Steep Couloirs and Flatspin 360s - Skiing and Boarding 22-23

Zososoxfan

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Jul 30, 2009
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South of North
Does anyone know Steamboat well? I'm trying to determine if there are any condos available that would be walkable to ski school for kiddos. I found some listings at the Torian Plum complexes and a couple others to the South (e.g., Ptarmigan House) but I can't tell if it's what I'm looking for. TIA.
 

Rook05

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Jul 18, 2005
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Sticker of the year at the base of Pano chair at Winter Park:

“Joe Buck is a Level II skier”
 

Hildy

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Does anyone know Steamboat well? I'm trying to determine if there are any condos available that would be walkable to ski school for kiddos. I found some listings at the Torian Plum complexes and a couple others to the South (e.g., Ptarmigan House) but I can't tell if it's what I'm looking for. TIA.
We skied there last winter—stayed at the Trailhead Lodge, which is really condos. Gondola to the base village was right outside. Hugely convenient!
 

GoJeff!

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May 30, 2007
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Headed out with a buddy on Friday to tour out of Convict Lake near Mammoth. We switched objectives at the last minute and headed up the east side of Mount Morrison, which is a great peak with a ton of interesting options on the way down.

As we're climbing, another skier came up from our right and started setting a bootpack just ahead of us. When we summited, we realized the other skier was the gentleman on the left here:

63904

If you can't tell because of the hat, that's mohawked pro legend Glen Plake. We sat with him for an hour up top while the corn softened up, and we must have said the right things, because he invited us to head down with him:

63905

Skied the east face and then Morrison Col, which has some amazing views:

63906


Glen was great, telling stories, pointing out other great lines we could hit and suggesting we meet up again in May for some south Sierra trips. Uh, yes please.
 

jezza1918

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Jul 19, 2005
2,945
South Dartmouth, MA
Headed out with a buddy on Friday to tour out of Convict Lake near Mammoth. We switched objectives at the last minute and headed up the east side of Mount Morrison, which is a great peak with a ton of interesting options on the way down.

As we're climbing, another skier came up from our right and started setting a bootpack just ahead of us. When we summited, we realized the other skier was the gentleman on the left here:

View attachment 63904

If you can't tell because of the hat, that's mohawked pro legend Glen Plake. We sat with him for an hour up top while the corn softened up, and we must have said the right things, because he invited us to head down with him:

View attachment 63905

Skied the east face and then Morrison Col, which has some amazing views:

View attachment 63906


Glen was great, telling stories, pointing out other great lines we could hit and suggesting we meet up again in May for some south Sierra trips. Uh, yes please.
Holy sh*t. That's all I got.
 

bigq

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Jul 15, 2005
11,666
Great stuff @GoJeff! What a fantastic day.

Plake is a legend. Hard to believe that Maltese Flamingo came out 37 years ago.
 

petefungtorres

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Jul 31, 2006
760
Portland, ME
Headed out with a buddy on Friday to tour out of Convict Lake near Mammoth. We switched objectives at the last minute and headed up the east side of Mount Morrison, which is a great peak with a ton of interesting options on the way down.

As we're climbing, another skier came up from our right and started setting a bootpack just ahead of us. When we summited, we realized the other skier was the gentleman on the left here:

View attachment 63904

If you can't tell because of the hat, that's mohawked pro legend Glen Plake. We sat with him for an hour up top while the corn softened up, and we must have said the right things, because he invited us to head down with him:

View attachment 63905

Skied the east face and then Morrison Col, which has some amazing views:

View attachment 63906


Glen was great, telling stories, pointing out other great lines we could hit and suggesting we meet up again in May for some south Sierra trips. Uh, yes please.
This is so awesome, what an amazing encounter. Hanging out with Donnie Pelletier was pretty great, but this is WAY better.

Wrapped up our season with closing day at Sunday River yesterday, logged about 50 days on the season in total. We're ready to move on to golf season.
 

FlexFlexerson

Member
SoSH Member
Headed out with a buddy on Friday to tour out of Convict Lake near Mammoth. We switched objectives at the last minute and headed up the east side of Mount Morrison, which is a great peak with a ton of interesting options on the way down.

