Damar Hamlin is headed home to Buffalo!

snowmanny

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Yup. The owners broke the union in 1987 when tons of players crossed the picket line during their strike.
Particularly Joe Montana, who I believe only skipped one week then torched replacement players for a couple of weeks.
 

Kliq

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I know it's often an unpopular take in that it imposes duty against freedom, but, as per my engagement with @Valek123 above, I would absolutely love to see First Responder training become part of our public education curriculum.

Imagine if everyone everywhere had an understanding of how health crises worked. I don't mean being doctors, but a basic relationship to the biological phenomena that is, well, frickin' life. How to understand it cognitively, and how to respond in crisis, intertwined. Is there really not 20 hours out of the four year curriculum that couldn't be put for... that??
I learned CPR training in high school, we spent like a month where instead of having typical phys ed, we learned CPR. How much I remember of that though....
 

CPT Neuron

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Dec 4, 2001
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"Neurologically Intact" is a vast statement...but, it is a huge statement at this time. Clearing the sedation (which should be relatively quick in a healthy 20-something compared to others) and time will tell us more an more. The prognostic data I reference to guide families defines "Good Recovery" as still with moderate neurologic disability as a floor. If anyone is primed for a stellar recovery, however, he would seem to fit that profile.
 

Jody Reed's 1988 Mustache

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"Neurologically Intact" is a vast statement...but, it is a huge statement at this time. Clearing the sedation (which should be relatively quick in a healthy 20-something compared to others) and time will tell us more an more. The prognostic data I reference to guide families defines "Good Recovery" as still with moderate neurologic disability as a floor. If anyone is primed for a stellar recovery, however, he would seem to fit that profile.
Agreed with all the above but honestly I’m pretty skeptical of the ‘neurologically intact’ statement they made. I mean, he’s still intubated so you can’t assess speech or a number of other factors. I think at this point it means he wakes up when off sedation, can understand others around him, follows simple commands and can move his arms/legs. Still, amazing news but far from ‘intact.’
 

Ale Xander

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Oct 31, 2013
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“Neurological condition and function is intact”

per Dr Timothy Pitts at U of C Health (Division Chief of General Surgery)

PCon CNN
 

ElUno20

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This is blowing my mind. He was gone. Emergency crew on the field, build them a damn statue
 

Jimbodandy

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I know it's often an unpopular take in that it imposes duty against freedom, but, as per my engagement with @Valek123 above, I would absolutely love to see First Responder training become part of our public education curriculum.

Imagine if everyone everywhere had an understanding of how health crises worked. I don't mean being doctors, but a basic relationship to the biological phenomena that is, well, frickin' life. How to understand it cognitively, and how to respond in crisis, intertwined. Is there really not 20 hours out of the four year curriculum that couldn't be put for... that??
Makes loads of sense.

FWIW, when I was a boy scout, one of the requirements for rank promotion (First Class maybe) was the First Aid merit badge. There were a number of requirements, including a certain minimum number of merit badges. The only merit badge called out by name was First Aid. It included CPR, although not quite the Red Cross course. CPR, how to stop the bleeding (pressure, pressure points, tourniquets), heimlich, splints, how to transport injuried folks if you're in the field, etc. I can still stop a radial pulse by applying pressure to the inside of the upper arm between the biceps and triceps. It's a great party trick. But I used the heimlich on mom once too as a 15yo.

I'd like to see more workplaces offer it to employees. My knowledge would still be 40 years old if mine hadn't.
 

BigSoxFan

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This all seems very promising. Can't wait for him to return to a game as a spectator. The place is going to go absolutely nuts.
 

ifmanis5

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Sep 29, 2007
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This all seems very promising. Can't wait for him to return to a game as a spectator. The place is going to go absolutely nuts.
Agreed this is awesome news. I hope the first responders and doctors get a nice hand at some point as well. They did an incredible job it seems.
 

AlNipper49

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Makes loads of sense.

FWIW, when I was a boy scout, one of the requirements for rank promotion (First Class maybe) was the First Aid merit badge. There were a number of requirements, including a certain minimum number of merit badges. The only merit badge called out by name was First Aid. It included CPR, although not quite the Red Cross course. CPR, how to stop the bleeding (pressure, pressure points, tourniquets), heimlich, splints, how to transport injuried folks if you're in the field, etc. I can still stop a radial pulse by applying pressure to the inside of the upper arm between the biceps and triceps. It's a great party trick. But I used the heimlich on mom once too as a 15yo.

