Red Sox sign Masataka Yoshida

koufax32

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Wait a second, Boggs lives in Tampa? Do you think it’s too creepy to show up at his front door wearing his jersey, asking if he wants to hang out or have a catch? Asking for a friend…
 

Rovin Romine

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Wait a second, Boggs lives in Tampa? Do you think it’s too creepy to show up at his front door wearing his jersey, asking if he wants to hang out or have a catch? Asking for a friend…
I have a couple of slots open if your friend ends up needing criminal defense.

Also, if the fact-pattern involves a bucket of fried chicken, a cardboard box, and a stick with a string tied to it, I can't promise I'd do it for free. But I'd seriously consider it.
 

bosockboy

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I have a couple of slots open if your friend ends up needing criminal defense.

Also, if the fact-pattern involves a bucket of fried chicken, a cardboard box, and a stick with a string tied to it, I can't promise I'd do it for free. But I'd seriously consider it.
Or a Margo Adams mask.
 

TFisNEXT

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He just wants him to get a good night's sleep.

Boggs walked a lot, too. It's harder to get 2 hits in a game when you're losing 2 at bats to walks.
Had 4 straight seasons with over 100 walks and 5 additional seasons with over 85 walks.

Makes Ted Williams even more impressive. He walked even more than Boggs and had all those multi-hit games in a row.
 

joe dokes

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Big win for Bloom against all the Keith Law’s that mocked this signing.
I don't read too much of the popular prognosticators. Do they ever go back and say "missed that one. Here's where we went wrong," just as a way to give a window to their thinking?
 

joe dokes

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I’ve been thinking about respectfully poking Law on Twitter.
Its also not like he was the only one. Maybe its as simple as "they don't throw that hard in Japan so we had no idea he could hit those and just assumed he'd have trouble."
 

wade boggs chicken dinner

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Wait a second, Boggs lives in Tampa? Do you think it’s too creepy to show up at his front door wearing his jersey, asking if he wants to hang out or have a catch? Asking for a friend…
I'm sure if you showed up with some chicken and a case of beer he'd be up for almost anything.


Err, I mean your friend.
 

nighthob

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Wait a second, Boggs lives in Tampa? Do you think it’s too creepy to show up at his front door wearing his jersey, asking if he wants to hang out or have a catch? Asking for a friend…
Not in the least. He really likes it when you show up wearing one of these too.

Creepy-Clown-Mask.jpg
 

simplicio

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I don't read too much of the popular prognosticators. Do they ever go back and say "missed that one. Here's where we went wrong," just as a way to give a window to their thinking?
I think Law is pretty upfront about guys he missed on, not sure if others are.
 

Fishercat

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Spelunker

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Yeah, I'm willing to give Keith Law a pass on this one. On the other hand, I'm gonna spike the football on the unnamed executive quoted here from page 4 of the thread:
https://twitter.com/BeyondtheMnstr
Beyond the Monster
@BeyondtheMnstr
ESPN's Kiley McDaniel on new Red Sox outfielder Masataka Yoshida:
According to "10 sources" he spoke to they all "thought the Red Sox overpaid by a hefty margin." One executive went as far as to say, "We thought he was worth less than half of what they paid."


I mean, if that's their internal evaluation, fine. But there was no reason to put that out there other than to take a cheap shot at Bloom and the Sox. And I feel sorry for the fans of the team that executive works for, since that person is really bad at evaluating talent.
 
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Sin Duda

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Yeah, I'm willing to give Keith Law a pass on this one. On the other hand, I'm gonna spike the football on the unnamed executive quoted here from page 4 of the thread:

https://twitter.com/BeyondtheMnstr
Beyond the Monster
@BeyondtheMnstr
ESPN's Kiley McDaniel on new Red Sox outfielder Masataka Yoshida:
According to "10 sources" he spoke to they all "thought the Red Sox overpaid by a hefty margin." One executive went as far as to say, "We thought he was worth less than half of what they paid."


I mean, if that's their internal evaluation, fine. But there was no reason to put that out there other than to take a cheat shot at Bloom and the Sox. And I feel sorry for the fans of the team that executive works for, since that person is really bad at evaluating talent.
Just means one less team in on Yamamoto.
 

Harry Hooper

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I mean, if that's their internal evaluation, fine. But there was no reason to put that out there other than to take a cheat shot at Bloom and the Sox. And I feel sorry for the fans of the team that executive works for, since that person is really bad at evaluating talent.

