#DFG: Canceling the Noise

Is there any level of suspension that you would advise Tom to accept?


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m0ckduck

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The thought of cherrypicked summary data being released terrifies me - only way I see it being released is if it has been manipulated to support the NFL/media circus.
Everyone's picked sides already. Anti-Pats partisans will lap it up, but they're not coming back to the fold anyway. I'm pretty sure self-respecting journalists have already been led too far down the garden path of NFL propaganda to take any kind of partial release of information seriously. Even people who think Brady 'probably did something' know that the league can't be trusted after the sham Wells Report and arbitration process.
 

Hoya81

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https://sports.yahoo.com/news/1-year-after-deflate-gate-ballooned--science-shows-shame-of-it-all-073316233.html

Wetzel detailing the rejection of Exponent's analysis in the WR:

As time has allowed more serious analysis to come in, the results have been an overwhelming destruction of the conclusions of Wells, Exponent and the consulting work of Princeton professor Daniel Marlow.

It's been from all directions: the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (multiple studies), Carnegie Mellon University, the University of Chicago, Boston College, the University of Nebraska, the University of Illinois, the University of New Hampshire, Bowdoin College, Rockefeller University, where a Noble Prize winner couldn't have lampooned it more viciously, and so on and so on.
 

dcmissle

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So basically if the Pats beat Denver the league will try to distract the Pats (again) leading up to the Super Bowl.

If Denver wins my guess is the league releases the results in the week leading up to the draft to "prove" they were right to take the first round pick
1. Based on last year and everything else we know about this team, what is the reason to believe the Pats' performance would suffer?

2. Florio is showing his fangs in that little drive-by post. League will not get benefit of doubt. As noted above, opinions are fixed, and if anything weight of commentary is trending Pats.

3. If the Pats are not in the SB, they would be absolutely nuts to float anything. It is the 50th; they would be pissing on their own landmark event. And it would be unfair to Broncos and whoever comes out of NFC to float this.

4. If anything, you might see a leak around the time of oral arguments in the Second Circuit. That would be stupid too. Judges would well know, if they saw it, that this is cherry picked data not subject to the adversarial process and not fair game for the appeal.

5. League needs to be careful with this generally. If it pisses off the wrong person, it could be met with a subpoena from Congress seeking all of the underlying data, well beyond what has been scrubbed for public consumption.
 

JimBoSox9

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1. Based on last year and everything else we know about this team, what is the reason to believe the Pats' performance would suffer?
Little men will still continue to try little things, even when they know in the back of their little minds that they achieve little results. It gives them their sad purpose in life.
 

BaseballJones

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I really do wonder what goes through Goodell's head and in the minds of the other owners at this point. I mean, it's abundantly clear that at least in the case of Deflategate, NOTHING happened. That the balls deflated normally. And when tests have been run this year confirming that, while I know the NFL will never publish anything that makes them look bad, they have to KNOW that nature just did what nature does.

So here they are, pursuing a case against a player they know did nothing wrong. A star player that is completely innocent, at least of these specific charges. They have levied a penalty against a team for a "crime" they didn't commit.

How do they justify this in their own minds? Do they really STILL believe that the Patriots cheated here? In spite of basically no evidence that they did, and overwhelming evidence that they didn't? If so, how, really, do they arrive at that conclusion?

And if they don't still believe it, what is the justification for the penalty at this point? Are they really ok penalizing the Patriots, and pursing penalties against Tom Brady, for a crime that they believe did not actually happen? Do they care about setting a horrible precedent at all? Are they not worried that somehow the league could do something similar to them in the future? Or is it truly a league-wide anti-Patriots effort to bring down the most successful franchise in the NFL?

What are these other owners and the commissioner thinking at this point?
 

Ed Hillel

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Goodell: "We measured footballs in many locations* and in none of those circumstances did the footballs lose as much pressure as the Patriots' last January."

ESPN: "lolomg Cheatriots!!!"

Something like that.


*Miami, San Diego, Indianapolis, unseasonably warm day in Denver, etc.
 

Red(s)HawksFan

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What are these other owners and the commissioner thinking at this point?
It's cute that you believe they'll "learn" that they were dead wrong. It's cute that you believe any of them will "learn" anything.

They'll massage whatever data they have to make themselves look the least wrong as possible. Of that we should have no doubt. Whether they also massage the data in order to further hammer the Patriots as "criminals" in this matter is the only thing up in the air. To me, doing so is only going to invite further criticism and analysis of their findings than otherwise might happen.
 

