SOSH has a new author

BaseballJones

ivanvamp
SoSH Member
Oct 1, 2015
14,838
Ok here's an excerpt from Chapter 8...


So often in baseball, a squander by one team is followed by the other team scoring the very next time up. Boston had a great chance to cut into New York’s lead in the seventh, and even had a real possibility of tying the game or taking the lead with one big swing of Manny Ramirez’ bat. But Tom Gordon escaped, and the Yankees exhaled, and came up to bat looking to add insurance runs and put Boston away.

Timlin stayed on to face Cairo, Jeter, and Rodriguez. Cairo led off and ripped the first pitch he saw into deep left center. It one-hopped the Green Monster. Damon tracked it down and fired – well, with Damon’s subpar arm, “fired” probably isn’t the right word– it to Cabrera, but Cairo had a stand-up double to start the inning.

At this point, the Yankees had two main options. Old-school baseball dictated a sacrifice bunt by Jeter, which could advance Cairo to third, which would have meant that a productive out could have scored a crucial insurance run. But the modern game is played differently.

Baseball statistician Tom Tango has done great work helping to explain the mathematics of baseball. One question that comes up all the time is: given the current situation, how many runs can we expect to score? And if we bunt here and move a runner along, how many runs can we expect to score in that situation? If the second situation has a lower run expectancy than the first, bunting makes little sense. Why, after all, put yourself in a situation that reduces the number of runs you can expect to score?

Statisticians have analyzed literally hundreds of thousands of baseball games to determine the expected runs in any given situation, based on real-world data. There are three primary situations where managers typically call for a sacrifice (this is not counting when a pitcher is up, in which case sacrificing is almost always the normal – and correct – play). The first is when there’s nobody out and a runner at first. Managers will sacrifice in order to move the runner to second – “scoring position” – in the hopes that one of the following hitters will get a single. That single likely will drive the runner in. But hits of any kind are hard to come by in baseball – even the best batters make outs far more than they get hits.

In the case of a runner at first and nobody out, the expected runs are 0.86. That is, if you get a runner at first to lead off the inning, you can expect, over time, to score 0.86 runs. This is because even though he’s another base further from home, there are still three outs to play with, which means more opportunities for an extra-base hit, or a play that can extend the inning. But if you sacrifice the runner to second, your expected runs drops to 0.66. In other words, you’re not only sacrificing an out, you’re sacrificing 20% of a chance to score a run in the process. Outs are the most precious currency in the game. Normally, a full 9-inning game provides 27 outs to spend. Giving away outs to marginally increase your chances of scoring a run is generally bad business, but it’s especially bad business if it decreases your chances of scoring.

A second case where we often see sacrifice bunts is when there’s a runner at second with no outs, and he is sacrificed to third. This is the situation the Yankees were in after Cairo’s double. Traditional baseball thinking held that if you have a runner at second, you need a hit to the outfield to score him, but if you have a runner at third with less than two outs, he could score on a wild pitch, a passed ball, a balk, an infield ground out, or a fly ball to the outfield, in addition to a hit of any kind. Scoring from third – even with one out – seemed more likely than scoring from second with no outs.

Run expectancy tells a different story. If you have a runner at second with nobody out, you can expect to score 1.10 runs. But if you have a runner at third with one out, you can expect to score 0.95 runs. Yes, in fact, a sacrifice in this situation yields fewer expected runs than a runner at second and nobody out. By Tango’s methodology, Boston’s win expectancy would actually rise marginally if Torre elected to have Jeter sacrifice Cairo to third.

By the strict mathematics, Joe Torre’s best play, especially with Jeter, Rodriguez, and Sheffield due up, was to leave Cairo at second and take three shots at getting him in.

The third most common scenario is when you have runners at first and second and nobody out. In that situation, your expected runs are 1.44, but if you bunt them over, now you’re looking at runners at second and third with one out, and your expected runs drop to 1.38. A small drop, but a drop nonetheless.

The bunt has a long and complicated history in the game of baseball. It showed up first in the early years of the game, in the 1870s, and fans criticized it as being unmanly. The Boston Globe in 1873 called bunting “the black game” (not in reference to skin tone but rather that bunting was a sign that a hitter knew he wasn’t very good and had to resort to trickery).

President William Taft joined the chorus in 1904 saying that fans should see players “hit it out for all that is in them”. In the movie Moneyball, Oakland A’s General Manager Billy Beane, played by Brad Pitt, shares with his players his philosophy on bunting. He says, “No bunting whatsoever. And if someone bunts on us, just pick it up and throw it to first. Don’t try to be a hero and go to second. Let them make the mistakes. And when your enemy’s making mistakes, don’t interrupt them. They’re giving you an out, man, they’re just giving it to you. Take it and say thank you.”