Maybe it's more of a comment resulting from frustration that the bidding went way above what this exec's ownership was willing to allow.
 
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johnlos

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Yeah, he's literally one of the best at mea culpas. I'm sure it gets annoying for him when folks continue to chirp at him for wrong projections that he's already owned: I bet some asshole is still tweeting "you didn't believe in pedroyah" as we speak.
I dunno why you gotta call me out like that
 

Rovin Romine

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Yeah, he's literally one of the best at mea culpas. I'm sure it gets annoying for him when folks continue to chirp at him for wrong projections that he's already owned: I bet some asshole is still tweeting "you didn't believe in pedroyah" as we speak.
Mea culpas behind paywalls are the best.
 

Jimbodandy

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Had 4 straight seasons with over 100 walks and 5 additional seasons with over 85 walks.

Makes Ted Williams even more impressive. He walked even more than Boggs and had all those multi-hit games in a row.
Lots of good data points with Williams. Still unfathomable that the guy ended up with a career OBP of .482, especially since he lost prime career years to the military.
 

DJnVa

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Yeah, I'm willing to give Keith Law a pass on this one. On the other hand, I'm gonna spike the football on the unnamed executive quoted here from page 4 of the thread:

https://twitter.com/BeyondtheMnstr
Beyond the Monster
@BeyondtheMnstr
ESPN's Kiley McDaniel on new Red Sox outfielder Masataka Yoshida:
According to "10 sources" he spoke to they all "thought the Red Sox overpaid by a hefty margin." One executive went as far as to say, "We thought he was worth less than half of what they paid."


I mean, if that's their internal evaluation, fine. But there was no reason to put that out there other than to take a cheap shot at Bloom and the Sox. And I feel sorry for the fans of the team that executive works for, since that person is really bad at evaluating talent.

View: https://twitter.com/Jared_Carrabis/status/1680662437022892032
 

Smiling Joe Hesketh

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Yoshida might be as good an example as any at valuing the skill of making contact. He's almost a throwback player in that regard, after years of seeing three true outcomes become the norm in MLB.
 

chawson

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This weekend couldn't help but invoke the comparison.

MLB careers as of 7/16/23
Seiya Suzuki: 757 PA, 109 wRC+, .159 ISO | -3 OAA in 1507 innings | 5/$85M
Masataka Yoshida: 349 PA, 140 wRC+, .184 ISO | -4 OAA in 432 innings* | 5/$90M
*Defensive metrics tend to punish those in Fenway's left field

As someone who was mildly disappointed we didn't sign Suzuki, this is delightful.
 

Sin Duda

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[/QUOTE]
This weekend couldn't help but invoke the comparison.

MLB careers as of 7/16/23
Seiya Suzuki: 757 PA, 109 wRC+, .159 ISO | -3 OAA in 1507 innings | 5/$85M
Masataka Yoshida: 349 PA, 140 wRC+, .184 ISO | -4 OAA in 432 innings* | 5/$90M
*Defensive metrics tend to punish those in Fenway's left field

As someone who was mildly disappointed we didn't sign Suzuki, this is delightful.
Thank you for that. I too was mildly disappointed. But we would have wasted the first year of Suzuki (unless he could have pulled a Ohtani and pitched in July/Aug of 2022). We're still in the playoff picture with Masa, and hopefully so for the entire contract.
 

PhabPhour20

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Yoshida might be as good an example as any at valuing the skill of making contact. He's almost a throwback player in that regard, after years of seeing three true outcomes become the norm in MLB.
I wonder if it is less of him being a "throwback player" and more of him being a person who could be more successful with the rule changes. This is all speculation as I am not a deep data type baseball fan, but perhaps contact has become more valuable again with the defenses being less able to enact perfect positioning. Having watched nearly every game this season, that isn't apparent to me as he seems pretty good at poking the ball OVER the infielders, but again, just anecdote.

Did the increase in shifting correlate to the increase in three true outcome players? Or was it just more that baseball Ops teams around the league realized that being able to remove the defense from the equation altogether was an advantage (and more easily tracked, data-wise)?

