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Why do you like Tiger Woods?

Discussion in 'General Sports' started by ConigliarosPotential, Jul 23, 2018.

  1. Koufax

    Koufax Well-Known Member Lifetime Member SoSH Member

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    I was home sick the day of that playoff and go to watch the whole thing. It was one of the most amazing performances I've ever seen. Can you imagine playing 18 holes under those conditions? And winning a playoff in a major? Inconceivable determination.
     
  2. cshea

    cshea Member SoSH Member

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    91 holes, plus all the practice. ESPN did an oral history on it earlier this year:

    https://www.google.com/amp/www.espn...-observers-marvel-tiger-2008-win?platform=amp

    Haney says he shot a 47 (Tiger says 50 something) for 9 holes trying to test out a knee brace like a week before the tournament. Wild.
     
  3. bosockboy

    bosockboy Member SoSH Member

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    Golf, like tennis, is built around 4 tournaments a year that matter in the historical context of the sport. Individual sports, these two in particular, classify greatness solely on number of majors won. Nicklaus had 18, and I think it was that lofty perch that drove people to love Tiger and root for him. Catch Jack. Every major he didn't win or missed was an opportunity lost.
     
  4. RedOctober3829

    RedOctober3829 Member SoSH Member

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    I like Tiger Woods because it made golf fun to watch. A young, brash superstar who broke every mold. He came around when I was in middle school and he made me fall in love with the game. I was already playing, but he made me want to play even more.
     
  5. Bergs

    Bergs Member SoSH Member

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  6. deanx0

    deanx0 Well-Known Member Lifetime Member SoSH Member

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    I may be remembering this wrong, but when Tiger first came up, we still weren't that far from country clubs being open about their racist and bigoted membership policies--it was a game in America for rich white men. Hell, Augusta didn't have an African American member until like 1990.

    To see Woods destroying records in their sacred sport delighted me, so I will always pull for Tiger.
     
  7. Bergs

    Bergs Member SoSH Member

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    Absolutely.
     
  8. Jed Zeppelin

    Jed Zeppelin Member SoSH Member

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    I'm not as much of a golf fan as many here probably are (probably because of Tiger's absence), so maybe this is off base, but I would throw Bobby Orr into the mix as a comparison. Not just showing up and being the best player immediately on arrival, but fundamentally changing the way the game was played, what golfers could do, how they could prepare. To my amateur eye, he invented the modern pro. Of course, his equal hasn't shown up yet.
     
  9. dcmissle

    dcmissle Deflatigator Lifetime Member SoSH Member

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    When you say highly dysfunctional, do you mean this or something more?



    October 6, 1978 — four days after the RS Yankees play-in game — when Tiger was 2.

    All I know about this childhood story is that his dad drove Tiger. If there something else, please enlighten me.

    Ted Williams, in this respect, seems to have had an entirely different experience. He made a mad dash TO baseball. Dad was a drifter, mom was married to the Salvation Army, Ted was left pretty much alone to do as he pleased.
     
  10. cshea

    cshea Member SoSH Member

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    Earl Woods was a womanizer, just like his son would become.
     
  11. FL4WL3SS

    FL4WL3SS Member SoSH Member

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    So was Arnie, what's your point?
     
  12. Average Reds

    Average Reds Dope Staff Member Dope V&N Mod SoSH Member

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    I think he’s responding to dc’s question to me. I made the comment that Tiger, like Ted Williams, grew up in a dysfunctional household, which I think is a fair characterization.

    https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.golfdigest.com/story/golf-earl-woods-book-0921/amp

    There are obvious differences, as Early Woods was most decidedly not absent from Tiger’s life. However, there’s also a reason that Earl’s widow reportedly had him buried in an unmarked grave.

    He did push Tiger to become the greatest golfer on the planet. So he’s got that going for him.
     
