MLB Investigating a PED Pipeline in Florida

terrynever

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Average Reds said:
The media's job is to report, not to prosecute or to assist in any sort of enforcement. I don't think there is any question that Bosch's notebook will contain information that will be damaging to a lot of people, and once you turn over the notebook, you lose control over that information. This would have a devastating impact on this organization's ability to perform any sort of investigative journalism in the future.
 
None of this even touches on the fact that MLB is a private organization and has no ability to compel production of sources or documents. Since it's not in their interests to cooperate with MLB, I can't for the life of me understand why the New Times wouldn't just tell MLB to take a hike.
 
There may be factors that I am unaware of that would change things, but the only way I could see the notebook being turned over is if the source asks the New Times to do so. 
Excellent analysis. Your point about the impact is very important. A newspaper that gives over information, or sources, to anyone who asks loses all credibility in ongoing investigations.
 
The New Times has gained a lot of respect for its investigation of Bosch. It could lose it in a hurry by giving in to MLB. And since the people who run New Times are respected newsmen, that's just not going to happen.
 
As you say, MLB isn't the government and can't take New Times to court. The FBI could. It is lurking around the corners of this scandal. But after failing in court with Clemens and Bonds, it may not want to pursue A-Rod to the max.
 
I could see A-Rod breaking down like James Cagney in White Heat. Top of the world, mom!
 

soxhop411

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BREAKING: Ryan Braun's name is in Biogenesis records and MLB will investigate his association with PED clinic. News: http://yhoo.it/VSa8bF
 
 
 
Jeff Passan ‏@JeffPassan
Names in records obtained by Yahoo! Sports also include Yankees catcher Francisco Cervelli and Orioles third baseman Danny Valencia.
 
I think we are going to begin to hear more high profile names.... Hopefully the Red Sox come out clean.
 

CoolPapaBellhorn

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Jerrygarciaparra said:
So, clearly MLB's steroid testing is ineffective to say the least.
Well, they did catch Melky Cabrera, Yasmani Grandal, and Ryan Braun* before this Miami clinic came to light. MLB's testing plan is surely lagging behind, but I don't think it's completely ineffective.
 

Jerrygarciaparra

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You make a good point.  I guess I'm just surprised how many different drugs and how often he was doing them.  It seems like he wasn't especially concerned about failing  a test.
 

SoxScout

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Brewers outfielder Ryan Braun just released this statement:
“During the course of preparing for my successful appeal last year, my attorneys, who were previously familiar with Tony Bosch, used him as a consultant. More specifically, he answered questions about T/E ratio and possibilities of tampering with samples.
“There was a dispute over compensation for Bosch’s work, which is why my lawyer and I are listed under ‘moneys owed’ and not on any other list.
“I have nothing to hide and have never had any other relationship with Bosch.
“I will fully cooperate with any inquiry into this matter.”
 

DieHardSoxFan1

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Not everyone tests for elevated testosterone. For the leagues or sports that do, they must account for people with naturally elevated levels of testosterone. That threshold is higher than you think because they're accounting for biological outliers — some athletes might naturally have twice as much testosterone as the average person. All right, so let's say you're an NFL player that has to test three times higher than the "average" threshold before getting flagged. Conceivably, you could rely on a controlled amount of HGH, something that bumps you up … just not TOO high. Maybe you jack up your testosterone levels a little under three times higher than they should be. Guess what? That's still legal! Do they have patches that can briefly bump up your levels without prolonged traces? Yes, they do! Did one famous athlete (not an NFL player) use that patch on his testicles to bump his levels close to that threshold, fall asleep, keep his patch on too long and subsequently fail his next test? Yes, he did! It's amazing this doesn't happen more often.
 
http://www.grantland.com/story/_/id/8904906/daring-ask-ped-question
 
From Simmons' great column on asking the Roid question. 
 
I have it on pretty good authority that the famous athlete was Braun. 
 

MakMan44

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I hope these are the last of the names we hear but I seriously doubt that
 

Jordu

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terrynever said:
MLB investigators in Miami, reviewing the documents alleged to have come from Bosch's lab, and hope to obtain them from the New Times.
Did Bosch give the paper the originals and not photocopies of the documents? Has that been reported? Nobody gives their only copy of a document to a reporter.
 