As we're climbing, another skier came up from our right and started setting a bootpack just ahead of us. When we summited, we realized the other skier was the gentleman on the left here:

View attachment 63904

If you can't tell because of the hat, that's mohawked pro legend Glen Plake. We sat with him for an hour up top while the corn softened up, and we must have said the right things, because he invited us to head down with him:

View attachment 63905

Skied the east face and then Morrison Col, which has some amazing views:

View attachment 63906


Glen was great, telling stories, pointing out other great lines we could hit and suggesting we meet up again in May for some south Sierra trips. Uh, yes please.
Incredible story, incredible lines
 

GoJeff!

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May 30, 2007
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Los Angeles
The Sierras got snow again, so we went powder hunting on Bloody Couloir. Up route is on the left, down is on the right.

64509

Getting to the peak takes a LONG time right now. There is so much snow that the road to the access road was impassible. Some years you can drive the first 4+ miles up the road. Not this year--we skinned and bootpacked seven miles.

Topping out:

64510


Looking down the gut

64511

Snow in the couloir was windboard and really tricky to ski. It turned to corn further down and was very nice, but the first third was about as tiring as skiing can be. I did about fifty jump turns in a row.

Hoping to get as much time up there as I can in the next month.
 

uncannymanny

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Jan 12, 2007
9,209
Out at Bachelor for maybe some of the last fresh snow of the season, day 30 even. Sounds a lot like your day @GoJeff!. A mess up top and corn below. Glad I brought the crud busters out.

I’m taking a 2-day park course this weekend. Always a wise thing to start doing at 45, but I just love (moderate) jumping.
 

Zososoxfan

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Jul 30, 2009
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Apologies for the drive-by post, but does anyone have any hotel recommendations for Santiago, Chile for 1 night en route to the mountains? Looking for specific hotels, or more likely just the better areas of the City that are centrally located. TIA!
 

Hildy

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Jul 15, 2005
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Frog Hall
The laziest way to ski Mt Wash is now available—Auto Rd. to snow fields…
Mr. Hildy and elder Hildy kid went up today. Absolute bluebird day…
65474
 
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Zososoxfan

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Jul 30, 2009
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The laziest way to ski Mt Wash is now available—Auto Rd. to snow fields…
Mr. Hildy and elder Hildy kid went up today. Absolute bluebird day…
View attachment 65474
Gorgeous pic, thanks for sharing!

Although I was a big skier during my adolesence in suburban Boston, I never got into it enough to get into mountaineering. Now that I'm starting to dip my toes into that world of adventure, I know I eventually need to make a pilgrimage to Tuckermans!
 

GoJeff!

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May 30, 2007
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Los Angeles
Month 9 of the season and still going strong in the Sierras. Had my biggest day of the year despite the mountain closing at 1:30. I guess that's a function of no kids and no lift lines. I'm really beat today.

66819

Had a hiking trip next weekend that we just switched over to a ski touring trip because of all the snow.
 

bigq

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Jul 15, 2005
11,666
I love that this thread is getting bumped in July and not from the southern hemisphere.

@GoJeff! I hope you get some turns in on the 4th. It’s just a few short months until next season kicks off.
 

uncannymanny

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Jan 12, 2007
9,209
I haven’t been out since May but trying to get to Timberline in the next week. I’ve never summer skied!
 

Zososoxfan

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Jul 30, 2009
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I'm starting to think about my Chile trip in mid-late August more and more, and I'm considering getting my own beacon to bring. I'm not going into the back or even side/slack country much if at all here in the States, but down there it's less controlled and my guides last year and this year both indicated it would be required. Last year I just used the beacon my guide provided me, but I'm considering buying my own so I can get a small profile quality beacon to start building my backcountry kit. Do y'all have any recommendations? TIA!
 

Zososoxfan

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Jul 30, 2009
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I missed this a couple of years back, but ski mountaineering to be an olympic sport!

Ski mountaineering will feature for the first time in the Winter Olympics in 2026, in Italy’s Milan and Cortina D’Ampezzo, following unanimous approval by the International Olympic Committee yesterday.

The sport, which combines ascents and descents of mountain trails on or while carrying skis, will have five events at the Olympics, according to Olympics.com.