Bleedred

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I really do wonder what goes through Goodell's head and in the minds of the other owners at this point. I mean, it's abundantly clear that at least in the case of Deflategate, NOTHING happened. That the balls deflated normally. And when tests have been run this year confirming that, while I know the NFL will never publish anything that makes them look bad, they have to KNOW that nature just did what nature does.

So here they are, pursuing a case against a player they know did nothing wrong. A star player that is completely innocent, at least of these specific charges. They have levied a penalty against a team for a "crime" they didn't commit.

How do they justify this in their own minds? Do they really STILL believe that the Patriots cheated here? In spite of basically no evidence that they did, and overwhelming evidence that they didn't? If so, how, really, do they arrive at that conclusion?

And if they don't still believe it, what is the justification for the penalty at this point? Are they really ok penalizing the Patriots, and pursing penalties against Tom Brady, for a crime that they believe did not actually happen? Do they care about setting a horrible precedent at all? Are they not worried that somehow the league could do something similar to them in the future? Or is it truly a league-wide anti-Patriots effort to bring down the most successful franchise in the NFL?

What are these other owners and the commissioner thinking at this point?
The case is over with respect to the team penalty...they just don't care and none of the other owners (perhaps with limited exceptions) are clear thinking enough to realize the implication that you mention. And because the legal case against Brady no longer has anything to do with whether or not footballs were intentionally deflated, but rather everything to do with the commissioner's power to punish without interference, they will continue to fight that case until the ends of the earth. It's a sickening reality
 

Valek123

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The other owners are thinking the Pats have been too successful for too long, and the commissioner is a moron. Don't mistake that the other owners are loving any competitive advantage over the pats with any thoughts of precedent - when the line shifts to go after another team those same owners hell bent on seeing the Pats run over will flip-flop. The justification on the NFL's end are the texts and the bathroom stop, good bad or indifferent they will die on that hill. It's the only thing they could pin this to once all other science blew up as high school science classes clearly have more knowledge than anyone working under this commissioner. There will be no change, it truly is what it is. Here's hoping the picks we lose the next two seasons are the last picks in every round.
 

BlackJack

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I really do wonder what goes through Goodell's head and in the minds of the other owners at this point. I mean, it's abundantly clear that at least in the case of Deflategate, NOTHING happened. That the balls deflated normally. And when tests have been run this year confirming that, while I know the NFL will never publish anything that makes them look bad, they have to KNOW that nature just did what nature does.
I think you're making a big assumption here. It is entirely plausible that Goodell and company still believe that the Brady cheated. People reject scientific evidence all the time when it contradicts what they want to believe.
 

PayrodsFirstClutchHit

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The other owners are thinking the Pats have been too successful for too long, and the commissioner is a moron. Don't mistake that the other owners are loving any competitive advantage over the pats with any thoughts of precedent - when the line shifts to go after another team those same owners hell bent on seeing the Pats run over will flip-flop. The justification on the NFL's end are the texts and the bathroom stop, good bad or indifferent they will die on that hill. It's the only thing they could pin this to once all other science blew up as high school science classes clearly have more knowledge than anyone working under this commissioner. There will be no change, it truly is what it is. Here's hoping the picks we lose the next two seasons are the last picks in every round.
You are forgetting the other key piece of evidence. Brady destroyed his phone before the real evidence could be found. That is clear proof of intent to hide his scheme.
 

CoffeeNerdness

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I really do wonder what goes through Goodell's head and in the minds of the other owners at this point. I mean, it's abundantly clear that at least in the case of Deflategate, NOTHING happened. That the balls deflated normally. And when tests have been run this year confirming that, while I know the NFL will never publish anything that makes them look bad, they have to KNOW that nature just did what nature does.

So here they are, pursuing a case against a player they know did nothing wrong. A star player that is completely innocent, at least of these specific charges. They have levied a penalty against a team for a "crime" they didn't commit.

How do they justify this in their own minds? Do they really STILL believe that the Patriots cheated here? In spite of basically no evidence that they did, and overwhelming evidence that they didn't? If so, how, really, do they arrive at that conclusion?

And if they don't still believe it, what is the justification for the penalty at this point? Are they really ok penalizing the Patriots, and pursing penalties against Tom Brady, for a crime that they believe did not actually happen? Do they care about setting a horrible precedent at all? Are they not worried that somehow the league could do something similar to them in the future? Or is it truly a league-wide anti-Patriots effort to bring down the most successful franchise in the NFL?

