Arthur D’Angelo - RIP

DadOfFenway

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Arthur D’Angelo, the all-star of Fenway souvenirs and apparel, dies at 97 A wonderful man with a grand family who built a company and friends that make the D’Angelos a large part of the Boston culture. We had a chance encounter nine years ago when walking the streets and got to try his ring on - amazing memories.

 

jacklamabe65

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Arthur used to keep the Sovener Ship open during Pats games in the 1960s when they played at Fenway. I bought a Pat's banner and their yearbook there, and later on, I bought a Jim Nance poster. Even though the area at the time supported the Giants over the Pats (thanks to then Channel 5, WHDH TV), Arthur and family regularly sold Patriots appeal and memorabilia. For that, I was and remain grateful.
 

macal

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Jul 31, 2005
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I had the pleasure of having various telephone conversations with him when we were doing some work at the store around 25 years ago. I've dealt with probably 30,000-40,000 clients over the years, and he is right there at the top, among my all time favorite clients. He was a gentleman to me, but, more importantly, he was a gentleman to the workers we had on site.
 

Devizier

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Jul 3, 2000
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I always loved that Twins operated separately from Fenway and the Red Sox. Something I didn’t really appreciate until I started living elsewhere.
 

Harry Hooper

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Jan 4, 2002
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That’s a great article in that last link
This section was new to me:

A first at Fenway - The man who invented Wally The Green Monster is currently senior vice president for Fenway Concerts and Entertainment. Larry Cancro, a 31-year veteran with the organization has probably forgotten more than most people remember about their time at Fenway Park. The few moments left with him are filled with outstanding stories and recollections of team play, but also behind-the-scenes marketing and innovation and the beginning of traditions that last today.

“In 1986, my second year with the team, we had both national and local merchandise licensees and our local licensee was ’47, or Twins,” he says. “And one day I’m talking with Bobby (D’Angelo) and he said, ‘If only there was some way the fans could see the championship merchandise on the players, we could sell a lot more of it.’ And a light bulb went on. And I thought, ‘I’m going to hand it to them to see if they’ll put it on.’

We were pretty far ahead in the division, so I had special hats and shirts made up. When we won the division championship, I handed them to the players. Some of them looked at me like, ‘What do you want me to do with this?’ I said, ‘Put it on.’ Some did, some of them thought I was a jerk, but that was the first time in the history of sports that players put on special championship hats and shirts after a win. And sales, of course, skyrocketed. Now every sport does it. In fact, I’ve heard players on the field after games saying, ‘Where’s my hat?’ It’s done all the time now. But the first time it ever happened was in Fenway Park.”
 

Harry Hooper

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WSJ published a story on Arthur today: Arthur D’Angelo, the ‘Mayor of Fenway Park,’ Dies at 97 - WSJ

In the late 1940s, they heard about the Freedom Train, a display of historical U.S. documents, including the Bill of Rights and the Declaration of Independence, rolling on railroad tracks around the country. The twins arranged to print copies of some of those documents for sale to people visiting the train. They followed the train around the country and began selling water as well. At one point, Arthur D’Angelo said, the twins spotted President Harry Truman paying a visit to the train.

“We gave him a glass of water for nothing,” D’Angelo said in the oral history. “We charged everybody except President Truman.”