SOSH Running Dogs

TallerThanPedroia

Civilly Disobedient
SoSH Member
Jul 19, 2005
17,546
Boston
I was going to ask who was there.

You qualify every year, right mate?
Mostly, but I am not currently qualified for 2020, so if I don't BQ on Monday, I'll have to do it somewhere else before September. But I always run for Dana-Farber anyway so I can still get a bib through them if I need it.
 

GreenMountain

Member
SoSH Member
Nov 4, 2007
122
Maine
How was it out there today?
Weather was not as bad as 2016 and 2017 but still warm and humid. 18 Celsius probably sounds delightfully cool to an Australian, but it sucked when most of my training was in sub-0 temps. Would have preferred about 4 degrees, but it was manageable with cloud cover most of the way. My highest volume training cycle (1414 miles since early December) paid off with a 2:36:08 finish, which was a 13 minute PR and good enough for first finisher from Maine (out of about 150). 238 overall in the race. Carried tailwind in a running belt, which was unconventional for a road race with aid stops every mile, but I can't stand Gatorade. Worked perfectly. Good day. I can barely walk now but don't care.
 

SydneySox

A dash of cool to add the heat
SoSH Member
Sep 19, 2005
15,605
The Eastern Suburbs
Holy shit you're fast, mate.

18 would be a nice temp for a run, yes, I'd enjoy that. It was 26 for me on my long run on the weekend.

Your volume since December is incredible. You're talking 150+km a week. How is that even possible?
 

TallerThanPedroia

Civilly Disobedient
SoSH Member
Jul 19, 2005
17,546
Boston
Weather was not as bad as 2016 and 2017 but still warm and humid. 18 Celsius probably sounds delightfully cool to an Australian, but it sucked when most of my training was in sub-0 temps. Would have preferred about 4 degrees, but it was manageable with cloud cover most of the way. My highest volume training cycle (1414 miles since early December) paid off with a 2:36:08 finish, which was a 13 minute PR and good enough for first finisher from Maine (out of about 150). 238 overall in the race. Carried tailwind in a running belt, which was unconventional for a road race with aid stops every mile, but I can't stand Gatorade. Worked perfectly. Good day. I can barely walk now but don't care.
YOU'RE AMAZING

I gave up on qualifying after ten miles and ended up with 3:21. Just got too hot. But I stayed on my feet unlike a lot of people. And I had a lot of fun playing with the crowd in the last third.
 

SydneySox

A dash of cool to add the heat
SoSH Member
Sep 19, 2005
15,605
The Eastern Suburbs
You have to do a bit over 20k a day.
Yes, but that's not what he'd have been doing. He'd be doing like 10 one day, 40 the next, etc, varying distance. It's the life drain that astounds me. I fight my family tooth and nail to get five hours on a weekend for a long run every single week. I barely maintain 60km a week and that's pushing my luck every single week. And that's just the time drain. GM's body must be a well oiled machine.

Incredible.
 

GreenMountain

Member
SoSH Member
Nov 4, 2007
122
Maine
At the peak I was going over 150km/week and running a minimum of 16km/day. Did that through January and again in most of March. A lot of that was easy miles, but mixed in 2 workouts and 1 long run (32+km) and 1 mid-long run (~24km) every week. I work from home most of the time and do a lot of my work in the evenings after everyone has gone to bed. This allows me to pick optimal times during the day to get out and get the miles in, which is important in the middle of winter in Maine. Weekends can definitely be tough trying to fit it all in, but my family is great about it and I try to do my weekend long runs as early as possible (though I suck at early runs) to minimize the impact on family time.
 

SydneySox

A dash of cool to add the heat
SoSH Member
Sep 19, 2005
15,605
The Eastern Suburbs
I also suck at early runs! Sadly, middle of the day over Dec-Feb in Sydney is unrunnable with the humidity and heat of summer so I did a lot of 3.30/4am runs during those months. I have been doing 60/70km a week and barely surviving though!
 

Joe Sixpack

Well-Known Member
Lifetime Member
SoSH Member
Sep 9, 2002
4,917
Canton, MA
I peaked around 70km/week when I was half marathon training and yeah, it was barely surviving for me too. I have a hard time getting going early in the morning for long runs too.