Bob420

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This should read:
 

Brewers outfielder Ryan Braun just released this statement:

“During the course of preparing for my successful appeal last year,
my attorneys, who were previously familiar with Tony Bosch, used him as a
consultant. More specifically, he answered questions about T/E ratio
and how to avoid testing positive while taking PED's in the future.

“There was a dispute over compensation for Bosch’s work, which is why my
lawyer and I are listed under ‘moneys owed’ and not on any other list.
“I have nothing to hide and have never had any other relationship with Bosch.

“I will fully cooperate with any inquiry into this matter.”
 

terrynever

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Jordu said:
Did Bosch give the paper the originals and not photocopies of the documents? Has that been reported? Nobody gives their only copy of a document to a reporter.
It was an alleged unhappy staffer who copied the documents and then got them to the New Times.
 

Jordu

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terrynever said:
Did Bosch give the paper the originals and not photocopies of the documents? Has that been reported? Nobody gives their only copy of a document to a reporter.
It was an alleged unhappy staffer who copied the documents and then got them to the New Times.
Which means Bosch still has the documents and could give them to MLB. If he wants to.
 

Gash Prex

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So according to A-Rod this is all a massive forgery and conspiracy but only on him because so far the lists appear to be genuine with respect to the other Names. Even Braun came up with a story as to why his name is on the list.

Edit: and so did Cervelli
 

Sampo Gida

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Gash Prex said:
So according to A-Rod this is all a massive forgery and conspiracy but only on him because so far the lists appear to be genuine with respect to the other Names. Even Braun came up with a story as to why his name is on the list.

Edit: and so did Cervelli
 
If an unhappy staffer wanted to fabricate these notebook for sale to a tabloid and wanted them to appear authentic or genuine, he would certainly use the names of recently known steroid users or suspected users, and a few others who have not been linked.
 

Sampo Gida

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According to the Yahoo! Sports report, Braun's name also appeared
directly above a line that reads, "RB 20-30K." Bosch listed amounts of
money owed next to the names of other players, according to the report.
But
Braun asserted in his statement the "moneys owed" to Bosch were merely
compensation for his consultation during the appeal process.
 
http://espn.go.com/mlb/story/_/id/8919375/ryan-braun-admits-consulting-anthony-bosch-appeal-positive-ped-test
 
You would think Bosch would have a single number in mind to charge and not a range.
 
IIRCC, Arod owed 4K, and Melky 9K.
 

StuckOnYouk

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Whatever you do Alex, please don't retire anytime soon. Do what you can to make it back. Make these Steinbrenner pigs pay out every single penny.
 
I've never been so sympathetic to this douche in my life.
 

In my lifetime

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DieHardSoxFan1 said:
http://www.grantland.com/story/_/id/8904906/daring-ask-ped-question
 
From Simmons' great column on asking the Roid question. 
 
I have it on pretty good authority that the famous athlete was Braun. 
 
The likely next shoe to drop is that the "more famous MLB" players are using (insert -- paying off) their minor league brethren (minor leaguers get tested more often than major leaguers) as guinea pigs for finding out what PED regimens get flagged by the league and which escape detection. 
 

Van Everyman

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terrynever said:
MLB investigators in Miami, reviewing the documents alleged to have come from Bosch's lab, and hope to obtain them from the New Times. This raises an interesting ethical question for the New Times' editors. If they give them the documents, they are caving in to investigators, and setting a bad precedent for their organization, and the media in general. Standard rule is media protects sources and documentation of stories from outside agencies. New Times' now "deliberating," to use the editor's word, over this request from MLB.

http://espn.go.com/mlb/story/_/id/8916793/reports-mlb-seeking-records-newspaper-link-peds-alex-rodriguez

New York Daily News is probably the best source for A-Rod coverage as this sorry spectacle unravels. The link above from brs3 is a day ahead of everyone else covering this story.
The irony that the media could be the ones who save his career and reputation is rather rich.

With Montero and Melky involved, you have to wonder if we're entering 1990-era Texas Rangers territory with a sizable portion of the team dipping from the same well.

Whoever said upthread the Yankees should be worried about Cano's name coming into this is OTM.

Edit: And ARod obviously.
 

SemperFidelisSox

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But in this case that well seems to be agents Sam and Seth Levinson. They represent Melky, Montero, Gio Gonzalez, Nelson Cruz, and were linked to Bosch.

Another common thread linking most of these players together (besides Bosch) is U of Miami. Surprise, surprise.
 
