Beilein to Cavs as new HC

Average Reds

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I am absolutely in shock.

Beilein is a coaches' coach, and had the perfect situation in Ann Arbor. At the same time, this must have been something he really felt the need to do - to see if he could do it at the pro level. And he won't get another crack at it.

Godspeed and good luck. (You'll need it with the Cavs.)
 

Zososoxfan

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Oh man, this is some rough news to wake up to a Monday morning. Coach B deserves the chance to challenge himself and make some serious money (likely close to retirement too), but there had to be better opportunities out there. I wish the man nothing but luck, as long as he doesn't take Luke Yaklich with him.
 
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I think it's a situation where the NBA has always appealed to Beilein, and knows this is his last chance. Either do this now or plan on retiring when done at Michigan. Although everyone close to the situation is optimistic, this is also a case where their statuses align. Cleveland is not in a good position to attract the hotshot younger candidates like for example Philly would if Brown were to be fired, and Beilein is looking to cross this off his bucket list and this position is a softer landing spot as opposed to a high pressure situation.

This feels like the stable coach before the winning coach situation/understanding between the parties, a "Jim O'Brien" you can call it. But Beilein is such a good coach I could see the Cavs compete level going up quicker than people think...
 

kenneycb

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They generally don't get 5 star recruits so I can't imagine there is a Robert Traylor/Chris Webber-esque scandal coming up the pike.
 

HomeRunBaker

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That’s a shock. That’s a job with no upside moving forward with a terrible owner, and giving up a huge college job.
The collegiate coaching scandals are just beginning and nobody is safe. I expect others to get out of that shztstorm before their reputations (unfairly) get tarnished as well.

They generally don't get 5 star recruits so I can't imagine there is a Robert Traylor/Chris Webber-esque scandal coming up the pike.
Illegal benefits to players aren’t restricted to only the best of the best. I personally know of a player who transferred to Gardner-Webb because they paid him with the thickest envelope ($10k back in the 80’s).
 

thehitcat

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I think Coach B's style will work well in the NBA pace and space era. I'm sad for Michigan but I agree with the above that if he wanted to take the chance that he should go for it.
 

cheech13

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Beilein is one of the college guys that everyone seems to think will be a successful NBA coach. It's not crazy that he'd jump especially with the commitment of a five-year deal. What is surprising is that he'd go to Cleveland. They don't exactly have the best ownership/front office reputation and there were rumors that he could have had the Lakers job due to the Pelinka-Michigan connection. Sexton and a top five pick is a decent start but they are many years from competing.
 
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Soxfan in Fla

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Probably got sick of actually winning conference titles and making a couple final fours only to sit in the shadows of a clown who is overpaid, revered by the media and won absolutely nothing.
 

Average Reds

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The reporting on this is pretty consistent - he was growing tired of the changes to the college game, and the need to constantly bring in top recruits simply didn't mesh with the way he liked to operate, which is to develop players over time. He also wanted to test himself at the top level and if he didn't do it now, it was never happening.

I loved watching Beilein's teams and am saddened that he's leaving. I wish him the best and hope they find someone who can live up to his record.
 

HomeRunBaker

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The reporting on this is pretty consistent - he was growing tired of the changes to the college game, and the need to constantly bring in top recruits simply didn't mesh with the way he liked to operate, which is to develop players over time. He also wanted to test himself at the top level and if he didn't do it now, it was never happening.

I loved watching Beilein's teams and am saddened that he's leaving. I wish him the best and hope they find someone who can live up to his record.
Didn’t he interview with an NBA team around 4-5 years ago too? It seems like this was a direction he’s always wanted to pursue. I’m more surprised an organization would invest in a 66-yr old who is new to the league

Everyone at that level is involved in shady recruiting.
I wouldn’t even call it “shady”......it’s just how business is conducted throughout the business.
 
