Adding additional Access Point to WIFI - Need a little help

wilked

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Jul 17, 2005
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I have my router installed on second floor of old house in a closet (plaster walls). It's an Asus AC1300. Does a good job distributing throughout the house, but I'd like to add a second point on 1st floor.

I have some ethernet run throughout the house from this 2nd floor closet. One goes to the basement and is used for my solar panels. I plan to add a switch in the basement, then from this switch send a new ethernet line to the first floor for the new repeater.

Any suggestions on what model to use? Should I just get another AC1300? Will this work?

Thanks
 

RSN Diaspora

molests goats for comedy
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Jul 29, 2005
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Washington, DC
I have my router installed on second floor of old house in a closet (plaster walls). It's an Asus AC1300. Does a good job distributing throughout the house, but I'd like to add a second point on 1st floor.

I have some ethernet run throughout the house from this 2nd floor closet. One goes to the basement and is used for my solar panels. I plan to add a switch in the basement, then from this switch send a new ethernet line to the first floor for the new repeater.

Any suggestions on what model to use? Should I just get another AC1300? Will this work?

Thanks
Have you considered a powerline adapter? We were having issues in our oldest kid's bedroom, and solved them with this:

View: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0725LPTZR/
 

wilked

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Jul 17, 2005
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Also, terminology - looking to add an Access Point, not repeater

What are pros/cons of a router as an Access Point vs that Powerline Adapter?
 

GoJeff!

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May 30, 2007
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If you have ethernet going where you want an access point, you don't need a powerline adapter. Ethernet (at least a decent Gigabit implementation) will be faster than any powerline adapter.

Also, I've had mixed results with powerline adapters. I purchased one pair of TP-Link powerline adapters to get a better signal to a TV room where I can't run ethernet. They worked very well, with speeds fine for 4K video, etc. Then I bought a third for the other side of the house because I was too lazy to run ethernet. This one is slow and loses the signal all the time.
 

RSN Diaspora

molests goats for comedy
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Jul 29, 2005
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Could you talk me through how this is connected?
Sure. There is a base unit that plugs into the wall and is connected by ethernet cable to your router. There is a second unit that plugs into an outlet where you would want your second router to be. It can either be used to hardwire in something internet-enabled or as a wifi extender.

That said, it isn't the same thing as an access point, so it likely isn't what you're looking for.
 

begranter

Couldn't get into a real school
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Jul 9, 2007
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I have my router installed on second floor of old house in a closet (plaster walls). It's an Asus AC1300. Does a good job distributing throughout the house, but I'd like to add a second point on 1st floor.

I have some ethernet run throughout the house from this 2nd floor closet. One goes to the basement and is used for my solar panels. I plan to add a switch in the basement, then from this switch send a new ethernet line to the first floor for the new repeater.

Any suggestions on what model to use? Should I just get another AC1300? Will this work?

Thanks
You don't necessarily need a router to do this, just a wireless access point device. You have a ton of options that somewhat depend on your networking technical aptitude and needs. If you need/want to be able to connect a device via ethernet at the new AP (i.e. for a work computer, streaming, gaming, or really any device that is stationary to lighten the load on wireless connections), that will filter out many AP devices that only have ethernet inputs and no outputs. I imagine an ASUS AC1300 would be able to do what you're trying to do and it's relatively affordable, but there may be a better option for your specific use case.

If you use a router, you'll have to go into the set-up page and configure it correctly -- if you're comfortable with this it's no problem and many modern routers have "AP Mode" as an option on their web-based set up pages. If that seems daunting you may want to go for a dedicated WAP device that has less set-up options. The core difference is a router assigns and distributes the credentials for the devices in addition to being an access point, while a WAP device acts as only an access point and does not assign IP addresses etc. You must have a router between the modem and any wireless APs.
30768


I'm currently using an 'old' Archer C7 v2 as an AP by disabling DHCP and setting the devices LAN address as a stable IP within the range of the settings of the router, and matching the SSIN and wireless passwords. When doing your setup, use a handy-dandy WiFi analyzer app to see which channels are best for a new AP. A lot of the AP modes will default to the same channel as your wireless router, but this isn't always best. When doing set-up it's usually better to have the AP device and computer accessing the web-based tool not connected to the main network until configuration is complete.
 

cgori

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Oct 2, 2004
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SF, CA
Great picture linked by @begranter - that's exactly how you want it to look (ISP, then modem, then router, then switch, then access point). The router typically also serves as a firewall, so you always want it to be between any device on your network and the modem.