As an aside, I am as excited about major league baseball as I have ever been with the rule changes. I was fine with the pace of play in the past, but the reduced shifting and larger bases (and fewer disengagements) has led to more exciting baseball. Would Jarren Duran have so many hustle doubles without the larger bases and three infielders on the right side? The increase in stolen bases is also very fun.
 

koufax32

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Ladies & gentlemen, your current AL batting average leader as of close of business on July 18th
 

Sin Duda

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I hate to break this to you, but Cory Seager is lurking in the shadows with a .348 batting average and will cross the threshold for minimum plate appearances if he plays approximately 55 of Texas' remaining 66 games and gets 4 PAs per game. I think it's his to lose unless Masa keeps on his multi-hit game bender for another 20 games or so.
 

koufax32

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I hate to break this to you, but Cory Seager is lurking in the shadows with a .348 batting average and will cross the threshold for minimum plate appearances if he plays approximately 55 of Texas' remaining 66 games and gets 4 PAs per game. I think it's his to lose unless Masa keeps on his multi-hit game bender for another 20 games or so.
67674
 

koufax32

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For the record, I have not left Florida and I am way too poor to hire a hit man.

Looks like the dream is still alive, albeit for unfortunate reasons.
 

Sin Duda

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For the record, I have not left Florida and I am way too poor to hire a hit man.

Looks like the dream is still alive, albeit for unfortunate reasons.
"Good" news I guess (at least for Masa's pursuit of a batting title), Seager is out at least 10 days with an injured thumb. He might not get enough PAs to qualify, though the believe the rule was changed a few years ago that a player can "add" outs to his PA total to qualify, and if he still leads, he wins.
 

GrandSlamPozo

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"Good" news I guess (at least for Masa's pursuit of a batting title), Seager is out at least 10 days with an injured thumb. He might not get enough PAs to qualify, though the believe the rule was changed a few years ago that a player can "add" outs to his PA total to qualify, and if he still leads, he wins.
That rule has been around since at least 1996 when it allowed Tony Gwynn to win the batting title (he was 4 PAs short of qualifying).

According to this article the rule has been around since the 50s.
 
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Van Everyman

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"Good" news I guess (at least for Masa's pursuit of a batting title), Seager is out at least 10 days with an injured thumb. He might not get enough PAs to qualify, though the believe the rule was changed a few years ago that a player can "add" outs to his PA total to qualify, and if he still leads, he wins.
WTF is that rule? You can say you came up and got out more times than you actually did?!?
 

Red(s)HawksFan

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WTF is that rule? You can say you came up and got out more times than you actually did?!?
I believe the idea is that if a player is short of the minimum PA to qualify, they can still be declared the league leader in batting average if every AB they need to make the minimum is counted as an out and the resulting BA is still the highest in the league.

Let's say Seager is hitting .348 in 480 at bats and he needs 502 to qualify. Same number of hits (167) in 502 AB = .332. If that's still good enough to lead the league, he's considered the league leader.
 

Spelunker

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WTF is that rule? You can say you came up and got out more times than you actually did?!?
If you're short the number of plate appearances to qualify for the batting title, but you're so far ahead that adding in enough outs to get you there still leaves you with a higher average, it's yours.

I think that entirely makes sense.
 

E5 Yaz

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WTF is that rule? You can say you came up and got out more times than you actually did?!?
Yes.

Looking into this just now, Melky Cabrera wound up with 501 plate appearances in 2012 and would have won the NL batting title, but he declined doing so because he admitted to substance use that gave him an advantage that season.
 

Van Everyman

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Yes.

Looking into this just now, Melky Cabrera wound up with 501 plate appearances in 2012 and would have won the NL batting title, but he declined doing so because he admitted to substance use that gave him an advantage that season.
I was going to say, based on the previous two responses, that I guess that made sense. But then your post added in that it's at the player's discretion which, outside of the somewhat unique situation you just described, seems a completely odd thing to include.
 

GrandSlamPozo

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If the 0-for rule had been in place in 1955 then Ted Williams would have won the AL OBP title despite finishing 60(!!) plate appearances short of qualifying. He finished with a .496 OBP in 417 PAs and you needed 477 PAs to qualify since the season was still only 154 games. If you added 60 hitless ABs to his season line his OBP would've been .434 which is still higher than Mickey Mantle's .431 which led the league that year.
 

joe dokes

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If the 0-for rule had been in place in 1955 then Ted Williams would have won the AL OBP title despite finishing 60(!!) plate appearances short of qualifying. He finished with a .496 OBP in 417 PAs and you needed 477 PAs to qualify since the season was still only 154 games. If you added 60 hitless ABs to his season line his OBP would've been .434 which is still higher than Mickey Mantle's .431 which led the league that year.
I think the difference is that there's no official OBP title, as there is for BA. Baseball Reference (and the Encyclopedia before that) has their "black ink" entries for league leaders, but they may not follow the same conventions as MLB for that stuff.
 