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Captaincoop

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Didn’t he interview with an NBA team around 4-5 years ago too? It seems like this was a direction he’s always wanted to pursue. I’m more surprised an organization would invest in a 66-yr old who is new to the league


I wouldn’t even call it “shady”......it’s just how business is conducted throughout the business.
It's done illicitly, it's against the rules of the governing body they compete for, and it involves lying to their employers and usually committing some form of financial fraud/tax evasion.

I know coaches like to tell themselves that it's just business and everyone does it, but at the end of the day, it's also really fucking shady.
 

Doug Beerabelli

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Makes sense. Take a shot on coaching in the NBA. Make some real good money. If it works, great. If not, you get paid well for 5 years and wait out the scandals and/or the changes to the system resulting from the same. If reputation remains somewhat intact, he can get another college job.
 

Soxfan in Fla

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Didn’t he interview with an NBA team around 4-5 years ago too? It seems like this was a direction he’s always wanted to pursue. I’m more surprised an organization would invest in a 66-yr old who is new to the league


I wouldn’t even call it “shady”......it’s just how business is conducted throughout the business.
No. Interviewed with Pistons when Casey was ultimately offered the job after last season.
 

bosockboy

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Makes sense. Take a shot on coaching in the NBA. Make some real good money. If it works, great. If not, you get paid well for 5 years and wait out the scandals and/or the changes to the system resulting from the same. If reputation remains somewhat intact, he can get another college job.
The Mike Montgomery model. Almost identical situation.
 

HomeRunBaker

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The Mike Montgomery model. Almost identical situation.
The two differences I see is that Montgomery was 56 when he left Stanford for the NBA while Beilein is 66 along with the college scandals many of which likely haven’t even hit yet. I’d be surprised if he returned to the college game at least at a high level.
 

Average Reds

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The two differences I see is that Montgomery was 56 when he left Stanford for the NBA while Beilein is 66 along with the college scandals many of which likely haven’t even hit yet. I’d be surprised if he returned to the college game at least at a high level.
I get that being the cynical is your shtick. I also understand that college athletics is an inherently corrupt activity.

That said. you have a track record of making outlandish predictions to be edgy without anything to back it up. Do better.
 

HomeRunBaker

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I get that being the cynical is your shtick. I also understand that college athletics is an inherently corrupt activity.

That said. you have a track record of making outlandish predictions to be edgy without anything to back it up. Do better.
It is that outlandish to feel that this isn’t the last of these scandals that finally change the state of college athletics? You admit yourself that the game is corrupt. It isn’t nuts to feel a 70-year old wouldn’t want to return to that.
 

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I'm not sure there's ever been another coach who's followed Beilein's career path.

He's never been an assistant, at any level. He went from high school JV to high school varsity to junior college to Division III to Division II to low-major Division I to mid-major Division I to high-major Division I to, now, the NBA.

Amazing.
 

Captaincoop

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I get that being the cynical is your shtick. I also understand that college athletics is an inherently corrupt activity.

That said. you have a track record of making outlandish predictions to be edgy without anything to back it up. Do better.
What is outlandish about that statement? The NCAA itself has said publicly it is looking to dig into the information transpiring from the FBI investigation - which included a bunch of college coaches talking about how much and how to pay elite recruits. The NCAA's incompetence and likely inability to prove the cases aside, it's not crazy to say that there is more public scandal coming.
 

Average Reds

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It is that outlandish to feel that this isn’t the last of these scandals that finally change the state of college athletics? You admit yourself that the game is corrupt. It isn’t nuts to feel a 70-year old wouldn’t want to return to that.
Let me rewind - the speculation up thread was not about “the state of the college game,” it was about whether Beilein was leaving to get ahead of a scandal about to break at Michigan.

Michigan does not have a pristine history; they had one of the worst scandals in college basketball in the 90s. But there’s no evidence that Beilein has ever been a part of that. To the contrary, he has walked into two programs with dodgy reputations (West Virginia and Michigan) and, by all accounts, run them as honestly as possible. (And yes, I’m aware that may be damming him with faint praise.)

If the post I originally quoted was not about Beilein, but about the college game in general, then I misunderstood. I do agree with your post above.