But even teams that understand the statistical reality behind bunting will bunt more in the playoffs than the regular season. Jeter, for example, bunted twice as often in the postseason (as a rate stat) than in the regular season. Teams play more “small ball” in the postseason, falling back on traditional thinking and run manufacturing than during the regular season. Part of this may have to do with the notion that they’re facing better pitching in the postseason, making it more difficult to score runs. Therefore, bunting and sacrificing and making productive outs become more important.

Whatever Torre’s rationale was, he decided to have Jeter bunt. Just as McCarver said, “He could be bunting here”, and pointed out that Jeter had executed a sacrifice bunt the game before, Timlin spun around to bluff a throw to second, trying to keep Cairo close to the bag. Any extra step Cairo could get towards third would make it more likely he could advance safely on a sacrifice.

“I think you give up too much by bunting here, however,” McCarver said. “Jeter’s natural stroke is the other way. Millar’s in (at first).” The idea, of course, is that with Jeter especially, his preference for going to the right side of the field – like he did in his previous at-bat on the three-run double – meant that even if he hit the ball on the ground at an infielder, that would be enough to get Cairo to third. So why not try to get a hit to right field, knowing that even if it resulted in an out, it would accomplish the same thing as giving yourself up in a sacrifice bunt.

Timlin delivered and Jeter squared to bunt. The pitch was low and Jeter let it go by for ball one. Sutcliffe pointed out how, with the infield in to deal with a sacrifice, huge holes opened up if Jeter were to swing away. But he squared around again and bunted a chopper in front of the mound. Timlin fielded it, took a quick glance at third, realized he had no play there, and took the safe out at first.

Torre played his card and now had Cairo at third with one out and Rodriguez coming up. The previous game, in the 11th inning, the Yankees had roughly the same scenario. In a tie game, Cairo had led off with a single, and Jeter advanced him to second with a sacrifice. Rodriguez had the chance to drive him in, but lined out to short. After Sheffield and Matsui walked, Bernie Williams flied out to end the threat. This time, Rodriguez came up only needing a fly ball to get Cairo in.

Boston brought the infield in, hoping to cut off a ground ball and prevent Cairo from scoring. Advanced metrics are helpful in this situation as well. On balls put in play, batters hit .296 with the infield at regular depth, but the runner from third scores 63% of the time. When the infield is in, batters hit .366, a huge increase in the likelihood of a hit, however, the run scores from third only 49% of the time.

Timlin’s first pitch was a strike. He missed with the next pitch to even the count. Boston could ill afford to let this run in. Overcoming a two-run deficit would be hard enough against Gordon and Rivera. Rodriguez was a more than proficient run-producer. During the 2004 season, he had come up with a runner on third with less than two out some 30 times. In those situations, he batted .333 with a .413 on-base percentage and a 1.046 OPS. Moreover, he drove in 31 runs in those 30 opportunities. He was the right man for New York to have up at the plate.

On the 1-1 pitch, Timlin missed again to make the count two balls and one strike. The difference in baseball between 2-1 and 1-2 is dramatic. For Rodriguez, his odds improved dramatically with that one change in the count. In 2004, with a 1-2 count, he hit .142 with a .148 on-base percentage and .412 OPS in 106 at-bats. But when he got the count to 2-1, he hit .476 with a .477 on-base percentage and 1.239 OPS in 42 at-bats. Timlin missing on the third pitch put him in a huge hole. Rodriguez’ OPS jumped to 1.528 on a 3-1 count, but back down to a .587 OPS on a 2-2 count. The next pitch was huge.

Buck said, “Timlin pitched a scoreless seventh. He’s going to have to do some work to pitch a scoreless eighth after the double by Cairo.”

Timlin threw his best pitch of the night, an 85-mph slider low and away that Rodriguez hacked at and missed. On the 2-2 pitch, Timlin fired a fastball high and tight that Rodriguez swung at and missed for strike three.

“Mike Timlin just found a hole,” Sutcliffe said. “He went up and in to get ahead in the count, and finished him off in the exact same spot.”


Obviously I could have picked a bunch of excerpts, but for the SOSH crowd, this one works.
 

ookami7m

Well-Known Member
Lifetime Member
SoSH Member
Jul 15, 2005
5,127
Mobile, AL
I’m through the end of the tenth inning of this book and I have to say that I’m definitely having flashbacks to that night. Love it so far. If you’ve not picked this up yet it’s worth it for any Red Sox fan.

Ps there’s a typo on page114 (last10 big papi post season games to 2003 ALCS not 2004 as printed.) and 117 a misspelling of detonated.
 