What are these other owners and the commissioner thinking at this point?
Making a Deflator
 

( . ) ( . ) and (_!_)

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I really do wonder what goes through Goodell's head and in the minds of the other owners at this point. I mean, it's abundantly clear that at least in the case of Deflategate, NOTHING happened. That the balls deflated normally. And when tests have been run this year confirming that, while I know the NFL will never publish anything that makes them look bad, they have to KNOW that nature just did what nature does.

So here they are, pursuing a case against a player they know did nothing wrong. A star player that is completely innocent, at least of these specific charges. They have levied a penalty against a team for a "crime" they didn't commit.

How do they justify this in their own minds? Do they really STILL believe that the Patriots cheated here? In spite of basically no evidence that they did, and overwhelming evidence that they didn't? If so, how, really, do they arrive at that conclusion?

And if they don't still believe it, what is the justification for the penalty at this point? Are they really ok penalizing the Patriots, and pursing penalties against Tom Brady, for a crime that they believe did not actually happen? Do they care about setting a horrible precedent at all? Are they not worried that somehow the league could do something similar to them in the future? Or is it truly a league-wide anti-Patriots effort to bring down the most successful franchise in the NFL?

What are these other owners and the commissioner thinking at this point?
You are making a big mistake in your thinking here. This may have started because the NFL thought that they could nail the Pats for cheating but it is no longer about that and has not been about ball PSI for quite some time.

Many many months ago this saga shifted and was no longer about the NFL vs. the Patriots and deflated balls but was about the NFL vs. the NFLPA. The impetus for how we got here is no longer relevant to the NFL, people have made up their minds, the NFL has largely won in the court of public opinion and everything about what happened to Tom Brady and the Patriots is just window dressing.

I don't know how to put it more plainly..... This is about the NFL Commissioner's power over the players. Nothing more and nothing less. The NFL office wants the ability to do whatever they think is in the best PR direction for the NFL regardless of what is written in the CBA. Winning the court case strengthens their ability to continue to do so.

None of what is at stake now for the NFL and NFLPA has anything to do with what did or did not happen at last year's AFC championship. The cheating allegations, the Wells report, the media tricks were all just a means to an end for the NFL office. The Pats and Brady are just collateral damage. The NFL and NFLPA were always going to end up here, Deflate-gate was just the convenient vehicle to get them here quickest.

So what are the league office and other owners thinking right now... They are thinking let's win in court so that we can continue to rule the players with an iron fist and piss on their little CBA so that our pockets get bigger and bigger.

Right or wrong, true or false, guilty or non guilty does not even enter into the equation.
 

crossdog

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Kraft should come out beating the drum for the data collected. If the data isn't released then how can the NFL justify the penalty?

What worries me is that Kraft is not pushing for the data release and possibly has the data already and it doesn't gel.
 

BaseballJones

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No I understand at this point the issue is the power struggle between the owners (NFL) and players. That's why the Brady case is still being pursued.

But I just wonder what the owners and Goodell are THINKING. Do they believe the Patriots cheated or not? If yes, WHY, in the face of overwhelming scientific evidence to the contrary? What makes them think this? Is it really the isolated, strange "deflator" text, a bathroom visit, and Brady "destroying" his cell phone? Even though science tells us that nothing besides the laws of physics happened to the footballs?

If they don't think the Patriots cheated, why doesn't that matter to them? The story a while back was that the owners see this as retribution for Spygate. So for the owners, are they ok with punishing a player and team simply out of vengeance for a past crime (never mind the fact that the Patriots were already docked $1 million and a first round pick for that)?

It just seems amazing to me that in light of what the scientific consensus is in this matter, that the owners wouldn't care at least a little that they are punishing a franchise severely for doing nothing wrong.

In other words, are there any owners out there that think, "Geez, are we really going to keep this penalty in place against the Patriots, when it's pretty clear they didn't do anything wrong here?"
 

Hoodie Sleeves

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But I just wonder what the owners and Goodell are THINKING. Do they believe the Patriots cheated or not? If yes, WHY, in the face of overwhelming scientific evidence to the contrary? What makes them think this? Is it really the isolated, strange "deflator" t
Yes, they probably still think the Patriots cheated.