I'd like to see more workplaces offer it to employees. My knowledge would still be 40 years old if mine hadn't.
They still do it but the badge is not required for First Class. It’s better in a sense. Every rank up to basically First Class has age-appropriate First Aid training. So even first year scouts are learning things like applying bandages, cleaning wounds properly and proper safety measures. The skill / responsibility levels ramp up. There are strong suggestions that we use Star/Life/Eagles to teach the basics to the kids. Not only does it stick better, but it helps the older ones lock in that knowledge.
 

Dotrat

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This is awesome news!
(And I agree with @Reverend. Every sentient human in the US should know CPR--maybe with local FD's and/or Emergency Squads offering periodic refreshers.)
 

BigSoxFan

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Agreed this is awesome news. I hope the first responders and doctors get a nice hand at some point as well. They did an incredible job it seems.
Yeah, would be great if they all were there together. Will get very dusty, that’s for sure.
 

RIFan

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Jul 19, 2005
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Makes loads of sense.

FWIW, when I was a boy scout, one of the requirements for rank promotion (First Class maybe) was the First Aid merit badge. There were a number of requirements, including a certain minimum number of merit badges. The only merit badge called out by name was First Aid. It included CPR, although not quite the Red Cross course. CPR, how to stop the bleeding (pressure, pressure points, tourniquets), heimlich, splints, how to transport injuried folks if you're in the field, etc. I can still stop a radial pulse by applying pressure to the inside of the upper arm between the biceps and triceps. It's a great party trick. But I used the heimlich on mom once too as a 15yo.

I'd like to see more workplaces offer it to employees. My knowledge would still be 40 years old if mine hadn't.
I still lean back on first aid training I had as a scout. Related to this conversation, my son was on a school trip to Italy during his senior year. They had some unscheduled time so him and two of his friends were out sightseeing in Rome. They were at the Spanish Steps when they saw someone collapse. His two friends were Scouts and immediately started CPR while my son ran for help. They kept up the CPR until the 1st responders got there in 5 minutes and took over. They never found out what the outcome was for the victim. My son immediately signed up for a CPR class when he got back. He didn't want to feel that helpless again if he encountered that situation again, even though going for help definitely got 1st responders there quicker. I believe there were also a number of other students that heard the story and signed up as well.
 

RG33

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I always thought that the medical personnel who saved Clint Malarchuk’s life was the best “medical” story I had ever heard of or seen, but this is giving that a run for it’s money.

Awesome news so far for this young man and hope the good news keeps coming!
 

Salem's Lot

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I always thought that the medical personnel who saved Clint Malarchuk’s life was the best “medical” story I had ever heard of or seen, but this is giving that a run for it’s money.

Awesome news so far for this young man and hope the good news keeps coming!
The Malarchuk story is remarkable. The trainer literally had to run across the ice with a towel in seconds before he bled out.
 

Ed Hillel

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Dec 12, 2007
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'Not being dead' seems like a pretty big win to me.
I guess it depends on perspective. Collapsing on the field from cardiac arrest in an unprecedented event and hoping to be normal isn’t exactly “winning the game of life.” He had a one in a million horrible thing happen. But living is obviously good once it happened.
The Malarchuk story is remarkable. The trainer literally had to run across the ice with a towel in seconds before he bled out.
As I recall, that trainer had been in Vietnam and had a guy bleed out from a slash wound to the neck and he was subsequently taught to hold together the carotid artery if it ever happened again. I doubt he imagined it would ever happen that way, but he did it and dude saved his life.

By far the worst injury I’ve ever seen on a sports field. I didn’t sleep right after I saw it the first time.
 

Reverend

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The Malarchuk story is remarkable. The trainer literally had to run across the ice with a towel in seconds before he bled out.
That trainer was a Vietnam vet, FWIW. Sorta re-emphasizes my thoughts here: It's good to have people who know what to do around, and having training in what to do in such situations, frankly, feels awesome.
 