Running in summer in Massachusetts is uncomfortable but I can tolerate it if it's under 30 degrees C, just need to hydrate and wear a lightweight hat for some shade. But my max long run is about 24-25km, for marathon and longer I'm sure you guys are doing longer. I pretty much don't go past 2 to 2.5 hours for a long run (for a half - haven't done a full marathon in a long time)
 

SydneySox

A dash of cool to add the heat
SoSH Member
Sep 19, 2005
15,605
The Eastern Suburbs
Yeah I have just entered taper (yay!) and did 30/35/42 last three weekends.

Sadly because of finding the time around kid stuff I couldn’t organise to go with anyone and it was fuuuuuucking boring.

Today I cruised 20 and it felt amazing.
 

RetractableRoof

tolerates intolerance
Lifetime Member
SoSH Member
Dec 1, 2003
3,260
Quincy, MA
Hey guys, I've stayed out of this thread generally because I have nothing to add, and my knees and joints are no longer happy with me putting extra wear on them. I'm going to beat my body up, I tend to do it in the dojo :). That said, I recently made a sign for a relative to capture his first Boston finish. I've changed the names on this version, but these are the two versions I gave his mom to pick from. If anyone here is interested (either for themselves or for a gift), let me know. I can customize them in anyway that you'd like, it's what I do - I've been thinking to create a version with military boots instead of running shoes. Incidently it also doesn't have to be the Boston, or even this year.

I apologize if this feels intrusive/spammy - if you'd like me to delete the post, I'm happy to do so.


 

Patek's 3 Dingers

Luddite
Silver Supporter
Jul 5, 2018
430
Here's my marathon story. I ran seriously in HS and college and my 5/10K times were equivalent to the low 2:20s for a marathon. At the time, college runners rarely ran marathons and neither did I.

In my late 30s I had the opportunity to coach a Team-in-Training group. The director of T.I.T. in Sacramento was troubled by my never having run a marathon and insisted that I run the CIM, which was a week later. I had run very little during the previous 6 months, but muscle memory made 6:30 pace feel really easy. At 15 miles I felt great and had a plan to accelerate at the 20 mile mark. At 18 miles I wasn't so sure about my plan and by 20 the wheels had fallen off. I slowed down to around 8:00 pace and finished with a 2:58. My friends said I looked like on of those 300 pound linemen that picks up a fumble and runs out of gas before he reaches the end zone.

It was an interesting experience. Racing in XC/Track was about oxygen debt and heart rates up to 200 bpm. When I was cranking out my 8:00 miles during my maratjon, my heart rate had to be well below 100 bpm, but I could barely move my legs. That was my last and only marathon.
 

SydneySox

A dash of cool to add the heat
SoSH Member
Sep 19, 2005
15,605
The Eastern Suburbs
Did my 50miler a couple months ago - was a great run. About an hour slower than I wanted but was cramping in every single muscle for the last 10 and had to walk that bit in.

Have been quite sick since, with two different viral cold things and a severe bout of asthma that running actually helped to kill off. Went on some powerful drugs to stop that one, too. On the weekend, did my first race since the big one, a little 22km bush thing with some decent vert up on our Central Coast, and really opened the throttle and raced it the whole way. Snuck into the top 50, which was nice. Still a good 25 minutes behind the lead pack. It felt great to open up and just run fast; all the training I did over summrer, then the big run, then recovery and sickness, I don't think I've tried to race anything since a half marathon late last year. Sometimes it's nice to be off a specific training plan and just running whatever.
 

bohous

Member
SoSH Member
Jul 21, 2005
3,210
Framingham
So I set 2 modest goals for myself for the spring/summer. To run a 5k in <:28min and a 10K in <1hr.
In June I did my 5K with a time of 26:53
This weekend I did my first 10K with an official time of 56:28.

I understand these aren't exactly impressive paces for most of you guys but I'm pretty excited as a midlife crisis runner who has only been running somewhat regularly for a couple of years.
However, as happy as I am with these times, I also acknowledge that they are kind of bullshit. All of my races, including both of these, were manually timed where they tear the tag off of the bib at the finish line. I am certain my 10k time in particular was generous by at least a full minute. There was a 60yo woman who basically carried me the last half mile. I couldn't catch her and I finished just a few steps behind. She ran through the finish gate initially and had to quickly come back to have her tag taken off of her bib after mine. I made a point to tell them to be sure to file her tag in ahead of mine. The results came out and they had her finishing almost a full minute behind me. It doesn't really matter (except that it sets the bar high for my PB) but I'm curious as to how these times are actually tracked with this type of system? They just take the tags when you finish and stack them but how do they sync the actual time with the bib? There were almost 200 runners in the 10K event and this seems like a very archaic and unreliable method.
 