Nov 29, 2012
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I think it's obvious that the Big News here, and I'm surprised that no one picked up on it... Is that A-rod's nickname in the Yankees clubhouse was "Bitch Tits."
 
 
 
Scandalous
 

SoxLegacy

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Verducci had a column up yesterday with info regarding the link to the U of Miami and the players. Pretty much skewers Braun as well for his "Uh, we owe Bosch money for consulting fees" defense. http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/mlb/news/20130205/ryan-braun-ped-scandal-anthony-bosch/?sct=hp_wr_a2&eref=sihp Notes also that Valencia played for the U of M, and the university's trainer, Jimmy Goins, turned up in the paperwork obtained by the New Times. Also Detroit Tiger Cesar Carrillo is in the notes as well.
 

InsideTheParker

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Hugh G Rection said:
I think it's obvious that the Big News here, and I'm surprised that no one picked up on it... Is that A-rod's nickname in the Yankees clubhouse was "Bitch Tits."
 
 
 
Scandalous
That's b/c it's not news. I heard it around the time of Selena Roberts' book. Don't know if it was in there, but I first heard it around that time. I think I remember reading Posada called him that.
 

JimD

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How is it that MLB gets one black eye after another with these stories, yet no one can find similar evidence implicating NFL players or a major college powerhouse?  It seems incredible to think that football isn't rife with PED abuse at all levels.
 

RingoOSU

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Because baseball fans care about the sanctity of numbers like home runs in a season or career, and football fans only care about making the other guy hurt by any means necessary.
 

SoxLegacy

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JimD, I believe that the NFL is full of PED's. Just look at the Ray Lewis recovery--37 year old guy tears his triceps and is ready to go play in 11 weeks! What powers of recovery he must have! Honestly, I think Ringo is right---I think most people look the other way when it comes to suspicions of PED's and the NFL.
 

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In my lifetime said:
The likely next shoe to drop is that the "more famous MLB" players are using (insert -- paying off) their minor league brethren (minor leaguers get tested more often than major leaguers) as guinea pigs for finding out what PED regimens get flagged by the league and which escape detection. 
 
Why would you run that risk (and potentially ruin someone else's career) when you can just test yourself?  Aren't testing procedures and thresholds transparent to the union?  Even without self testing, there are copious amounts of information about PED use on the Internet, and these guys are paying consultants to give them the best advice on how to use and beat the system.
 
Is there random off-season testing?  If not, players would just use then.  Cycle and bulk up in the offseason, maintain in-season.
 

Sampo Gida

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RingoOSU said:
Because baseball fans care about the sanctity of numbers like home runs in a season or career, and football fans only care about making the other guy hurt by any means necessary.
 
So how do baseball fans rationalize numbers put up in the pre-integration era where some of the best players were not allowed to play.  Imagine a league today with no African Americans or black Latinos.  It would be AAAA ball.
 
How about moving the mound back and lowering it.  Maple bats, juiced balls, smaller parks, bigger and stronger athletes, changing strike zones, bigger gloves, better lighting.
 
Players being able to train in the offseason instead of working as an insurance salesman because salaries were too low.
 
Flying chartered planes and staying in 5 star hotels instead of taking the bus or train and staying in flop houses.
 
Ampehatmines (until recently), Red Bull, Creatine, TJ surgery, cortisone injections, personal trainers, video, etc.
 
You call it sanctity I call it sanctimony.
 

Average Reds

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Sampo Gida said:
So how do baseball fans rationalize numbers put up in the pre-integration era where some of the best players were not allowed to play.  Imagine a league today with no African Americans or black Latinos.  It would be AAAA ball.
 
How about moving the mound back and lowering it.  Maple bats, juiced balls, smaller parks, bigger and stronger athletes, changing strike zones, bigger gloves, better lighting.
 
Players being able to train in the offseason instead of working as an insurance salesman because salaries were too low.
 
Flying chartered planes and staying in 5 star hotels instead of taking the bus or train and staying in flop houses.
 
Ampehatmines (until recently), Red Bull, Creatine, TJ surgery, cortisone injections, personal trainers, video, etc.
 
You call it sanctity I call it sanctimony.
 
 
We've had this discussion so many times that I suspect you will not be moved by it, but I'll address this.
 
