar (have a dollar figure in mind and then go through the same process as with Smart) but may depend on how the Smart situation shakes out (and the Kyrie situation also). If Kyrie and Smart re-sign, the openness to moving Rozier or letting him go will be greater, obviously.
 

Imbricus

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Triple double aside, Rozier is a 6'1" not-really-point guard (a dying breed in today's NBA)
Good point about the height. That's a matchup issue, and with the NBA moving toward 6-6, even 6-10 guards, that's a problem. On the not really being a point guard, you're referring to the low assists etc.? His handle looks pretty good, but yeah, he's not really a facilitator on offense. I think you're right on Ainge. He probably will let the market drive his decision, and try not to get suckered into a bad contract for either one.
 

bosox79

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Smart wasn't much of a PG when he first joined the league either so maybe Rozier can develop that part of his game a little more. If he could be relied upon to be the backup PG, he is the obvious choice over Smart. That's a big if, though. Chances are he's more like Avery Bradley.
 

wade boggs chicken dinner

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It is a difficult choice, because both players are so unique. Both are the same age even though Marcus has more NBA experience.

Triple double aside, Rozier is a 6'1" not-really-point guard (a dying breed in today's NBA), erratic shooter, but he brings a level of athleticism that surpasses 99% of players in that genre. And more than just athleticism - I think there's plenty of skill involved in hauling down the number of rebounds he gets as a 6'1". If he leaves Boston, his natural fit would be with a team with a taller PG or one that doesn't depend on a PG to run the offense. Philly with Simmons, wherever Lebron goes, the Rockets with Harden, etc.

Smart is harder to peg, because he his set of skills and weaknesses is even weirder. His PG skills have progressed since his rookie year, while most of the rest of his offensive game hasn't. On defense, he brings a ton more value, including the ability to match up with a wider range of players than one would expect, although I don't necessarily think he's a great 1-on-1 defender against some of the elite PG types (ie, Kyrie).

I could see Rozier being more of a trade asset this offseason because of the extra year before he hits FA.

I think Ainge's approach here should be to let the market dictate what he does. This offseason, Smart hits RFA and Rozier has one more year before RFA. Smart either gets a long-term deal, from Boston or elsewhere, or takes a 1-year RFA deal that is his bridge to UFA. Ainge's move here, I think, is to let him test the market, and to have a specific dollar figure in mind that he won't exceed on a long-term deal. If Smart doesn't hit that target in RFA, then I think Ainge can be open to either approach: long-term deal with Smart at his preferred price... or 1-year bridge deal.

The approach to Rozier will be similar (have a dollar figure in mind and then go through the same process as with Smart) but may depend on how the Smart situation shakes out (and the Kyrie situation also). If Kyrie and Smart re-sign, the openness to moving Rozier or letting him go will be greater, obviously.
Agree with most of what you say but Rozier looks to need the ball in his hands to have any value. It's really going to be a problem for any team that wants him to start. So PHI would not be a good fit for him - while he stands in the corner and watches Simmons and Embiid play two-man games.

Also, as the game v GS showed, his size is an issue on defense. While he is a willing and tenacious defender, Curry just shot right over him.