SydneySox

A dash of cool to add the heat
SoSH Member
Sep 19, 2005
15,605
The Eastern Suburbs
Yeah, it is, but that's probably for a few reasons.

First, great run - that's an awesome achievement. Hitting our goals is always awesome.

For the reasons - the timing was probably done by volunteers for an event that didn't matter to anyone's ITRA or qualification chances and, this is the most important, just about everyone wears a watch now and does their own timing. 200 runners is a tiny event, like a Parkrun, and they're not investing in race mats and timing chips for something like that. Did you pay a for-profit company for that race? Probably not...

That's a great 10k time, and you should now try for a half!
 

bohous

Member
SoSH Member
Jul 21, 2005
3,210
Framingham
Thanks. I totally understand this is just a fun run and why they wouldn't spring for the chips. I did have my watch but forgot to stop it at the line but I know I was likely over :57min based on the clock and where my watch was when I finally remembered.
I guess I'm just wondering what the process is with he manual system. I haven't really paid attention. Is there 1 person just writing down times in order as people cross the line, then they take the tags and hope they match up in order? Again, its not a big deal but I know the times and places were clearly off here.

Oh and yes, the goal for next year is a half as long as my aging knees hold up.
 

SydneySox

A dash of cool to add the heat
SoSH Member
Sep 19, 2005
15,605
The Eastern Suburbs
At Parkrun they use a system where someone calls out the time as the runner crosses the line, and someone writes that time against the next available number, 1 to 300 or whatever, and the runner is handed that chit. They then scan the runner's barcode (you carry a barcode that you need to print off) and note the number; the system cross references it.

It gets messy when a swag of runners all hit the line together, but again, it's volunteers and anyone hoping for an officially accurate time would be paying for it or using their watch.
 

SydneySox

A dash of cool to add the heat
SoSH Member
Sep 19, 2005
15,605
The Eastern Suburbs
Hey, I'm having some fun and joining a 4 person marathon relay team on Sunday morning.

2 men, 2 women. 10 x 4km loops, and one 2.2km loop to start it all off.

Wondering what you guys think is the best approach. We are thinking...

Runner A - 2.2

Runner B - 4
Runner C - 4
Runner D - 4
Runner A -4

B-4
C-4
D-4
A-4

B-4
C-4

Should we do it that, and smash out 4, then rest, then smash it out, then rest and two people smash it out again? Or go A/A and do 8? It's an intriguing dilemma.

We are all friends but none of us have ever done this type of race before.
 

Time to Mo Vaughn

RIP Dernell
SoSH Member
Mar 24, 2008
4,889
Hey, I'm having some fun and joining a 4 person marathon relay team on Sunday morning.

2 men, 2 women. 10 x 4km loops, and one 2.2km loop to start it all off.

Wondering what you guys think is the best approach. We are thinking...

Runner A - 2.2

Runner B - 4
Runner C - 4
Runner D - 4
Runner A -4

B-4
C-4
D-4
A-4

B-4
C-4

Should we do it that, and smash out 4, then rest, then smash it out, then rest and two people smash it out again? Or go A/A and do 8? It's an intriguing dilemma.

We are all friends but none of us have ever done this type of race before.
What's your goal here? Fastest possible time? Does everyone need to do the same mileage except for the one person with the extra 2.2?
 

SydneySox

A dash of cool to add the heat
SoSH Member
Sep 19, 2005
15,605
The Eastern Suburbs
You'll see two of us are doing 12km (3 x 4km loops), one is doing 10.4 km (the opener plus 2 4km loops) and the last is doing 8km (2 loops).

Given that, yes we're trying to smash it.
 

SydneySox

A dash of cool to add the heat
SoSH Member
Sep 19, 2005
15,605
The Eastern Suburbs
It's also fun, but we're all multi ultra runners who don't tend to do short distances like this and we all want to try and open up a little! In the name of fun. But also running hard, which we never do.