The simple fact is that people don't generally work from evidence to conclusion - they generally start with a narrative and then interpret the data in the context of the narrative. It's very difficult for most people to acknowledge their biases and discard their narrative.

What you're seeing is the basis for conspiracy theorists, anti-vaxxers, and the vast majority of nonsense present in this world.

I think Terry Pratchett said it best:
The anthropologists got it wrong when they named our species Homo sapiens ('wise man'). In any case it's an arrogant and bigheaded thing to say, wisdom being one of our least evident features. In reality, we are Pan narrans, the storytelling chimpanzee.
 

kartvelo

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What worries me is that Kraft is not pushing for the data release and possibly has the data already and it doesn't gel.
The data does gel, because the laws of physics still exist.
The data can be made to look as though it doesn't gel, because duplicity and ignorance still exist.
 

snowmanny

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I don't think they would know hat to do with the data. Are they trying to confirm that changes in temperature changes air pressure? Only complete morons would feel the need to check for that. The only utility would be in showing that two sets of footballs that start at one temperature/pressure which are then put outside in a different temperature and are subject to routine game conditions may end up a different pressures depending on how they are handled/stored/prepped AND that there may be individual ball variability within each set.

Here's what I don't get...if it is important even a little bit for balls to be at 12.5 psi why don't they simply set the balls at 12.5 outside at game temperature instead of indoors at some other temperature? That seems like a pretty obvious fix to me. The only (ONLY) reason not to do that is that the psi is not important.
 

Hoya81

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Goodell: "We measured footballs in many locations* and in none of those circumstances did the footballs lose as much pressure as the Patriots' last January."

ESPN: "lolomg Cheatriots!!!"

Something like that.


*Miami, San Diego, Indianapolis, unseasonably warm day in Denver, etc.
I always thought the most overlooked aspect of DFG is that without the actual pregame PSI for each ball, all of the scientific analyses and debate is mostly useless. Aside from Walt Anderson's recollection (that Wells went at length to discount with regards to the gauges) there is no evidence that either team was using balls within the allowed PSI when the game started.
 
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CoffeeNerdness

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The Florio disclosure is neatly timed after odd leak that the MINN v. SEA game would have halftime PSI checks. Maybe now with irrefutable data that shows a significant PSI loss in cold weather they can clumsily try to dig themselves out of this pit of lies. Maybe, just maybe, they think, idiots that they may be, that they could leak this info exonerating the Pats and celebrate the NFL's finest franchise playing in another SuperBowl. They would get eyeballs on eyeballs on every NFL story or TV piece leading up to the big game. They would get the ultimate shitshow that they so desperately crave. All they have to do is eat another shit sandwich, and given their taste for shit sandwiches after you eat half a dozen what's one more. At this point DeflateGate fatigue has run this story into the ground. If they think they're going to get the clicks and eyeballs on a year old story, they're sorely mistaken, and they know this.

I take it back, they're goddamn geniuses.
 

Morgan's Magic Snowplow

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I honestly have no clue what the NFL could possibly stand to gain by releasing any of this data. Are they going to release doctored numbers that prove that the Ideal Gas Law doesn't exist? Goodell has already extracted his pound of flesh to appease his base among the other owners. They've already managed to tar the Cheatriots among the know-nothing mass public and, among those people with enough intelligence and awareness to realize that the whole thing was a sham, doctored numbers won't change minds. There is almost no upside and potentially some downside to a data release, doctored or not.
 

( . ) ( . ) and (_!_)

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The NFL has shown that they are going to lean on the Wells report no matter how flawed. If the data predictably proves that science does in fact exist then they will just go back to the Wells report which says that the balls were deflated by more then the ideal gas law would predict.

There conclusion will obviously be flawed and even the Wells report admits that the balls were deflated a minuscule amount below what would be expected from weather, but none of that will matter. ESPN, Peter King, the NFL Network, et all will have their talking point handed to them from the NFL alongside the data. The specifics and details won't matter, just the little blurb that the Pats balls exceeded what the Ideal Gas Law predicted will be mentioned.

We care about the details, the rest of the football world does not.
 

PayrodsFirstClutchHit

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The NFL has moved past the science when making their case. The focus of the NFL appeal hearing was "Brady destroyed his phone". The NFL has taken the position that we will never know the full truth because of that act. They point to the "Deflator" comments and other vague text messages as proof of a scheme.