    #62 Average Reds, Jul 25, 2018
    Last edited: Jul 25, 2018
  13. BigMike

    BigMike Dope Dope

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    really is this the same society where a few poor attempt a humor tweets from more than a decade ago can turn your from a loved icon, into some lowlife who is unemployable by proper society now? OK enough with the V&N stuff.

    I am on the other side of the Tiger fence. To me he quickly ascended to vilan status, and is very easy to root against. Mind you it remains a good thing having him back, because honestly the tour needs a vilan. There are others who can be dislikeable (DJ, but he absolute lack of personality at all ust makes him blah, go away), or Speith for any number of reasons being almost the anti-Tiger, but yet somehow just as easy to dislike.
     
  14. dcmissle

    dcmissle Deflatigator Lifetime Member SoSH Member

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    So papa was a rollin’ stone. That’s an old American story, an ancient human story.

    Sticking a golf club in the hands of a two-year old is not.
     
  15. Zomp

    Zomp Turkey Virgin Dope

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  16. Bergs

    Bergs Member SoSH Member

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  17. dcmissle

    dcmissle Deflatigator Lifetime Member SoSH Member

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  18. Marciano490

    Marciano490 Urological Expert SoSH Member

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    Do these guys get to eat and drink and pee during rounds? I’m wondering how hunger might affect them and the effect of carrying more muscle on metabolism.
     
  19. steveluck7

    steveluck7 Member SoSH Member

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    There are port-o-johns around the course that they use. I’m sure there are permanent facilities at spots on most courses as well.
    Every now and then, you’ll catch them grabbing a bar of some sort from their bag and eating it. Usually while waiting to hit a tee shot
     
  20. LoweTek

    LoweTek Well-Known Member Lifetime Member SoSH Member

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    I think it's interesting he is close to Jordan. Best analog for his life.
     
  21. johnmd20

    johnmd20 literally like ebola Lifetime Member Gold Supporter SoSH Member

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    Every now and then you'll catch a view of the players eating a sandwich or a power bar. They definitely eat. And they go to the bathroom in the middle of the greens, but the TV cameras cut away when that happens.
     
  22. luckysox

    luckysox Eeyore Bronze Supporter SoSH Member

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    That was a great piece by Thompson. And man, if you don't feel at least half sorry for Tiger - because dude is messed up - well, then I don't know what to tell you. I would LOVE to see him win a major again, walk to the presser, drop a ball on the table and say, "I'm done" and just walk out. But he's too old to join the navy now...
     
  23. BigMike

    BigMike Dope Dope

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    Haha, I think most players eat during a round. And no doubt all keep themselves hydrated. I think they generally try to avoid the pitstops along the way, but it no doubt happens. It was a big deal the other day when Kutcher took a pit stop and then basically had to rush to meet his tee time,

    I will say one of the biggest frustrations with me on Tiger, and it isn't even his fault.

    Monday morning after the Open, I glance at the USA today, and at the top of the first page was a good sized picture of Tiger, with some headline like Tiger's back. Tiger is always a bigger story than the event itself
     
  24. snowmanny

    snowmanny Well-Known Member Gold Supporter SoSH Member

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    I'm sitting here half-watching Big Brother during the rain delay, and "Curtis Strange" popped in my head. And then I found this from The Golf Channel replaying the part of Strange's interview with Woods when the vet snickered at the brand new pro

    https://www.golfchannel.com/video/twenty-years-ago-tiger-explains-winning-mindset/
     
  25. Papelbon's Poutine

    Papelbon's Poutine Homeland Security SoSH Member

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    Remember the time they messed up the feed and we saw Daly taking a dump in the cup? That was awesome.
     
  26. Zomp

    Zomp Turkey Virgin Dope

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    Tiger has been known to eat a power bar a hole.

    In the bag your typical tour pro will have protein bars, bananas, almonds, a peanut butter sangwich, etc...

    Nowadays I don’t think conditioning is a factor unless they’re playing 36.
     
  27. Papelbon's Poutine

    Papelbon's Poutine Homeland Security SoSH Member

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    Plus you have Bones hiding cans of Pepsi on every hole, they can always steal those for a sugar rush.
     