And fun.
 

GreenMountain

Member
SoSH Member
Nov 4, 2007
122
Maine
It's also fun, but we're all multi ultra runners who don't tend to do short distances like this and we all want to try and open up a little! In the name of fun. But also running hard, which we never do.

And fun.
Having done both ways, I think the fastest method is for for everyone to run twice. Running once is easier because you only have to warm up and cool down once, but you will be faster overall if you break it up. Assuming everyone is good about rolling it out, staying loose, and warming up before each segment.
 

GreenMountain

Member
SoSH Member
Nov 4, 2007
122
Maine
Thanks - what about three times though? Two warm up and cool downs?
Yeah I still think the same principle applies. Only caveat is that endurance runners are often not the best about warm-up, strides, etc. to get going for the short fast stuff. Would have to be disciplined about that and good pacing for all three attempts.
 

bohous

Member
SoSH Member
Jul 21, 2005
3,210
Framingham
Finished my first half-marathon yesterday and pretty happy with my results, but still have room for improvement.

26366


My realistic goal was 2:10 so I can't complain. I cruised through the first 6mi and was on pace for a sub 2hr finish. I was at :58min at the half-way water stop and BAM, big effing hill. The second half felt like it was all uphill and I just didn't have a lot in the tank to kick up my pace the last 3 miles like I had hoped. I think with a flatter course I can beat the 2hr mark. I'm still really happy and have to admit it was satisfying passing walkers half my age those last few miles.
 

rbeaud

Member
SoSH Member
Jul 15, 2005
309
Orange, CT
Finished my first half-marathon yesterday and pretty happy with my results, but still have room for improvement.
Congratulations! The great part about your first race is that you get an automatic PB. The next, better part, is you have an improved feel for the distance and what you can accomplish.

Find another race, train, and beat the competition. Which is, at the end of the day, always yourself.
 

SydneySox

A dash of cool to add the heat
SoSH Member
Sep 19, 2005
15,605
The Eastern Suburbs
Good job on the half, mate. My favourite distance.

I did the marathon relay. It was a lot of fun! It got hot quickly, hitting 28c by 8am, with the race starting at 7am. I did the three legs, and it was funny to see my 4km loops all essentially had the same times - 16.04/16.25/16.01 - with the fastest the last which I get because I was holding back a little in the other two knowing more was to come. I went the wrong way in the first loop, too, costing me about 20 seconds! I was out in my normal spot, nowhere near the front 3 runners but leading the middle of the pack, and we came to a loop and I went left, everyone else went right... normally people follow you the wrong way but not this time.

A really fun way to spend a sunday morning.
 

Jerrygarciaparra

My kid has superpowers
SoSH Member
Jul 31, 2001
3,222
Montpelier, VT
So do any of you running dogs actually run with a dog? We just got a beagle boxer mix with a ton of energy and I’d like to take her with me on my morning run

Anything I need to know? I’d keep her on leash
 

fiskful of dollars

Member
SoSH Member
Jul 14, 2005
1,972
Charlottesville, VA
Oh yeah. I run w/ my chocolate lab. She's a great training partner. I usually do my long recovery runs with her. We do the first 5mi together...lots of swimming and pee stops. Keeps me from going out too hard. I do the remainder on my own but by then I'm loose and warmed up.

Most dogs will let you know when they are tired but you'll wanna learn the signs to avoid injury or fatigue. They are also insane and liable to pull and drag you. It's really important to take the time to teach them to run WITH you at your pace so they don't pull, bolt or choke themselves. My girl runs in front of me with the leash taut but doesn't pull or bolt (takes some training). When she drops beside me or starts lagging, she's done for the day. We have a few nice lakes she can jump into for a break too.

One thing: holding a leash can alter YOUR gait a bit so be mindful of that to avoid injury/stress, etc. It's such a great bonding thing for both of you to do.
 
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Jerrygarciaparra

My kid has superpowers
SoSH Member
Jul 31, 2001
3,222
Montpelier, VT
I took her into our wooded park this morning and did 2.5 miles on the trails. She was off leash for most of it and behaved well. Ran around like a maniac but always came running to me if I got out of sight. Came when she was called. Never even had to give her the treats in my pocket.
 