GrandSlamPozo

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I think the difference is that there's no official OBP title, as there is for BA. Baseball Reference (and the Encyclopedia before that) has their "black ink" entries for league leaders, but they may not follow the same conventions as MLB for that stuff.
It applies to batting average, slugging and on base percentage according to the MLB rulebook.

9.22 Minimum Standards for Individual Championships
To assure uniformity in establishing the batting, pitching and
fielding championships of professional leagues, such champions
shall meet the following minimum performance standards:
(a) The individual batting, slugging or on-base percentage
champion shall be the player with the highest batting average,
slugging percentage or on-base percentage, as the case may
be, provided the player is credited with as many or more total
appearances at the plate in league championship games as the
number of games scheduled for each Club in his Club’s league
that season, multiplied by 3.1 in the case of a Major League
player and by 2.7 in the case of a Minor League player. Total
appearances at the plate shall include official times at bat, plus
bases on balls, times hit by pitcher, sacrifice hits, sacrifice
flies and times awarded first base because of interference or
obstruction. Notwithstanding the foregoing requirement of
minimum appearances at the plate, any player with fewer than
the required number of plate appearances whose average would
be the highest, if he were charged with the required number of
plate appearances shall be awarded the batting, slugging or on-
base percentage championship, as the case may be.
 

joe dokes

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It applies to batting average, slugging and on base percentage according to the MLB rulebook.

9.22 Minimum Standards for Individual Championships
To assure uniformity in establishing the batting, pitching and
fielding championships of professional leagues, such champions
shall meet the following minimum performance standards:
(a) The individual batting, slugging or on-base percentage
champion shall be the player with the highest batting average,
slugging percentage or on-base percentage, as the case may
be, provided the player is credited with as many or more total
appearances at the plate in league championship games as the
number of games scheduled for each Club in his Club’s league
that season, multiplied by 3.1 in the case of a Major League
player and by 2.7 in the case of a Minor League player. Total
appearances at the plate shall include official times at bat, plus
bases on balls, times hit by pitcher, sacrifice hits, sacrifice
flies and times awarded first base because of interference or
obstruction. Notwithstanding the foregoing requirement of
minimum appearances at the plate, any player with fewer than
the required number of plate appearances whose average would
be the highest, if he were charged with the required number of
plate appearances shall be awarded the batting, slugging or on-
base percentage championship, as the case may be.
I was not aware of that. However, the internet says that the rule did not have that form in 1955. (I havent done the math.....)

Baseball-Reference FAQs | Sports-Reference.com
What are the minimum requirements to lead a Rate Stat?
This is a bit of a dicey proposition as the standards have changed quite a bit throughout time. Here are how I computed them for the website. Thanks to Bill Deane, Gerry Myerson and Total Baseball for clarifying some of these issues.

Batting Average, OBP, Slugging Percentage, OPS

  • Prior to 1920, a player must have appeared in 60% of the team's games to qualify for a title.
  • From 1920-1944, a player must have appeared in 100 games, unless it is the 1938 AL. That year Jimmie Foxx (.349 in 149 games) was awarded the batting title over Taffy Wright (.350 in 100 games) for that season I used 101 games as the cutoff. Fair? Probably not.
  • From 1945-1956, a player must have 2.6 at bats per team game. Note however, that from 1951-1954 a player could lead if they still led after the necessary number of hitless at bats were added to their at bat total.
  • From 1957 to the present, a player must have 3.1 plate appearances per team game. Note however, that from 1967 to the present a player could lead if they still led after the necessary number of hitless plate appearances were added to their at bat total.
  • From 2012 to the present, the Melky Cabrera rule was put in effect. No player suspended for a violation of the MLB drug policy may add hitless AB's to their totals to reach the minimum required PA's. Since this is only applied to drug suspended players, we are likewise following this policy. At the time there was some confusion on our part and elsewhere as to how this was going to be applied, but I'm satisfied with MLB's decision since it does exclude players like Joey Votto who won the OBP title in 2012 with fewer than 502 PA's.
 

Sin Duda

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Very fun, but if I'm the Sox brass, keeping in mind what happened to David Hamilton, that video scares me to death. At least wear some batting gloves!