The events will be sprints, individuals, and one mixed-gender relay and will feature 48 athletes (24 women and 24 men).

The IOC cited the sport’s popularity in hosts Italy and its rapid expansion in the United States and Canada.

The inclusion of ski mountaineering brings the number of winter sports to eight.
https://snowbrains.com/ski-mountaineering-debut-2026-winter-olympics/

That sounds awesome!
 

FlexFlexerson

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SoSH Member
This is a late update, but I skied St Mary's Glacier on July 3rd. It was a gorgeous day, and for anyone who's been it's short hike so it doesn't take too much time. No great photos of the skiing - the coverage was the best I've seen in, like, decades but the sun cups ensured no one on the snow was going to win any style contests - but nice to be on the snow in July.

View: https://www.instagram.com/p/CuQOtMBsUAk/?igshid=MzRlODBiNWFlZA==


(I hiked with my wife and kiddo and my parents - my dad was my ski companion - so snow photos start after the first photo on my insta post)
 

GoJeff!

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May 30, 2007
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Los Angeles
This is a late update, but I skied St Mary's Glacier on July 3rd. It was a gorgeous day, and for anyone who's been it's short hike so it doesn't take too much time. No great photos of the skiing - the coverage was the best I've seen in, like, decades but the sun cups ensured no one on the snow was going to win any style contests - but nice to be on the snow in July.

View: https://www.instagram.com/p/CuQOtMBsUAk/?igshid=MzRlODBiNWFlZA==


(I hiked with my wife and kiddo and my parents - my dad was my ski companion - so snow photos start after the first photo on my insta post)
Nice! Glad you got out there
 

uncannymanny

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Jan 12, 2007
9,209
I'm starting to think about my Chile trip in mid-late August more and more, and I'm considering getting my own beacon to bring. I'm not going into the back or even side/slack country much if at all here in the States, but down there it's less controlled and my guides last year and this year both indicated it would be required. Last year I just used the beacon my guide provided me, but I'm considering buying my own so I can get a small profile quality beacon to start building my backcountry kit. Do y'all have any recommendations? TIA!
From what I hear the BCAs have the fastest processor and if you’re racing against the clock, it matters.
 

GoJeff!

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May 30, 2007
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From what I hear the BCAs have the fastest processor and if you’re racing against the clock, it matters.
That is not the right thing to consider.

The number one issue is ease of use/ability to correctly use the beacon. All modern three antenna beacons are good enough, the biggest difference is how they display information and how they switch between modes. You want one that guides you in a search in a way that makes sense to you, whether that be voice commands, arrows, or other combinations. You also want a model where it makes sense how to switch between modes, because you absolutely cannot stay in send when you need to switch to search.

@Zososoxfan Here are the things to think about:

What are others in your group using? If your guides had a particular beacon they had you use, I would strongly consider the same model (or a similar model from the same company). You will be familiar with it, and they will be familiar with it. The second part is really important, since if you freeze up in a crisis they will be able to switch it off. People panic in an avalanche, and guides are unbelievably good at this stuff, so you do not want to screw them up.

Does it fit on your body? Some beacons feel lousy against the body, and people instead put them in a pocket. Don't do this. Avalanches are violent and can rip that beacon out of your pants very quickly. There are some pants with reinforced pockets for beacons, but I'd be really wary of using them. The beacon should be on the lowest layer of clothing, under all other layers.

Keep it simple. Some beacons have features to mark spots for multiple burials. You are not good enough to use this feature--it is for guides who are amazing at this. At best it is another way for you to screw up. Get the regular model.

Don't go bleeding edge. Last year, a few people in my group showed up with new designs, stuff like a flip phone instead of a knob to switch from send to search. These models generally were generally harder to use and had more problems. I'd stick to tried and true designs.

I like the BCA tracker 3 and the Mammut Barryvox, but others are good as well.
 
Last edited:

Zososoxfan

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Jul 30, 2009
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That is not the right thing to consider.

The number one issue is ease of use/ability to correctly use the beacon. All modern three antenna beacons are good enough, the biggest difference is how they display information and how they switch between modes. You want one that guides you in a search in a way that makes sense to you, whether that be voice commands, arrows, or other combinations. You also want a model where it makes sense how to switch between modes, because you absolutely cannot stay in send when you need to switch to search.