The Napkin

wise ass al kaprielian
Dope
SoSH Member
Jul 13, 2002
23,743
right here
So on a whim I signed up for a "virtual" 5K a brewery was doing a month or so ago. It .. wasn't awful? I've done a couple more since and .. don't hate it?

I'm not a runner. I'll never be a runner. I don't have a runner's body. For now I walk more than I run. But I'm "doing" a 5K every weekend and I kind of like doing these and it's a good way for me to get a little activity in and might maybe even lead to me getting in better shape. I actually have signed up for a 10K next fall and am looking forward to doing it and I think that's a reasonable thing to do.

But the point of all of this is that I'm now at the point where I think I need to throw a little money at it. I'm okay with that but I'd like to buy what I need and not waste money, ya know? SO ---

* My tennis shoes are 10 years old if they're a week. I'd like to get a decent pair. I will be doing all of the walking/running on sidewalks around the city. Is it worth going to Marthon Sports and getting a gait thing done?

* It's December in Boston. For now I've been fine wearing shorts and a hoodie. But it's going to get cold. I'm thinking about a pair of these. I'm not sure I want/need tight type things or are they wort it? I have some compression underwear that I think I like that are helping the chafing and the boys. Anything to think about for that? I'm basically okay with the t-shirt and hoody but will I want a better top layer for when it's colder? something like thermal underwear type thing?

* anything else that are handy little things to have?
GPS? - I just use my little fitbit watch which seems to be working fine, not sure I need anything fancier than that. I don't really care about times or splits or whatever. I know how far 2.5K is from home. I get to there. I turn around. I come home.
I'll probably buy a wallet that I can just put my id/credit card/insurance card in
other handy little gadget or things?

I throw myself to your mercy...
 

Preacher

Member
SoSH Member
Jun 9, 2006
3,081
Harker Heights, TX
So on a whim I signed up for a "virtual" 5K a brewery was doing a month or so ago. It .. wasn't awful? I've done a couple more since and .. don't hate it?

I'm not a runner. I'll never be a runner. I don't have a runner's body. For now I walk more than I run. But I'm "doing" a 5K every weekend and I kind of like doing these and it's a good way for me to get a little activity in and might maybe even lead to me getting in better shape. I actually have signed up for a 10K next fall and am looking forward to doing it and I think that's a reasonable thing to do.

But the point of all of this is that I'm now at the point where I think I need to throw a little money at it. I'm okay with that but I'd like to buy what I need and not waste money, ya know? SO ---

* My tennis shoes are 10 years old if they're a week. I'd like to get a decent pair. I will be doing all of the walking/running on sidewalks around the city. Is it worth going to Marthon Sports and getting a gait thing done?

* It's December in Boston. For now I've been fine wearing shorts and a hoodie. But it's going to get cold. I'm thinking about a pair of these. I'm not sure I want/need tight type things or are they wort it? I have some compression underwear that I think I like that are helping the chafing and the boys. Anything to think about for that? I'm basically okay with the t-shirt and hoody but will I want a better top layer for when it's colder? something like thermal underwear type thing?

* anything else that are handy little things to have?
GPS? - I just use my little fitbit watch which seems to be working fine, not sure I need anything fancier than that. I don't really care about times or splits or whatever. I know how far 2.5K is from home. I get to there. I turn around. I come home.
I'll probably buy a wallet that I can just put my id/credit card/insurance card in
other handy little gadget or things?

I throw myself to your mercy...
I got the latest shoes I'm running in at Fleet Feet. They actually scanned my feet and from that determined a couple different options. I think it's worth it to go to a running store and getting a knowledgeable person to help you get shoes that work for you and your running style. Also, get a few pairs of decent socks.

In colder weather, I wear something similar to what you posted on my legs. I don't do the tights so I'm not sure how well they work. I'm sure more serious runners prefer them. I also have a few jackets that are designed for running and have a bit of reflection on them. Plus, their mostly water proof. If it's really cold, I wear a long sleeve shirt under my jacket. You might want to think about some gloves. I have some pearl izumi ones that I like. Also, you may want something to cover your head/ears. I recommend avoiding cotton.

As far as chafing, invest in some body glide. It comes in a deodorant type container and you just rub it anywhere you might chafe. Works great.