DeJesus Built My Hotrod

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The medical staff who worked on Hamlin at the stadium and hospital saved not only Demar but they did good for a lot of other people including the Bills and the NFL. They are heroes and deserve all the credit they get.
 

Reverend

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As I recall, that trainer had been in Vietnam and had a guy bleed out from a slash wound to the neck and he was subsequently taught to hold together the carotid artery if it ever happened again. I doubt he imagined it would ever happen that way, but he did it and dude saved his life.
There appears to be a good deal of "print the legend" surrounding that guy.

Which is fine, to an extent, except insofar as it obscures the critical fact that the most important thing he did was not to act with great expertise or experience, but to act immediately and without delay. This wasn''t about rocket surgery, it was about immediate compression. And the guy was a fucking rockstar in not hesitating in front of tens of thousands of people.
 

Reverend

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The medical staff who worked on Hamlin at the stadium and hospital saved not only Demar but they did good for a lot of other people including the Bills and the NFL. They are heroes and deserve all the credit they get.
Seconded. And maybe some viewers at home, too...
 

GeorgeCostanza

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I know it's often an unpopular take in that it imposes duty against freedom, but, as per my engagement with @Valek123 above, I would absolutely love to see First Responder training become part of our public education curriculum.

Imagine if everyone everywhere had an understanding of how health crises worked. I don't mean being doctors, but a basic relationship to the biological phenomena that is, well, frickin' life. How to understand it cognitively, and how to respond in crisis, intertwined. Is there really not 20 hours out of the four year curriculum that couldn't be put for... that??
CPR certification was a requirement for my HS graduation back in 1997. My older son graduated last year and had no such requirement. It is indeed a shame.
 
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Arroyoyo

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Dec 13, 2021
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CPR certification was a requirement for my HS graduation back in 1997. My older son graduated last year and had no such requirement. It is indeed and shame.
I get it every two years (along with AED). It’s a great training to have but the American Red Cross, in recent years, has gone out of its way to over-complicate the course with somewhat pricey training materials and e-books. Which of course is par for course with most levels of academia these days, but it’s excessive for CPR/AED and just creates unnecessary financial barriers for people.

Fortunately the team I work with encourages us to ignore purchasing that stuff and just come to the class for the lecture, live exercise, and test.
 

ngruz25

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Sep 20, 2005
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Just wait until he checks the status of his $7M toy drive.
This all must be incredibly confusing and disorienting for the guy. He has no idea the severity of his condition, right? The last thing he probably remembers is making some routine football plays in a big Monday night game. His medical team will need to explain to him that his injury caused an unprecedented event in NFL history. That he's now a household name and the major rooting interest in sports fandom. And that his very small charity drive has exploded beyond anyone's wildest expectations.

Wild stuff.
 

BigSoxFan

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This all must be incredibly confusing and disorienting for the guy. He has no idea the severity of his condition, right? The last thing he probably remembers is making some routine football plays in a big Monday night game. His medical team will need to explain to him that his injury caused an unprecedented event in NFL history. That he's now a household name and the major rooting interest in sports fandom. And that his very small charity drive has exploded beyond anyone's wildest expectations.

Wild stuff.
Yeah, like, at what point as a doctor do you let the patient know how close to death he/she was? For all he knows, he was just knocked out really badly.
 

Valek123

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Incredible news, that EMS group, ER staff, critical care team and more did a fantastic job. So damn cool to see neurologically intact, I will never forget the first time I heard that news(quite literally brought me to tears) and can’t imagine how those EMTs must feel knowing that everything they did step by step was visible to millions. Excellent job under incredible pressure!
Potentially best case outcome, great news to kick off the new year!!
 

canderson

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Wonderful news. I was told by a good source in the western part of the state Tuesday they believed he’d be ok but thought it’d be a long recovery to fully communicating. Terrific - first responders deserve so much praise.
 

8slim

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Sorry if this has been posted already, but the NY Times has a new article with some of the audio recordings from the medical teams. Some good info here too on the number and types of medical personnel etc the NFL has on the field for a game.

nytimes.com/2023/01/05/sports/football/damar-hamlin-response-audio-recording.html
This is a great piece. In a time where there is so much incompetence everywhere, it’s inspiring to see the incredible acts of highly trained, highly prepared personnel.