Beat The Clock

deythur

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I went to Youtube to try and get an idea of what this will look like and found this clip: View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z6PeI9FGRxY



It doesn't seem all that bad from a pace of play perspective but what really bothers me is seeing the clock. It creates a nervous tension that I don't need when watching a game. I assume it will on the screen somewhere but do we have any indication that it will be visible to the pitcher like this park and therefore in the view of the camera? I really don't like even looking at it and I assume that will fade away.
 

LogansDad

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I went to Youtube to try and get an idea of what this will look like and found this clip: View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z6PeI9FGRxY



It doesn't seem all that bad from a pace of play perspective but what really bothers me is seeing the clock. It creates a nervous tension that I don't need when watching a game. I assume it will on the screen somewhere but do we have any indication that it will be visible to the pitcher like this park and therefore in the view of the camera? I really don't like even looking at it and I assume that will fade away.
Might depend on the stadium, this is what I see on our local broadcast. The clock is over by the 3B dugout and not visible on screen (there is another clock in the outfield, as well).


61310
 

Red(s)HawksFan

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I went to Youtube to try and get an idea of what this will look like and found this clip: View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z6PeI9FGRxY



It doesn't seem all that bad from a pace of play perspective but what really bothers me is seeing the clock. It creates a nervous tension that I don't need when watching a game. I assume it will on the screen somewhere but do we have any indication that it will be visible to the pitcher like this park and therefore in the view of the camera? I really don't like even looking at it and I assume that will fade away.
At the minor league games I've attended where the pitch clock was in use, they were set up next to each dugout near the on deck area and in center field presumably so the HP ump and catcher can see it. There may have been more but none caught my eye and I forgot the clocks were even running after an inning or so. In fact, the only time I remember noticing the clocks at all once the game got going was the fact that they were turned off while Chris Sale was pitching (rehab start at Portland). Seems MLB pitchers were exempt or something.

I don't think any of the clocks will be visible from the standard CF camera at MLB parks. That camera can be off-set at some miLB/spring training parks but certainly not in any MLB park. I doubt they'll have a countdown clock on screen during telecasts either. Not unless there's a pitcher or hitter pushing the limits and it becomes part of the story of the game. I expect it will be an on-field thing only and TV viewers will forget it's even there unless an auto-ball or auto-strike is called.
 

JM3

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They show the 24 second shot clock in basketball on screen. I'm sure they'll show the pitch clock somewhere unobtrusive on the telecast with maybe a different color if it's running low.
 

allmanbro

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They show the 24 second shot clock in basketball on screen. I'm sure they'll show the pitch clock somewhere unobtrusive on the telecast with maybe a different color if it's running low.
I bet they do this at first, but i hope it fades into the background as everyone gets used to it. When replay review was new, mlbtv/gameday used to put up this big red alerts next to games undergoing a review, as if that was exciting. But that went away when the novelty was gone.
 

The_Dali

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Jul 2, 2021
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They show the 24 second shot clock in basketball on screen. I'm sure they'll show the pitch clock somewhere unobtrusive on the telecast with maybe a different color if it's running low.
I don’t think so. It isn’t really a part of the game the league wants to highlight with fans. Minor league I’ve attended have the clocks in discreet locations . I’d be surprised if it was shown as part of the normal Tv graphics package.

And I think it will be a huge benefit to the game.
 

Niastri

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My bet is they'll have it as a graphic, but it only shows up with like 3 seconds before the clock will expire.

Kind of like the shot clock starts to flash a little on some of the basketball broadcasts. If it isn't in play, it doesn't need to be on the screen.
 

LogansDad

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And I think it will be a huge benefit to the game.
I have said this a lot over the last year, and people here are probably sick of me saying it, but I can't emphasize enough how awesome the pitch clock is. I would honestly go so far as to call if life changing for baseball fans, and I couldn't be more excited that it made it to MLB so quickly. Theo is doing awesome, awesome things for this league and I hope it isn't too little, too late.
 

Sad Sam Jones

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I don’t think so. It isn’t really a part of the game the league wants to highlight with fans. Minor league I’ve attended have the clocks in discreet locations . I’d be surprised if it was shown as part of the normal Tv graphics package.

And I think it will be a huge benefit to the game.
Agreed. There are very logical reasons to display shot clocks and play clocks. They frequently become part of the game itself by being used for strategical reasons. That won't be the case with the pitch clock. There's no advantage for a pitcher to drain the clock and if they believed there was an advantage in "quick pitching" they would have been doing it before the clock.