@Zososoxfan Here are the things to think about:

What are others in your group using? If your guides had a particular beacon they had you use, I would strongly consider the same model (or a similar model from the same company). You will be familiar with it, and they will be familiar with it. The second part is really important, since if you freeze up in a crisis they will be able to switch it off. People panic in an avalanche, and guides are unbelievably good at this stuff, so you do not want to screw them up.

Does it fit on your body? Some beacons feel lousy against the body, and people instead put them in a pocket. Don't do this. Avalanches are violent and can rip that beacon out of your pants very quickly. There are some pants with reinforced pockets for beacons, but I'd be really wary of using them. The beacon should be on the lowest layer of clothing, under all other layers.

Keep it simple. Some beacons have features to mark spots for multiple burials. You are not good enough to use this feature--it is for guides who are amazing at this. At best it is another way for you to screw up. Get the regular model.

Don't go bleeding edge. Last year, a few people in my group showed up with new designs, stuff like a flip phone instead of a knob to switch from send to search. These models generally were generally harder to use and had more problems. I'd stick to tried and true designs.

I like the BCA tracker 3 and the Mammut Barryvox, but others are good as well.
Thanks, I'll check if our guides have the gear in which case I'll use theirs. Portillo got 20 inches earlier this week, game on!
 

Zososoxfan

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Fantastic. When do you head down?
Flight leaves Thursday 8/17. Gonna spend Friday night in Santiago, then drive up to Portillo on Saturday. Plan to ski at Portillo Sunday, Tuesday, and possibly Wednesday, with a heli day on Monday leaving from the resort (conditions permitting)! That'll be my first heli day if it comes to pass. Then on Wednesday evening we're driving to Jahuel to stay at the hot spring hotel, and we'll do 2 days of cat-skiing (also a first!) on Thursday and Friday. A couple of my buddies are going to stay the second weekend and head down to Valle Nevado but I'm the only one with kiddos and I didn't wanna get greedy. I'm lucky enough that Mrs. Zoso agrees at all! But the hope is that once the kiddos are a bit older that we can all go down together. My life goal is stay down in South America for the month of July so the kiddos get to ski a ton, learn the language, and learn about the culture!
 

graffam198

dog lover
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Dec 10, 2007
1,890
Reno, NV
That is not the right thing to consider.

The number one issue is ease of use/ability to correctly use the beacon. All modern three antenna beacons are good enough, the biggest difference is how they display information and how they switch between modes. You want one that guides you in a search in a way that makes sense to you, whether that be voice commands, arrows, or other combinations. You also want a model where it makes sense how to switch between modes, because you absolutely cannot stay in send when you need to switch to search.

@Zososoxfan Here are the things to think about:

What are others in your group using? If your guides had a particular beacon they had you use, I would strongly consider the same model (or a similar model from the same company). You will be familiar with it, and they will be familiar with it. The second part is really important, since if you freeze up in a crisis they will be able to switch it off. People panic in an avalanche, and guides are unbelievably good at this stuff, so you do not want to screw them up.

Does it fit on your body? Some beacons feel lousy against the body, and people instead put them in a pocket. Don't do this. Avalanches are violent and can rip that beacon out of your pants very quickly. There are some pants with reinforced pockets for beacons, but I'd be really wary of using them. The beacon should be on the lowest layer of clothing, under all other layers.

Keep it simple. Some beacons have features to mark spots for multiple burials. You are not good enough to use this feature--it is for guides who are amazing at this. At best it is another way for you to screw up. Get the regular model.

Don't go bleeding edge. Last year, a few people in my group showed up with new designs, stuff like a flip phone instead of a knob to switch from send to search. These models generally were generally harder to use and had more problems. I'd stick to tried and true designs.

I like the BCA tracker 3 and the Mammut Barryvox, but others are good as well.
This is excellent. And for @Zososoxfan the only thing I would add is that PRACTICE MATTERS. If you don't know how to use your beacon, you are better off without one. Practice, Practice, Practice. Especially with your gloves ON.