To begin with, your essential point is not only fair, it is unassailable:  MLB, the BBWAA and the fans are giant hypocrites on this issue.  Specifically, even if we remove PEDs from the equation, changes in the game over the years have rendered any historical connection to the past moot.  And even if we were able to isolate PEDs, they have been a part of the game (in one form or another) for a very long time, and everyone from the commissioner on down to the casual fan basically ignored it because we didn't want to know.
 
What made (or makes) steroids different is their effectiveness.  Steroids were such an effective PED that they made a mockery of our collective ability to ignore them.  To put it in simpler terms, greenies helped players stay alert and perform to the full extent of their capabilities; steroids radically changed their appearance and allowed players to alter - sometimes dramatically - the definition of those capabilities. 
 
I believe that the reason fans get upset about steroids in baseball and not in football is partly due to the (false) notion that there is something sacred about the records in baseball.  But IMO, the biggest reason we treat baseball players differently than we treat football players is the most obvious one:  because they don't wear padding or any equipment to obscure how they look, we see the physical effects of steroids on baseball players.  We don't see this on football players because the padding and helmets render them anonymous.  And to me, that anonymity is the key to our ability to turn a blind eye to the problem.
 

glennhoffmania

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Sampo Gida said:
So how do baseball fans rationalize numbers put up in the pre-integration era where some of the best players were not allowed to play.  Imagine a league today with no African Americans or black Latinos.  It would be AAAA ball.
 
How about moving the mound back and lowering it.  Maple bats, juiced balls, smaller parks, bigger and stronger athletes, changing strike zones, bigger gloves, better lighting.
 
Players being able to train in the offseason instead of working as an insurance salesman because salaries were too low.
 
Flying chartered planes and staying in 5 star hotels instead of taking the bus or train and staying in flop houses.
 
Ampehatmines (until recently), Red Bull, Creatine, TJ surgery, cortisone injections, personal trainers, video, etc.
 
You call it sanctity I call it sanctimony.
 
Here's my take.  Segregation, using different bats/balls, new parks, bigger gloves and better lighting were all legal, not against the MLB rules, and transparent to anyone who followed the game.  Taking PEDs is illegal, against the MLB rules, and done in total secrecy.  If/when PEDs become available over the counter, are allowed under the MLB rules, and are taken out in the open, people wouldn't care as much.
 

johnmd20

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glennhoffmania said:
Here's my take.  Segregation, using different bats/balls, new parks, bigger gloves and better lighting were all legal, not against the MLB rules, and transparent to anyone who followed the game.  Taking PEDs is illegal, against the MLB rules, and done in total secrecy.  If/when PEDs become available over the counter, are allowed under the MLB rules, and are taken out in the open, people wouldn't care as much.
 
Andro wasn't illegal in the 90's when McGwire was using it. Greenies weren't legal in the 60's and 70's. There has been secrecy in taking performance enhancers for decades. But Average is right, roids worked TOO well. You don't notice it in football b/c everyone is faster and stronger, and, thus, individual players don't improve that much relative to their peers.
 
But in baseball it's one on one. So the best of the best dominate the game in a way that has never happened before. But it is all sanctimony and BS in my opinion. There is nothing clean in sports. When contracts are in the 9 figures, the most competitive people in the world will try to find an edge.
 

glennhoffmania

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johnmd20 said:
Andro wasn't illegal in the 90's when McGwire was using it. Greenies weren't legal in the 60's and 70's. There has been secrecy in taking performance enhancers for decades. But Average is right, roids worked TOO well. You don't notice it in football b/c everyone is faster and stronger, and, thus, individual players don't improve that much relative to their peers.
 
But in baseball it's one on one. So the best of the best dominate the game in a way that has never happened before. But it is all sanctimony and BS in my opinion. There is nothing clean in sports. When contracts are in the 9 figures, the most competitive people in the world will try to find an edge.
 
And HGH and testosterone are legal now.  But only with a prescription, which requires that you have a medical reason for it.  I'm assuming that ARod doesn't have a health issue that required him to get prescriptions from doctors for HGH and the other crap he took.
 
If you're talking about violating the MLB rules as opposed to legal vs. illegal, that's another story.  But it doesn't change the fact that they were still taken illegally and with no transparency.
 

johnmd20

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glennhoffmania said:
And HGH and testosterone are legal now.  But only with a prescription, which requires that you have a medical reason for it.  I'm assuming that ARod doesn't have a health issue that required him to get prescriptions from doctors for HGH and the other crap he took.
 