Why bring attention to something that's purpose is only to improve pace of play? Especially when MLB's obvious hope is that it will quickly work by establishing habit and not require enforcement.
 

jon abbey

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Along similar lines, I feel like people did not fully appreciate the introduction of PitchCom last year, and this year they've updated it so now pitchers can be the ones to call pitches if they so choose. This eliminates/d a lot of the wasted time around attempted sign-stealing, and lets pitchers just focus on actually pitching.
 

JM3

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Not sure why broadcasts would minimize the excitement of whether a guy will get a pitch off in time & then have the audience be like oh, automatic ball/strike, what happened? Was it close?

It would be the same thing as just getting a whistle in basketball for a shot clock violation but not letting the audience in on the countdown so they can be hoping the guy will shoot or hoping for no shot in time.
 

Red(s)HawksFan

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Not sure why broadcasts would minimize the excitement of whether a guy will get a pitch off in time & then have the audience be like oh, automatic ball/strike, what happened? Was it close?

It would be the same thing as just getting a whistle in basketball for a shot clock violation but not letting the audience in on the countdown so they can be hoping the guy will shoot or hoping for no shot in time.
It's not like there's a buzzer that goes off when the clock runs out. If it's anything like the minor leagues that have implemented it, it's a fairly passive thing and umps usually give a bit of leeway. Like if the pitcher is in his windup, the ump is concentrating on watching the pitch not the clock. There aren't going to be any bang-bang, we-need-replay-to-verify kind of calls with this. It's only going to be the really egregious violations that trigger a call, like if the clock runs out and the pitcher is not even on the rubber or the batter is entirely out of the box.

I expect the auto-ball/strike calls will be a lot like balk calls. They'll be rare, and when they happen, the audience will be informed and maybe shown a replay with the clock visible.
 

Sad Sam Jones

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Not sure why broadcasts would minimize the excitement of whether a guy will get a pitch off in time & then have the audience be like oh, automatic ball/strike, what happened? Was it close?

It would be the same thing as just getting a whistle in basketball for a shot clock violation but not letting the audience in on the countdown so they can be hoping the guy will shoot or hoping for no shot in time.
If that's your idea of excitement and something you want to see, I hate to break it to you, but MLB is striving to disappoint you. They're introducing the clock to improve pace of play, not to add some new layer of difficulty or drama. The goal is that pitchers quicken their pace habitually and soon no one notices what's enforcing it. They aren't hoping for violations and controversy. There are also plenty of things that umpires already enforce without something on the screen to immediately show us.
 

JM3

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The point of the NBA shot clock was the exact same in terms of pace of play. People still find it to be dramatic when time runs out, though.

& there's leniency in football prior to a delay of game being called & there is no buzzer & officials keep track of lots of things that aren't immediately on the screen.

Now the argument may be "well baseball is different than other sports", but I don't think baseball wants to be that different from the 2 most successful sports in America, which is a big part of why they're implementing rule changes to increase action & pace of play.

I have a feeling it will end up on the screen down the road even if they don't put it on the to start, but who knows?
 

JM3

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If that's your idea of excitement and something you want to see, I hate to break it to you, but MLB is striving to disappoint you. They're introducing the clock to improve pace of play, not to add some new layer of difficulty or drama. The goal is that pitchers quicken their pace habitually and soon no one notices what's enforcing it. They aren't hoping for violations and controversy. There are also plenty of things that umpires already enforce without something on the screen to immediately show us.
View: https://twitter.com/Jared_Carrabis/status/1629217467171045382?cxt=HHwWjIC8ifGpkpwtAAAA
 

LogansDad

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Totally.
They are obviously pitching faster than the clock and not everyonewill. But this is great.
I think the pitchers will really be using it to their advantage, especially with runners on base. Letting it get down to 1 or even 2 seconds gives a huge advantage to the runner, and pitching earlier prevents the batter from having any ability to dictate the at bat.
 

BaseballJones

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Pitchers are going to tire more quickly at that pace. Which means they won’t exert as much effort on each pitch. Which means we will see a drop in velocity. Which means we will see more contact. Which, given the changes in the shift rules, means we should see a LOT more action.

Which means…way better and more interesting baseball.
 

Bergs

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I would like to get any thoughts from people who have seen this in the minors. Does it work?
 