Time matters. But you know what? Haste makes waste. It is better to take a few extra seconds to make sure you have done your assessment and prep right the first time. What does that mean? Buddy in a slide. OK, we have to find him. But first let's assess. Is it safe to enter the zone? Do we know where they were when they went under? Do we see any clues on the surface? Did EVERYONE switch their beacons to search and not send? All of these little scenarios can be practiced at home, off the snow, and should be run through every season. Finding a buried beacon is HARD. Really hard. Focus on the small things first.

I have the Ortovox 3, which I really like, but, like @GoJeff! Says, it is very very simple to use. I have the chest harness. I spend a lot of time practicing getting under my layers, getting beacon out, switching to search with my gloves on.

We do a beacon check every tour. No matter what the objective is. 40m is not very far. And that's line of sight. So easy to bunk your signal with some trees or a slope. Also, put your phone in Airplane mode! That can hinder the beacon.

I personally don't care for BCA. The reason? They don't offer service checks. I send mine in every 2 years for bench testing. My partner has a BAC and they won't do a manufacturers test once they leave the shop. He likes it, easy to use, but does complain that if there is an issue, it's a guess as to what it is and the only recourse is getting a new one (if the warranty is still good!). Just my 2 cents.

And honestly, the above applies to all your gear. You know what a pain in the ass it is to put a shovel together or get your probe out efficiently? That stuff takes practice. And if your guides are the ones that get rolled, well, you have to be prepared to be in charge. Hell, even stripping skins in a windy environment, or getting used to daggering in your skis to get in and out. All really important skills that I think we, as alpinists, sometimes forget to work on. Plus, it's kind of fun to dink around w/that stuff and get good at it.

Jealous and wish it was me heading out there! Going to be an awesome trip.
 

FlexFlexerson

Member
SoSH Member
On the gear and backcountry tips, I'm sure this is preaching to the choir, but I can't recommend enough taking a level 1 avalanche safety course for anyone with deeper interest in backcountry skiing. I got my certification years ago now, but I learned so much that's gone into my decision making and got a huge leg up in understanding and using avalanche gear. Obviously too late for an August ski trip, but food for thought for the future.
 

GoJeff!

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May 30, 2007
2,088
Los Angeles
A avy course is a must, but all kinds of professional training really help if you plan to go out there on your own.

Last week I hired a guide to go over snow and rock anchors with me. Over the course of the day, we also practiced stuff like crampon use, ice axe, and self arrest.

I use an ice axe and crampons all the time, but he was able to show me lots of little tips to improve my technique. Being forced to slide headfirst and self arrest is totally different from mostly knowing how to do it.

You can always use a lesson, and there are lots of dangers beyond just avalanches.
 

Zososoxfan

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Jul 30, 2009
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South of North
Even though I'm no backcountry guy yet, I love this kinda chat! I'm planning to go with the fam to Copper next April and I saw that they have uphill/backcountry lessons, so I'm thinking about taking one. I was really getting excited to check out Bluebird soon but I found out recently they're closing this summer. I hope someone else picks up the concept.
 

GoJeff!

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May 30, 2007
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Los Angeles
Mammoth just announced an Aug 6 closing date.

Was hoping they'd make labor day, but snow melts damn fast in July. Probably will do one more trip up there with the kids.
 

uncannymanny

Member
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Jan 12, 2007
9,209
That is not the right thing to consider.

The number one issue is ease of use/ability to correctly use the beacon. All modern three antenna beacons are good enough, the biggest difference is how they display information and how they switch between modes. You want one that guides you in a search in a way that makes sense to you, whether that be voice commands, arrows, or other combinations. You also want a model where it makes sense how to switch between modes, because you absolutely cannot stay in send when you need to switch to search.

@Zososoxfan Here are the things to think about:

What are others in your group using? If your guides had a particular beacon they had you use, I would strongly consider the same model (or a similar model from the same company). You will be familiar with it, and they will be familiar with it. The second part is really important, since if you freeze up in a crisis they will be able to switch it off. People panic in an avalanche, and guides are unbelievably good at this stuff, so you do not want to screw them up.

Does it fit on your body? Some beacons feel lousy against the body, and people instead put them in a pocket. Don't do this. Avalanches are violent and can rip that beacon out of your pants very quickly. There are some pants with reinforced pockets for beacons, but I'd be really wary of using them. The beacon should be on the lowest layer of clothing, under all other layers.