If you're talking about violating the MLB rules as opposed to legal vs. illegal, that's another story.  But it doesn't change the fact that they were still taken illegally and with no transparency.
 
I imagine Arod could work it out with a Doctor to have a reason to take HGH.(recovering from two hip surgeries, for instance)
 
But, yes, there is no transparency and there never will be and athletes will continue to take drugs that allow them to get stronger and recover quicker. I am not sure what that drug is, but I imagine the guy gunning for a 125 million dollar contract knows what that drug is or is trying to find out. And there is a scientist who came up with that formula so he can sell him that drug for a tidy profit.
 
Follow the money.
 

Sampo Gida

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glennhoffmania said:
Here's my take.  Segregation, using different bats/balls, new parks, bigger gloves and better lighting were all legal, not against the MLB rules, and transparent to anyone who followed the game.  Taking PEDs is illegal, against the MLB rules, and done in total secrecy.  If/when PEDs become available over the counter, are allowed under the MLB rules, and are taken out in the open, people wouldn't care as much.
 
That's the "moral" argument", my comment was concerning the "sanctity of numbers" argument.
 
Players have been doing amphetamines and cocaine since the 60's, some openly so.   Illegal yet somehow not a "sanctity of numbers" issue even though many players will swear amphetamines helped their performance over a long season.    Raines used to keep cocaine in his pocket during games.
 
Some players drank during the prohibition when it was illegal. As we know from Kevin Millar in 2004, booze can help you win. :lol:
 
Before testing, steroids use was rampant with no penalties.  How widespread it was we can only guess, some estimates are 50% or more.   MLB and team owners sanctioned their use.  Merloni told of the Red Sox medical staff showing players how to use safely.  MLB put on presentations for owners touting the benefits of steroid use.  To blame any player for using in this environment seems foolish to me.
 
The outrage against players who use and get busted in the steroid testing era is justified, not for the "sanctity of numbers", because it really is cheating now (assuming the testing program is effective and usage is way down, which I have my doubts about) . 
 

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SemperFidelisSox said:
But in this case that well seems to be agents Sam and Seth Levinson. They represent Melky, Montero, Gio Gonzalez, Nelson Cruz, and were linked to Bosch.
Another common thread linking most of these players together (besides Bosch) is U of Miami. Surprise, surprise.
Thou doth protesteth too much?

Boras opening a gym in South Florida to "protect" his players from PEDdlers:

http://msn.foxsports.com/mlb/story/scott-boras-open-private-fitness-center-for-clients-in-south-florida-peds-020713
 

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Update on Biogenesis:
 
ESPN.com's T.J. Quinn and Mike Fish, citing documents procured by Outside the Lines, add five names to the list of ballplayers linked to Anthony Bosch's controversial Biogenesis clinic.
 
Those names are Padres shortstop Everth Cabrera , Astros outfielder Fernando Martinez, A's reliever Jordan Norberto, Padres reliever Fautino De Los Santos and Mets prospect Cesar Puello. Here's the heart of the matter regarding these five players:

 
 Sources said the players, like those who have been named in previous Biogenesis documents, were on a list as having received performance-enhancing drugs, although the documents are not proof that the players either received or used PEDs. 
 
 
 According to two sources familiar with Bosch's operation, however, the Washington Nationals' Gio Gonzalez, previously identified as being named in Biogenesis documents, did not receive banned substances from Bosch or the clinic.
 

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soxhop411

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At least 90 #MLB & MiLB plyrs in Biogenesis clinic records.
 
 
 
http://www.usatoday.com/story/sports/mlb/2013/03/19/ryan-braun-remains-calm-amid-drug-firestorm/2001581/
 
 


There are at least 90 baseball players, including Braun, whose names appear in the infamous Biogenesis Clinic records, according to one baseball official with direct knowledge of the investigation. The person spoke to USA TODAY Sports on the condition of anonymity because he is not authorized to discuss the matter because of privacy issues.





 
In some cases, according to two officials who spoke to USA TODAY Sports but were unauthorized to speak publicly, some players will be granted immunity even if they admit guilt to the use of performance-enhancing drugs. They would have to fully disclose their arrangement with Tony Bosch, former director of the now-shuttered Biogenesis clinic, including any possible involvement by their agents or knowledge of other players who received performance-enhancing drugs from him.
 