Based on what you're saying, whatever watch you like is fine with whatever functionality you want. But, if you just keep doing the same route, that's fine. Before I had a GPS watch, I would just map my runs to figure out what route I needed to take to get the distance I wanted. For the ID/credit card, all my jackets have a zipper pocket. If I'm going tshirt and shorts, my shorts have pockets (granted this isn't very secure). But they have devices that will hold your phone and a few cards that straps around your arm. They also make small, stretchy fanny pack things, looks like a black belt, and it goes around your waist. Ultimately, you might have to try a few things to find out what's comfortable for you.
 

fiskful of dollars

Member
SoSH Member
Jul 14, 2005
1,972
Charlottesville, VA
So on a whim I signed up for a "virtual" 5K a brewery was doing a month or so ago. It .. wasn't awful? I've done a couple more since and .. don't hate it?

I'm not a runner. I'll never be a runner. I don't have a runner's body. For now I walk more than I run. But I'm "doing" a 5K every weekend and I kind of like doing these and it's a good way for me to get a little activity in and might maybe even lead to me getting in better shape. I actually have signed up for a 10K next fall and am looking forward to doing it and I think that's a reasonable thing to do.

But the point of all of this is that I'm now at the point where I think I need to throw a little money at it. I'm okay with that but I'd like to buy what I need and not waste money, ya know? SO ---

* My tennis shoes are 10 years old if they're a week. I'd like to get a decent pair. I will be doing all of the walking/running on sidewalks around the city. Is it worth going to Marthon Sports and getting a gait thing done?

* It's December in Boston. For now I've been fine wearing shorts and a hoodie. But it's going to get cold. I'm thinking about a pair of these. I'm not sure I want/need tight type things or are they wort it? I have some compression underwear that I think I like that are helping the chafing and the boys. Anything to think about for that? I'm basically okay with the t-shirt and hoody but will I want a better top layer for when it's colder? something like thermal underwear type thing?

* anything else that are handy little things to have?
GPS? - I just use my little fitbit watch which seems to be working fine, not sure I need anything fancier than that. I don't really care about times or splits or whatever. I know how far 2.5K is from home. I get to there. I turn around. I come home.
I'll probably buy a wallet that I can just put my id/credit card/insurance card in
other handy little gadget or things?

I throw myself to your mercy...

Congratulations! Running is amazing. Goodonya.
Preacher is right on. Definitely get Body Glide, a good running shoe evaluation, and good shoes. Moisture wicking clothing is super helpful. Cotton t-shirts and hoodies are going to get wet, heavy and uncomfortable. I'm in NoVA and only wear tights/long bottoms when the temp gets below 15-20. Gloves and a hat are key in cold weather. Your fitbit prob collects a fair amount of data but a running watch can give you enormous amounts of useful info- maybe a bit much initially BUT you'll eventually wanna know your pace, gradient, cadence, heart rate and other metrics. I'm a Garmin guy...I have a Fenix 6 which is amazing. Garmin has a whole line of watches to fit every need/budget. Sunglasses are a good idea too. Likewise - reflective stuff if you run at night. I have a headlight from Black Diamond.

Injury: It happens to ALL runners. A foam roller can really help work out sore spots and keep muscles (ahem) pliable and loose. Warm up well. Fight against the urge to increase either intensity and mileage too quickly. Plan to increase no more than about 10% per week in either intensity/duration. I don't carry anything with me when I run but use a race belt for triathlons and have one called Spibelt which can hold a TON of stuff, including a smartphone. Good Luck!...Happy to answer any qs and welcome to the club!
 

bigq

Member
SoSH Member
Jul 15, 2005
6,059
On very cold days I prefer running tights to loose fitting fleece pants. I never thought I would be into spandex but now I am a convert despite being teased relentlessly by my wife and kids.

Speaking of cold weather running, Darn Tough makes the best winter running socks that I have found. A bit on the expensive side but they are durable and hold up well. I have a couple of pairs that I’ve been using for going on five years now. They are guaranteed for life and if you are dissatisfied you can return them at any time for another pair but I haven’t tested that yet. Their ultra lightweight warm weather socks are probably great as well but I haven’t tried them.

 

rbeaud

Member
SoSH Member
Jul 15, 2005
309
Orange, CT
Hey glad you are all still here :)

So on a whim I signed up for a "virtual" 5K a brewery was doing a month or so ago. It .. wasn't awful? I've done a couple more since and .. don't hate it?