JM3

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I saw a few Las Vegas Aviators games last season & didn't really notice it & had a good time with the wife & kids & some friends at the game...so I assume so?
 

beautokyo

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I don't know.....just watching that DO clip got me a little antsy. Seems so rushed now...... What's the hourly price per value now? Seat prices go up, vending prices go up....time at the ball park go down. I mean.....fine, I'll never go to a game in the States again anyways most likely but it still makes me a pinch uncomfortable. Maybe it's just me.
 

Red(s)HawksFan

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I don't know.....just watching that DO clip got me a little antsy. Seems so rushed now...... What's the hourly price per value now? Seat prices go up, vending prices go up....time at the ball park go down. I mean.....fine, I'll never go to a game in the States again anyways most likely but it still makes me a pinch uncomfortable. Maybe it's just me.
It's you. Went to a couple minor league games last summer and it felt no different than any other game I've attended. No, I take that back. It was better than the last couple games I've attended at Fenway where things dragged at times.

I love being at the ballpark but by the same token, I don't need to be there for four plus hours to feel like I got a full experience. A crisp, well played game is entertaining whether it is over in two hours or three and a half.
 

Rovin Romine

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It's you. Went to a couple minor league games last summer and it felt no different than any other game I've attended. No, I take that back. It was better than the last couple games I've attended at Fenway where things dragged at times.

I love being at the ballpark but by the same token, I don't need to be there for four plus hours to feel like I got a full experience. A crisp, well played game is entertaining whether it is over in two hours or three and a half.
Also most people are watching/listening from home. If you want to grow the fan base, the games are better when they have a briskness in flow to them, no matter how long the game lasts.
 

YTF

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I don't know.....just watching that DO clip got me a little antsy. Seems so rushed now...... What's the hourly price per value now? Seat prices go up, vending prices go up....time at the ball park go down. I mean.....fine, I'll never go to a game in the States again anyways most likely but it still makes me a pinch uncomfortable. Maybe it's just me.
This is a pretty interesting question. If the average time per game is lessened by 30-60 minutes, that's a shitload of lost concessions.
 
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BaseballJones

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This is a pretty interesting question. If the average time per game is lessened from 30-60 minutes, that's a shitload of lost concessions.
BUT...maybe more people will want to come to the park? Maybe more people will tune in on television, which will mean more revenue for the broadcasters (with increased advertising prices), which will mean they will pay more for the TV package, which will mean more revenue for the teams?
 

JimD

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This is a pretty interesting question. If the average time per game is lessened from 30-60 minutes, that's a shitload of lost concessions.
Definitely less time to sell beer.
 

YTF

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BUT...maybe more people will want to come to the park? Maybe more people will tune in on television, which will mean more revenue for the broadcasters (with increased advertising prices), which will mean they will pay more for the TV package, which will mean more revenue for the teams?
Perhaps, but a lot also depends how these corporations are set up. For example, take the Red Sox. Fenway Sports Group, NESN, The Boston Red Sox there are different concerns in play here.
 

YTF

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Random thought as I'm watching the MLB Network after the Sox vs Braves. There's a lot going on with this pitch count. The home plate ump needs to facilitate 15, 20 and 30 second intervals in regards to the pitcher and the 8 second "ready and focused" aspect regarding the hitter. I don't think we're going to be seeing robo umps anytime soon.
 

brienc

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This is a pretty interesting question. If the average time per game is lessened from 30-60 minutes, that's a shitload of lost concessions.
Madison Square Garden has been offering half priced food and soft drink concessions between 6pm and 6:30pm before concerts the last few years. I loved it because it gave me a reason to go in early and avoid getting crushed trying to get through security at showtime. Perhaps MLB clubs could offer something like that to entice folks to arrive early.
 

MuzzyField

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Random thought as I'm watching the MLB Network after the Sox vs Braves. There's a lot going on with this pitch count. The home plate ump needs to facilitate 15, 20 and 30 second intervals in regards to the pitcher and the 8 second "ready and focused" aspect regarding the hitter. I don't think we're going to be seeing robo umps anytime soon.
I do.

The robots are all about accurately calling the location of the pitch relative to the strike zone. Not seeing the conflict.

Thankfully, the robots will allow Angel Hernandez to fully focus on the clock.
 

Hendu for Kutch

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I think as long as the batter is in the box, that should satisfy their time requirement. We don't need judgement calls about whether they're "alert" to the pitcher.

If they're in the box, they can be pitched to. No need for the ambiguity. If they are pitched to when they're not looking, that's their problem.