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soxhop411 said:
At least 90 #MLB & MiLB plyrs in Biogenesis clinic records.
 
 
 
http://www.usatoday.com/story/sports/mlb/2013/03/19/ryan-braun-remains-calm-amid-drug-firestorm/2001581/
 
 


There are at least 90 baseball players, including Braun, whose names appear in the infamous Biogenesis Clinic records, according to one baseball official with direct knowledge of the investigation. The person spoke to USA TODAY Sports on the condition of anonymity because he is not authorized to discuss the matter because of privacy issues.





 
In some cases, according to two officials who spoke to USA TODAY Sports but were unauthorized to speak publicly, some players will be granted immunity even if they admit guilt to the use of performance-enhancing drugs. They would have to fully disclose their arrangement with Tony Bosch, former director of the now-shuttered Biogenesis clinic, including any possible involvement by their agents or knowledge of other players who received performance-enhancing drugs from him.
Offering immunity to marginal players on this list can really net some big fish.  Say I'm a guy like Eduardo Nunez and MLB tells me I'm looking at a 50 game suspension for being on this list.  There's a very high probability that punishment will be a career ender for me.  I would probably be apt to tell them everything I knew, even if I was implicating other players.
 

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YouLookAdopted said:
Offering immunity to marginal players on this list can really net some big fish.  Say I'm a guy like Eduardo Nunez and MLB tells me I'm looking at a 50 game suspension for being on this list.  There's a very high probability that punishment will be a career ender for me.  I would probably be apt to tell them everything I knew, even if I was implicating other players.
 
If that story is accurate, MLB investigators have adopted a counter-productive strategy to fight PEDs.  It's the kind of thing that will set off a civil war on several fronts and has the potential to damage the brand far more than the problem they are fighting. If anyone doubts it, they should ask themselves how much interest they have in professional cycling these days.
 
I'll admit that I don't know the answer here. But using the limited investigative powers of MLB to force the weakest players to flip on superstars is not the way to go.  That's burning the village in order to save it.
 

soxhop411

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Major League Baseball’s investigation of an anti-aging clinic linked to performance-enhancing drugs has taken a new turn, with the commissioner’s office paying a former employee of the facility for documents related to the case. At the same time, two people briefed on the matter said, at least one player linked to the clinic has purchased documents from a former clinic employee in order to destroy them.

The unusual battle, according to the two people, also appears to involve efforts by other players tied to the clinic to buy potentially incriminating documents and keep them out of the hands of baseball’s investigators.

One of the two people said that, in part, baseball, which has no subpoena power, felt compelled to pay money for documents because its officials had been concerned that more than one player was trying to do the same.

In addition, the two people said, baseball has now provided payments to former employees of the clinic who have cooperated with the sport’s investigators. The payments were for the time they provided to the investigators, the two people said, and, in each instance, were not believed to have exceeded several thousand dollars.

That baseball is paying for evidence underscores just how determined it has become in establishing what went on at a now-closed South Florida clinic that operated under the name Biogenesis of America. The clinic is suspected of providing performance-enhancing drugs to a number of major leaguers.

In January, a weekly newspaper, Miami New Times, reported that it had obtained medical records from the clinic that tied half a dozen players — Alex Rodriguez, Melky Cabrera, Gio Gonzalez, Bartolo Colon, Nelson Cruz and Yasmani Grandal — to the use of banned substances like human growth hormone.
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/04/12/sp...gewanted=print
 

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soxhop411 said:
Jeff Passan ‏@JeffPassan3m
Big news: Looks like MLB did indeed finally get the Biogenesis documents -- by paying for them, the NYT reports. http://nyti.ms/10PDZlW 
 
 
My bet is suspensions will be handed down by end of May
 
 
The way they are handling this demonstrates that MLB may passed the NHL to become the single stupidest organization in professional sports.
 

derekson

Member
SoSH Member
Jun 26, 2010
6,485
So who bought his own evidence and destroyed it? Braun, to weasel off the hook again?
 
Not sure I agree that this makes MLB stupid. It may hurt PR in the short term but at least it shows they care about more than just paying lip service to eliminating dangerous drug (ab)use, unlike the NFL where such stuff is completely unchecked and no one seems to care. Personally PED use doesn't especially bother me, but the sport has decided to police it so they may as well do so via all avenues.