Keep it simple. Some beacons have features to mark spots for multiple burials. You are not good enough to use this feature--it is for guides who are amazing at this. At best it is another way for you to screw up. Get the regular model.

Don't go bleeding edge. Last year, a few people in my group showed up with new designs, stuff like a flip phone instead of a knob to switch from send to search. These models generally were generally harder to use and had more problems. I'd stick to tried and true designs.

I like the BCA tracker 3 and the Mammut Barryvox, but others are good as well.
Yeah it’s true. No one needs my help. I’ll leave the thread to y’all. I guess I just miss skiing.
 

Zososoxfan

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Jul 30, 2009
9,375
South of North
With only 1.5 weeks until my Chile trip, we've had to reconfigure things a bit due to the warm and dry weather. While Portillo still looks OK with coverage, Ski Arpa (catskiing ops) needs about 2 feet of snow until they can open up. And while the area is expecting about a foot of snow in the next 48 hours, that won't be enough. So we're likely going to head down to Valle Nevado for 2 days there, with possibly 1 as a heli day. While I'm really bummed about Arpa, getting to see Portillo and VN in the same trip is still really effing cool.

My question for this group is whether anyone's skiied or ridden with a GoPro 11 Black on a helmet mount. I'm in the market for a new camera, as my Hero Session 5 is quite old and buggy. I really dislike GoPro's customer service, but they do make good cameras. The latest releases are the 11 Black and the Mini. The 11 Black has some nice features but right now it's the same price as well. My only real concern with it is whether it's too bulky to wear as a helmet cam. Chest mounts don't work for riders and I'm not good enough to trust myself with a hand grip mount for challenging terrain. Can anyone advise?
 

Bowhemian

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Nov 10, 2015
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Bow, NH
Can anyone recommend a decent and somewhat inexpensive ski jacket? I need something other than my snowmobile jacket, it is too big and bulky (but quite warm).
I don't ski in extreme cold typically. I like to go hard and fast, so I tend to sweat if overdressed. So I need something lighter, possibly something with a removable lining.
 

Zososoxfan

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Jul 30, 2009
9,375
South of North
Can anyone recommend a decent and somewhat inexpensive ski jacket? I need something other than my snowmobile jacket, it is too big and bulky (but quite warm).
I don't ski in extreme cold typically. I like to go hard and fast, so I tend to sweat if overdressed. So I need something lighter, possibly something with a removable lining.
Early season sales are starting in the next few weeks, so your timing isn't bad! I switched to a 3L shell recently and like it a lot. It's made by L1 and the model is the Theorem. My only gripes about the jacket are that the chest pockets can't fit my iPhone 14 Pro Max (it is a giant phone TBF) and while it has vents, it doesn't have any mesh lining. Some days I'll just ride with a base layer underneath, but I like having a midlayer for variable weather most of the time. I have a variety of those midlayers, ranging from light technical sweatshirts, a full zip fleece (what I use most), or a heavy Spyder multifabric for real cold (10 degrees or colder).
 

fairlee76

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Oct 9, 2005
3,661
jp
Can anyone recommend a decent and somewhat inexpensive ski jacket? I need something other than my snowmobile jacket, it is too big and bulky (but quite warm).
I don't ski in extreme cold typically. I like to go hard and fast, so I tend to sweat if overdressed. So I need something lighter, possibly something with a removable lining.
Not sure if you're up for a shell-only option, but I bought this one last season and love it: https://www.patagonia.com/product/mens-powder-town-ski-snowboard-jacket/31625.html?dwvar_31625_color=BLK&cgid=jackets. Comes in a 3L option as well but the price jumps a fair amount.

Great venting options, windproof and waterproof, all the pocket options, etc. I did upgrade from a 15 year-old shell so that might be part of my "love it" review. Anything was going to be a big upgrade over what I was wearing.
 