  28. Marciano490

    Marciano490 Urological Expert SoSH Member

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    Wait... they pee on the greens? Do the caddies block them off from the fans? What about the coins they’re always putting down and pick up there?
     
  29. Comfortably Lomb

    Comfortably Lomb Koko the Monkey SoSH Member

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    I’m not sure what to make of the “boarish” behavior comment. I generous reading is displeasure with Tiger’s more aggressive tone on the course that clashed with the traditional/reserved/polite/gentlemanly golf culture. I think that was a feature, not a bug, though.
     
  30. DennyDoyle'sBoil

    DennyDoyle'sBoil Found no thrill on Blueberry Hill SoSH Member

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    I know there are a number of golf fans here, so I'll avoid my usual golf rant. But put simply the reason that I like Tiger is that I don't care for golf. He kind of gave it the middle finger but from within so it was even more effective. I like him for the same reason I like the Rodney Dangerfield character in Caddyshack. Or maybe Chevy Chase. I love that he came out of the box and tore up the course at a club that didn't have a member that looked like him until just a few years before.

    Also, I find it very difficult to watch golf. I need a rooting interest to commit 3 hours of time and household capital on televised sports. I have no basis on which to develop a rooting interest in golf. I don't understand how anyone does. How does one decide to root for Phil Mickelson over Jordan Spieth? By what ball they play? Their home towns? I root for laundry in team sports. Or countries in international sports. (So, like the Ryder Cup is watchable.) But golf to me is like Nascar. How to make oneself care whether 42 beats 30? When Tiger's on the course, I can root for him, because I like him because I perceive that he shook up the establishment in a way that makes me smile.

    As for the art versus the artist question, I don't think they are separable. Fuck Roman Polanski. I'm not an expert on Tiger's personal life, but my understanding is that he never really did anything deplorable or evil, but had human failings that many athletes have. (If I'm wrong about that, I'm willing to listen. I don't follow it closely.)
     
  31. Papelbon's Poutine

    Papelbon's Poutine Homeland Security SoSH Member

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    You root for Phil because he has a personality; he's gregarious, he (not so much anymore) makes stupid crazy choices trying to pull off crazy shots and because he's a magician with a wedge; there's literally not a shot he couldn't hit and hasn't tried. When you see him fuck up and slice a driver on 18 and screw up his chances, when he could have hit an iron and been fine, you commiserate, because that's what a lot of us hackers do. He interacts with fans, morphed from being known as a cocky jackass as youngster to a mentor to the young guys on tour and had Tiger not been born, he'd be considered the greatest golfer of his generation. Speith is basically the Arod or Jeter of the golf world, built in a PR test tube, with some nice back story, but bland as hell; he's an amazing golfer and plenty of people love him (I don't), but in my opinion he has zero charisma and watching him live he actually turns me off with his histrionics.

    If you don't follow golf or you don't play, then sure, I understand where you're coming from. A lot of attaching to a particular player is just simply watching them, appreciating certain parts of their game, the way the are on the course, etc. It's not any different from any other sport, laundry or otherwise. You emotionally attach to a person from your experiences watching them.
     
  32. terrynever

    terrynever Member SoSH Member

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    I get a sense of awe watching pro golfers hit shots that goes beyond the respect we all have for great athletes in other sports. It's easy for those of us who appreciate golf to follow any of the professionals. Hell, I love watching the best amateurs play at the Northeast in RI every June. There are a few hundred spectators, at most. You pick a guy like Dustin Johnson when he played there in 2007. He killed it even then. To stand on the tee and watch the ball disappear 300 yards down the fairway is unreal. Just the flight of the ball.
    Television doesn't really capture the power of the game. The cameras focus on the greens. Putting is boring. But watching golf in person is like standing behind second base and seeing Pedroia turn two. No other sport lets the fans get that close.
     