There is no value add to the argument for the NFL to get back into the PSI/science debate. They can always hang their hat on the destruction of evidence argument and the text messages as enough proof to convince the masses that a cover-up of something bad occurred.
 

Morgan's Magic Snowplow

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Slightly off topic...The NFL just named political spinmeister supreme Joe Lockhart as new Executive Vice President for Communications. I think this exchange, from Triumph's classic visit to spin alley, pretty sums up the skill set he'll bring to Goodell's office.

TRIUMPH: (Talking to Joe Lockhart) You handled Clinton, so you're ready for anything, right?

LOCKHART: I think that's true -- I think that's true.

TRIUMPH: Joe Lockhart -- I mean if John Kerry, tonight in the debate, were to get oral sex behind the podium, you'd be the go-to guy -- to spin it.

LOCKHART: What do you mean by that? How do you define that?

TRIUMPH: Ahhhhaaa...those were the days!
 

twothousandone

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And if they don't still believe it, what is the justification for the penalty at this point? Are they really ok penalizing the Patriots, and pursing penalties against Tom Brady, for a crime that they believe did not actually happen? Do they care about setting a horrible precedent at all? Are they not worried that somehow the league could do something similar to them in the future?
I've never had a great grasp of the details, but some here have made a compelling argument that Bob Kraft should answer this exact question for his acquiescence when the league brought the hammer down on the Saints.
Kraft should come out beating the drum for the data collected. If the data isn't released then how can the NFL justify the penalty?
Kraft gave up the fight when he accepted the penalty. He knew, then, there was no going back. He wants to be inside the NFL club, not an outsider.
 

ifmanis5

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He can write all the apologies he wants but as we have seen in the past (cough Tomase cough) the damage has been done, minds have been changed and they aren't changing back. All the authors of this debacle, Mort, Kravitz, Roger, Kensil, Wells, Pash can suck it.
 

PedroKsBambino

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With the benefit of hindsight and a lot more info coming out--both science coming down at near-indisputable consistency that the reported levels do not prove or even strongly suggest tampering, plus that Exponent's report is worthless; and the NFL's own machinations being laid bare during the Berman hearings--I honestly don't believe any of the reporters or people involved who followed the thing with any level of detail feel differently than what Kravitz said here. Some (Shank, and certainly Goodell himself) probably aren't honest enough human beings to acknowledge they were wrong, so credit to Kravitz for eventually doing so, but the only credible conclusion here has been blisteringly obvious for many months and even the deniers have to face reality at some point.

Like others said---screw Kravitz, too, he took far too long to pay enough attention to know what was going on, and had an ego about things that his meager reasoning and reporting skills couldn't support. Those things don't change just because he acknowledged them eventually.
 

Kevin Youkulele

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Some (Shank, and certainly Goodell himself) probably aren't honest enough human beings to acknowledge they were wrong, so credit to Kravitz for eventually doing so, but the only credible conclusion here has been blisteringly obvious for many months and even the deniers have to face reality at some point.
This sentence is at war with itself. Which is it? Will the fundamentally dishonest never acknowledge their wrongfulness, or face reality?
 

PedroKsBambino

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This sentence is at war with itself. Which is it? Will the fundamentally dishonest never acknowledge their wrongfulness, or face reality?
I don't believe it is; knowing and saying you know are different things.

Even Goodell, I suspect, by this point knows that he is just wrong on the facts here, but won't admit it because he lacks the honesty to do so.
 

E5 Yaz

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Even Goodell, I suspect, by this point knows that he is just wrong on the facts here, but won't admit it because he lacks the honesty to do so.
Perhaps, but he also knows he's painted himself into a corner. By stretching this "challenge to his authority" out so far, to admit defeat now would be giving the hammer to the union before the next CBA. He has to see it through, even if he loses the court case.
 

PedroKsBambino

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Oh, completely agree. I think he'd risk being fired before he'd back down on this at this point---but that is different from him not actually realizing what went on.
 

Smiling Joe Hesketh

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I love how Kravitz justifies his making of the media rounds after his scorching hot takez last January....all while failing to mention that he got compensated for each and every one of them.

That was a non-apology apology and deep down he certainly doesn't think he did anything wrong. Mort just got bad info! Not my fault! He's right 99% of the time!

Fuck him. Not enough bad things can happen to his career.
 
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That was a non-apology apology and deep down he certainly doesn't think he did anything wrong. Mort just got bad info! Not my fault! He's right 99% of the time!