Preacher

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Jun 9, 2006
6,654
Pyeongtaek, South Korea
Can anyone recommend a decent and somewhat inexpensive ski jacket? I need something other than my snowmobile jacket, it is too big and bulky (but quite warm).
I don't ski in extreme cold typically. I like to go hard and fast, so I tend to sweat if overdressed. So I need something lighter, possibly something with a removable lining.
I just wear a north face rain jacket, which is just a gortex shell and vary what a wear underneath. I really like the options to switch up the under layers.
 

graffam198

dog lover
SoSH Member
Dec 10, 2007
1,890
Reno, NV
Can anyone recommend a decent and somewhat inexpensive ski jacket? I need something other than my snowmobile jacket, it is too big and bulky (but quite warm).
I don't ski in extreme cold typically. I like to go hard and fast, so I tend to sweat if overdressed. So I need something lighter, possibly something with a removable lining.
I suffer from the same affliction as you. Always hot. Last winter I skied primarily in a Patagonia Nano Puff with just a t-shirt underneath it for the majority of my resort days. 229 bucks seems pretty fair. The other option is the Ferrosi from Outdoor Research at 129. I used that for all my back country days...

I mean, if you are avoiding cold, I'm assuming you are avoiding days w/heavy precip as well. If that's not the case, then forget the above. But anything that is Gore Tex is basically wearing a trash bag. Sure, they claim breathability but I do nothing but sweat in them. Same with anything H2No or "waterproof". You probably want a softshell which seems harder and harder to find these days.
 

Zososoxfan

Member
SoSH Member
Jul 30, 2009
9,375
South of North
Gee, ya think it was a slow start to the season? It's been crickets in here since December! I had 2 trips planned for the season, but I just cancelled the family trip to Copper Mountain in Colorado because Mrs. Zoso booked a girls trip that weekend. So for now, the only thing I have on the books is a trip to Steamboat next month for Winter Wondergrass. Since we cancelled Copper and we're looking to save some money, I'm also considering a family trip to one of the hills in North Carolina/West Virginia. I've heard good things about Snowshoe, WV, and Sugar and Beech in NC. One issue I need to figure out is if anyone offers lessons (even if private) for my 3 year old. My 5 year old should do really well on these less intimidating slopes. We'd be going in March, so I know conditions will be a toss up. We're coming from Tampa so we still need to figure out whether to drive or fly. Flying would take away some of the economic incentive, but even NC is about 12 hours, so Snowshoe would be ~17 from what I understand.

How's everyone else's season going? Any trips coming up?
 

Zososoxfan

Member
SoSH Member
Jul 30, 2009
9,375
South of North
I'm starting a business in the snowsports space (will provide details soon!), and I'm looking at potential advertising avenues. What websites/social media/podcasts/shops/etc. do you guys follow about skiing? My list is below, TIA!!

Websites
Powderhounds
Z Snow Rankings
Angry Snowboarder
Snowboard Profiles
Snowbrains
The Good Ride

Podcasts
Snowbrains
Storm Skiing

Shops
The Ski Monster Shop (Boston)
Peter Glenn (Chain store throughout Florida)

Social Media
Unofficial Networks
SKI Magazine
Lift Blog
 

FlexFlexerson

Member
SoSH Member
Definitely a slow start to the season, but glad folks are getting out there. Envious of your planned trip to winterwondergrass @Zososoxfan, I've never been but it always looks like a blast. And the boat has been getting relatively good snow this season too.

@uncannymanny - what are some of those areas you skied? Looks like a good spread.

I've been out a decent amount but it's been mostly going out for an hour or two and ripping groomers and/or doing some in-bounds uphill skinning. That said, over mlk weekend Colorado got walloped with a big winter storm. I stayed away over the holiday weekend which was a mess on the roads and slopes, but went out midweek for a follow up storm and had am absolutely beautiful power day at an almost deserted Arapahoe Basin. The storm from the weekend got a bunch of terrain open for those guys and a good base and then the storm I was there for delivered a foot + of pow which skied like a dream. Can't remember the last time I truly skied bell to bell but the conditions just did not deteriorate all day. One area would get skied up a bit and then they'd drop rope somewhere else. All. Day. One of the best ski days I've had in years. Funny how you can get those even in these leaner years. I'm still kinda living off the high of that day.

I mostly skied solo that day so no great photos, but the other big ski event of the season for me has been getting my 2 year old kiddo on skis a few times. Here's one of his latest ski adventures (the grandparents driveway make a good learning hill it turns out):
View: https://www.instagram.com/p/C14k1har8Qs