  33. Papelbon's Poutine

    Papelbon's Poutine Homeland Security SoSH Member

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    17,599
    It’s a completely different game they’re playing. It’s like looking at a Rembrandt when you’re still working at paint by numbers levels.
     
  34. InstaFace

    InstaFace MDLzera

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    This is all I'll say on this in a golf thread, but: try attending a tennis tournament (ideally the first week of the US Open). Every court except the stadium feature court(s) lets spectators wander in on their own time, seat themselves, and be literally 30 feet from the action. Or stand on the non-stands side, which is just standing room or 3-row bleachers, and be literally 20 feet from the action. And if the match you're watching gets boring, you get up and go to one of the other 10+ courts with a match going on.

    But other than that exception I agree with you, and it doesn't take away from your larger point.
     
  35. terrynever

    terrynever Member SoSH Member

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    14,249
    Never thought of tennis! Great point.
    I've found a golf ball for players and then stood 5 feet away while they played their shot, sometimes talking to the fans. Lee Trevino would talk to anybody.
     
  36. dcmissle

    dcmissle Deflatigator Lifetime Member SoSH Member

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    He’s right. Did what he described at Wimbledon few weeks ago.

    Athleticism insane. Different species.
     
  37. BigMike

    BigMike Dope Dope

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    A good buddy won at Newport a couple of time.

    First time I saw him play at a tournament he was playing Todd Martin. I am standing behind a 4 foot fence maybe 15 feet behind the player, (basically as close as where the ball boys stand at Wimbledon) as my buddy is hitting 132 mph serves which if not returned are headed right at the fans. Pretty great stuff.
     
  38. garlan5

    garlan5 Member SoSH Member

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    2,539
    Anyone question tiger and ped use. I know his name was on the list when arod or bartolo got called out. It seems odd how quickly he went downhill after his marriage fell apart. I never hated him but never cared a lot for him either. Same with Phil
     
  39. SoxJox

    SoxJox Member SoSH Member

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    3,603
    There are almost limitless positive and negative things that can be said about Tiger Woods. But then this: courses redesigned holes in an effort to "Tiger-proof" them.

    Augusta lengthened half their holes by adding over 350 yards prior to the 2002 event. Olympia Fields added over 300 yards for the 2003 US Open. For the 2008 US Open, Torrey Pines grew to 7,600+ yards (ouch). And while not being lengthened, Bethpage Black's selection in part may have been influenced by length.

    Now, some could and do argue that lengthening just made it that much harder on the shorter-hitting players. But the mere thought that some effort was needed to "Tiger proof" any course? I can't think of another golfer where that statement can be made. He was transformational, both figuratively and literally.
     
  40. Papelbon's Poutine

    Papelbon's Poutine Homeland Security SoSH Member

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    Yes, he took treatment from Galea, but nothing beyond platelet therapy ever came of the investigation.

    It really doesn’t seem odd at all, to me at least; the Thanksgiving Day incident was basically the culmination of a lot of physical, mental and emotional stuff he’d been going through for a long time. He was wreck less with both his body and his personal life. If you have any interest in reading more into it, this is a good start:

    http://www.espn.com/espn/feature/st...-life-unraveled-years-father-earl-woods-death
     
  41. Comfortably Lomb

    Comfortably Lomb Koko the Monkey SoSH Member

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    “Tiger Proofing” was basically modifying courses to suit his game vs. a chunk of the tour. The marketing wizard behind that won the day. Somehow they made giving him an advantage seem like it was done to keep him from winning.
     
  42. SoxJox

    SoxJox Member SoSH Member

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    The larger point remains valid: the effort, whatever its real or imagined intent or interpretation of effect, was borne by various course management groups changing their layouts because of him.
     
  43. SumnerH

    SumnerH Malt Liquor Picker Dope

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    Todd Martin's probably my favorite 2nd tier tennis player of all time. Watching him play—fairly successfully—an antiquated style into the late 90s and early 2000s was fun, especially his battles at the 1999 US Open. Didn't hurt that he looked like he was 50 even at 30.
     

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