Fuck him. Not enough bad things can happen to his career.
Seriously. It might be nice to hear some genuine regret from these people but trying to shirk his responsibility with feigned ignorance is a joke. The guy made money and notoriety out of this by smearing other people's reputations. It would be more accurate to characterize an apology like this as "I wish it had all been correct" rather than "I'm sorry I was wrong."

Real reporting would take Mort's unsourced tweet and use it as leverage to extract the real, actual, juicy information about "the integrity of the game", which would have been fairly easy had there been any cheating going on. Of course, there wasn't, and as far as I can tell, most of these people playing reporters didn't bother to make any phone calls about it, with guys like Kravitz skipping that step and starting immediately with writing cheatriot fanfiction.

I can get my fill of hilarious and emotional overreactions to sports directly from other fans nowadays, and none of them are desecrating the grave of journalism when they do it. Thanks but no thanks.
 

geoduck no quahog

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Fuck him. Anyone else who totally fucked up their job would be fired, as Mortenson should have been. Otherwise these guys should call themselves gossip columnists and motor on.

It's this statement that gets me:

Someday, they’re going to do a 30-for-30 on this mess, talk about "the Deflator" and his weight loss, transient testing, Ted Wells, Tom Brady’s old phone, the whole mess. And I'll watch and laugh and remember the single most bizarre year of my professional life.
So Bob, make sure to mention that despite the science, there's still two items out there that make you think you were right, and therefore a journalist. Have a good laugh.
 

GeorgeCostanza

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Seriously. It might be nice to hear some genuine regret from these people but trying to shirk his responsibility with feigned ignorance is a joke. The guy made money and notoriety out of this by smearing other people's reputations. It would be more accurate to characterize an apology like this as "I wish it had all been correct" rather than "I'm sorry I was wrong."

Real reporting would take Mort's unsourced tweet and use it as leverage to extract the real, actual, juicy information about "the integrity of the game", which would have been fairly easy had there been any cheating going on. Of course, there wasn't, and as far as I can tell, most of these people playing reporters didn't bother to make any phone calls about it, with guys like Kravitz skipping that step and starting immediately with writing cheatriot fanfiction.

I can get my fill of hilarious and emotional overreactions to sports directly from other fans nowadays, and none of them are desecrating the grave of journalism when they do it. Thanks but no thanks.
Ain't that the truth. Very well put.

He says that if it were the Colts who were being investigated he would have run with that as well. How much ink did he devote to "noise-gate"?
 

m0ckduck

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I love how Kravitz justifies his making of the media rounds after his scorching hot takez last January....all while failing to mention that he got compensated for each and every one of them.
Indeed. What's irritating is that he wants it both ways with regards to social media:

I'm old enough to remember the days before social media, and lately I'm remembering them fondly. In those days, angry readers would call the office or send snail-mail screeds in block letters. Now, fans have 24/7 access to you, which is both the joy of social media and its curse.
Kravitz's ideal world would be one where he gets to tweet out inflammatory information that puts him profitably in the eye of the storm, but where complaints only come in by snail-mail. As Aaron Schatz commented about Kravitz at the time, (paraphrasing: ) you can't complain about a witch hunt when you're the one with torch and pitchfork in the front of the line.

Also: the internet can be a vile place, and I'm sure it's unpleasant to receive death threats... and, yet, it shows a real lack of awareness and journalistic professionalism on Kravitz's part to make his own freaking mistreatment the center of every follow-up column he writes about DFG. As though that's somehow newsworthy in and of itself. It goes hand in hand with the disingenuous false equivalency he creates with his whole 'nobody came out of this looking good' line:

I’ve never thought to celebrate one of the worst moments in sports – for the Patriots, for the NFL, for journalism and for me. Nobody came out of this mess looking terribly good, in my view. Nobody actually enjoyed it, except maybe some Patriots haters who were enjoying some schadenfreude.
... as though a million-dollar fine and a star player going to federal court to salvage his reputation is somehow equal collateral damage with Kravitz getting mean emails.
 

Eddie Jurak

canderson-lite
Lifetime Member
SoSH Member
Dec 12, 2002
43,005
Melrose, MA


@davidwade State Police confirm #NFL refs left the kicking balls at #Boston hotel before #Patriots - Chiefs game. Troopers drove them to Gillette.

@davidwade The #NFL refs forgetting the footballs & gauges at the hotel came almost exactly on the anniversary of the #deflategate game..