Somewhere, Brian Cashman is Furiously Kicking His Own Ass: Whitlock Edition

Sprowl

mikey lowell of the sandbox
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Jun 27, 2006
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I am copying this post over from the general thread because it shows Whitlock developing new pitches to amplify his already excellent sinker-changeup combination:
And soon it will be gyroball time:
https://www.bostonglobe.com/2024/03/30/sports/red-sox-garrett-whitlock/
As an aside, based on the comments so far from Bellow and Whitlock, it seems that Bailey is making some kind of connection.
From the linked Glob article:
Now, 17 years later, the Red Sox may actually have a pitcher who throws a gyroball.
After working on it during spring training, Garrett Whitlock will use a new pitch against the Seattle Mariners when he makes his first start of the season on Sunday.
“What’s it called? You’ll have to ask Bailey,” Whitlock said, directing a curious reporter to pitching coach Andrew Bailey.
Bailey referred to the pitch as a gyro slider or a bullet slider. It’s a slider thrown with a downward break.
Back in the old PitchFX days, I used to call the bullet slider a Brad Lidge slider, after the reliever who put it to most effective use. Its spin axis is the same as the ball's trajectory, meaning that the spin does not cause any deviation from the initial trajectory. If the batter knows that it is coming, it can be an old-fashioned hanging slider, but if the batter sees the dot, diagnoses a breaking pitch, and expects it to behave like a sweeper, he will extend the barrel too far and stands a good chance of breaking his bat.
 
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Niastri

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SoSH Member
I am copying this post over from the general thread because it shows Whitlock developing new pitches to amplify his already excellent sinker-changeup combination:

From the linked Glob article:


Back in the old PitchFX days, I used to call the bullet slider a Brad Lidge slider, after the reliever who put it to most effective use. Its spin axis is the same as the ball's trajectory, meaning that the spin does not cause any deviation from the initial trajectory. If the batter knows that it is coming, it can be an old-fashioned hanging slider, but if the batter sees the dot, diagnoses a breaking pitch, and expects it to behave like a sweeper, he will extend the barrel too far and stands a good chance of breaking his bat.
If I understand correctly, it's a straight pitch, but because of the spin, most batters are going to confuse it with a sweeper? So the hitter winds up getting the handle instead of the sweet spot of the bat?

What is it's relative velocity?

EDIT: Found this video. I have no idea what this guys reputation is, if he had one at all.

View: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Kwfwvi5qBks
 

absintheofmalaise

too many flowers
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Mar 16, 2005
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If I understand correctly, it's a straight pitch, but because of the spin, most batters are going to confuse it with a sweeper? So the hitter winds up getting the handle instead of the sweet spot of the bat?

What is it's relative velocity?

EDIT: Found this video. I have no idea what this guys reputation is, if he had one at all.

View: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Kwfwvi5qBks
From what I remember the spin that the batter sees fools him into thinking that the pitch will break and it doesn't the way he expects it to.
An article with videos from Alan Nathan on his Physics of Baseball site.
Here's an article from The Hardball Times in 2017 on the pitch.
 

E5 Yaz

polka king
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Apr 25, 2002
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Another really solid start on April 11. A couple of long at-bats, particularly Rutschman's 11-pitch flyout to end the fifth, likely kept him from going another inning

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