You can use an AC1300 as an access point - you want to figure out the channels as noted above, but setting them to "same" to start out will usually get you going at the beginning.

Since you already have the GigE cables, I wouldn't go the powerline route, normally that's for when you don't have ethernet cable available. Get a cheap switch (any 8 port unmanaged switch will do).
 

wilked

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Jul 17, 2005
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Thanks. This WAP will only provide WIFI to our outside patio area, nothing else will connect to it.

I think I'll give it a go with a switch and a new router (to be set up as a WAP).
 

cgori

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Oct 2, 2004
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SF, CA
Thanks. This WAP will only provide WIFI to our outside patio area, nothing else will connect to it.

I think I'll give it a go with a switch and a new router (to be set up as a WAP).
Small afterthought - I'm assuming there is a handy AC outlet to plug in the WAP, but if not, consider a power over ethernet switch. If you don't need it, don't bother because they add a fair bit to the cost though.
 

wilked

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Jul 17, 2005
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Small afterthought - I'm assuming there is a handy AC outlet to plug in the WAP, but if not, consider a power over ethernet switch. If you don't need it, don't bother because they add a fair bit to the cost though.
Thanks. I have power right where I need it.

I may be back to this thread once everything arrives and I’m setting it up!
 

begranter

Couldn't get into a real school
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Jul 9, 2007
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Thanks. This WAP will only provide WIFI to our outside patio area, nothing else will connect to it.

I think I'll give it a go with a switch and a new router (to be set up as a WAP).
That'll probably work fine but if it's just for outside, I'd recommend a dedicated outdoor WAP. Having it outside with direct line of sight to where you'll most be using it will make a difference in latency. Something like the TP-Link EAP225-Outdoor Omada AC1200 is about the same price as the ASUS router but is weatherproof and designed for outdoor use. Having the 5 GHz channel with direct line of sight for your patio space will be *chef's kiss*
 

gtmtnbiker

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Jul 15, 2005
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My recommendation is Ubiquiti UniFi access point. I just bought this one a couple of months ago.

View: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07DWW3P6K


I've been using their products since 2013 (checked my Amazon history). They're very reliable. Bought a total of 4 over the past 7 years (one for my church, one for my in-laws and two for myself). I stopped using it for myself in 2016 because it only supported the 802.11n and I got a new Netgear R8000 router with ac. About 2 months ago, I started having issues with the 5Ghz band crashing on a regular basis. I switched to using my Verizon Quantum router as an access point and it also crashed.

The one for my church I bought in 2017 and have not had to deal with it ever since. Reliable.

The product is geared towards the enterprise market so it might be a bit more complex to use but not that difficult. It's also highly recommended in /r/homenetworking Reddit forums.

It uses PoE (power over ethernet). It does come with a PoE injector if your router is not PoE aware. You can mount it on the ceiling, wall, where ever you want it. It's somewhat low profile, stylish looking.
 

wilked

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Jul 17, 2005
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Ok... bought a used ASUS RT-N66 router for $2 (dual-band wireless-N900 gigabit router). Also bought a simple 4 port switch for $15 and 50’ of Ethernet cable for $15.

Installed the switch in basement with existing Ethernet cable, then from that fed the new router near a basement window looking into my patio. Already had power there.

I setup the router as a WAN and gave it a new SSID. I debated sharing the existing SSID but decided against it.
Should I do anything with wireless channels or can I just leave it alone? Couldn’t find anywhere in the ASUS app to modify channels for some reason. I think that only would matter if I was sharing SSID, right?