I'm not a runner. I'll never be a runner. I don't have a runner's body. For now I walk more than I run. But I'm "doing" a 5K every weekend and I kind of like doing these and it's a good way for me to get a little activity in and might maybe even lead to me getting in better shape. I actually have signed up for a 10K next fall and am looking forward to doing it and I think that's a reasonable thing to do.

But the point of all of this is that I'm now at the point where I think I need to throw a little money at it. I'm okay with that but I'd like to buy what I need and not waste money, ya know? SO ---

* My tennis shoes are 10 years old if they're a week. I'd like to get a decent pair. I will be doing all of the walking/running on sidewalks around the city. Is it worth going to Marthon Sports and getting a gait thing done?

* It's December in Boston. For now I've been fine wearing shorts and a hoodie. But it's going to get cold. I'm thinking about a pair of these. I'm not sure I want/need tight type things or are they wort it? I have some compression underwear that I think I like that are helping the chafing and the boys. Anything to think about for that? I'm basically okay with the t-shirt and hoody but will I want a better top layer for when it's colder? something like thermal underwear type thing?

* anything else that are handy little things to have?
GPS? - I just use my little fitbit watch which seems to be working fine, not sure I need anything fancier than that. I don't really care about times or splits or whatever. I know how far 2.5K is from home. I get to there. I turn around. I come home.
I'll probably buy a wallet that I can just put my id/credit card/insurance card in
other handy little gadget or things?

I throw myself to your mercy...
By and large, I think you will "know" when more stuff is required. I returned to running years ago with a cheap Timex, measured the miles via car odometer, wore Champion basketball (gym) shorts, an old pair of sneakers, and cotton t's. I would run with ambient down into the 20's in only shorts & shirt. So you don't need anything, though you might want to think about how to be comfortable and even ways to make it more enjoyable. Shoes...those are the only must-have for anyone wanting regular running. My wife loves the folks at Marathon; we just about have to visit whenever in town. I'm confident they will treat you well and help with a good shoe choice. Socks are very nearly required to keep feet comfortable. My favorite are Balega Hidden Comfort...so many colors!

I think the days of buying your own technical shirts are gone once road races resume. Definitely try one and you will probably realize why cotton is old skool. In NE, you can even find fall/winter races that offer long sleeve tech shirts too! I have so many that a chunk had to go for Goodwill or car fixing. You may want to consider some technical shorts. Brooks with the 2-4" inseam my go-to for racing. I also have Asics & New Balance for general training and our kids rave about Nike DryFit. Lately, I've mixed in Lululemon...what can I say, the ladies in my life convinced me to try. Their shorts tend to have deep pockets or even zippers (velcro "dies" after a while) to hold something more than a hotel key when I travel. For the winter, again ditch the cotton which can get heavy with sweat (surely you remember frozen pants as a kid???). I do have some windpants and use them regularly though have generally become a convert to running tights. Can't say enough about Sugoi Firewall; good and thick for those really bitter days, have ankle zippers, and even a hip pocket (Lulu is too thin for anything past fall in my opinion). Don't forget a hat or even a headband (ears warm, head able to radiate heat...I get hot except on the coldest of days), check out TrailHeads. Bitter days call for a balaclava to protect your face. In winter I use tech shirts to layer and all the major brands have covers (I like the quarter-zip type for airflow if required).

Like many, I graduated to a running computer (GPS watch) when it became more interesting to know RIGHT DARN NOW how fast I'm running...that and I could confirm today was faster than yesterday. I've since relaxed a little ;) Used up the batteries on several Garmin Forerunner 305s, then a 910xt, and my current toy is a Fenix 5S (all our kids swear by Apple Watches). So much valuable data like various pace metrics, elevation gain, heart rate, and even steps per mile (plenty of useless data too). These days my watch face only displays total miles and total time. I still check on resting heart rate (a good measure of becoming overworked if it goes up day after day) and the race face shows each mile (sometimes kilometer). Most watches can handle e-pay for unexpected water or nutrition breaks. The running computer is totally unnecessary, though it does save me from carrying a phone (which I despise).

Finally, never be afraid to take a break if something doesn't feel right. Returning to running a day late is better than a day early. If it hurts after a mile...stop. I've got a balky ankle from "running through it" that was completely preventable with a bit of common sense!