BaseballJones

ivanvamp
SoSH Member
Oct 1, 2015
14,838
I’m through the end of the tenth inning of this book and I have to say that I’m definitely having flashbacks to that night. Love it so far. If you’ve not picked this up yet it’s worth it for any Red Sox fan.

Ps there’s a typo on page114 (last10 big papi post season games to 2003 ALCS not 2004 as printed.) and 117 a misspelling of detonated.
Ouch okay. Well, the editors don't always catch EVERYTHING. Dammit.

Glad you're liking it though.

Also a reminder - anyone who has read it, please do me a favor and write up a short review on Amazon, even if you didn't buy it through Amazon. The review doesn't even have to be a raving positive review. If you didn't like it, that's cool too. But it would help a lot to leave a review.
 

Otis Foster

rex ryan's podiatrist
SoSH Member
Jul 18, 2005
1,613
Just ordered it.

Although I rarely comment here - most members are far more knowledgeable than I am - this just reinforces how much I love the game in general, the RS in particular and the rivalry with the Yankees that can’t be replicated anywhere else in sports. (Well, Bruins-Canadiens and Celtics-Lakers are honorable mentions.) That series stands alone in my memory and the stolen base in Game 4, when all hope seemed lost except in the RS dugout, is iconic. I can’t wait to read this and further educate myself on the intricacies of baseball strategy. I get a chill just anticipating it.
 

BaseballJones

ivanvamp
SoSH Member
Oct 1, 2015
14,838
Just ordered it.

Although I rarely comment here - most members are far more knowledgeable than I am - this just reinforces how much I love the game in general, the RS in particular and the rivalry with the Yankees that can’t be replicated anywhere else in sports. (Well, Bruins-Canadiens and Celtics-Lakers are honorable mentions.) That series stands alone in my memory and the stolen base in Game 4, when all hope seemed lost except in the RS dugout, is iconic. I can’t wait to read this and further educate myself on the intricacies of baseball strategy. I get a chill just anticipating it.
Thanks so much! It’s in the mail today! Don’t forget to leave a review on Amazon, if you wouldn’t mind. Hope you like it!
 

canyoubelieveit

Member
SoSH Member
Apr 8, 2006
7,644
Just wanted to briefly write that I have the book, and the reason I have not commented on it or written a review is that I'm saving it, as one might an old fine wine or a special cigar, for the days ahead when my favorite team has no more games to play and I need something to help me through the winter. Really looking forward to reading this in the offseason.
 

BaseballJones

ivanvamp
SoSH Member
Oct 1, 2015
14,838
Pretty cool to see your book on a real bookstore's bookshelf. This is at RJ Julia's in Madison, CT.

44639
 

aminahyaquin

Member
SoSH Member
Dec 21, 2005
599
West Virginia
Baseball Jones has published an interesting book that focuses solely on Game 5 of the 2004 ALCS. John Vampatella calls It “The Forgotten Game” and in a way he is right. Game 4 is where the comeback started but Game 5 is when the series turned after 14 innings of grueling grinding by both teams. By focusing on this one marathon contest, John reminds us how the Red Sox and Yankees fought tooth and nail until David Ortiz provided the winning blow.

As a Yankee fan, I highly recommend this book for its honest portrayal of Game 5, how close it was, and how much we have forgotten about the pivotal contest.

View: https://www.amazon.com/Forgotten-Game-2004-ALCS-Yankees/dp/1642939889/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=John+Vampatella&qid=1628885549&s=books&sr=1-1
WOW! !! WONDERFUL!!! Congrats Baseball Jones an I am adding to my AMAZON list as well
 

GBrushTWood

lurker
Jul 12, 2005
372
Brookline
Game 5 was also Pedro Martinez last start at Fenway Park in a Red Sox uniform. I always thought that was another interesting nugget about Game 5.
Much like Game 5 itself, this fact is lost over time.

It's understandable, as Pedro's last start for the Sox was World Series Game 3 in St. Louis. And his last start at Fenway...wasn't it with the Mets in 2006? I don't recall him ever pitching at Fenway with the Phillies.
 

canyoubelieveit

Member
SoSH Member
Apr 8, 2006
7,644
Just bumping this thread to say that I had this unread book ready to go in case we didn't win the Wild Card game. It was good emotional insurance to have it there. Whenever this wonderful season comes to an end and I get those "Green Fields of the Mind" sorts of feelings, I'll know this little gift will be here waiting.
 

BaseballJones

ivanvamp
SoSH Member
Oct 1, 2015
14,838
Just bumping this thread to say that I had this unread book ready to go in case we didn't win the Wild Card game. It was good emotional insurance to have it there. Whenever this wonderful season comes to an end and I get those "Green Fields of the Mind" sorts of feelings, I'll know this little gift will be here waiting.
Well then, let’s hope you don’t open it for a while!!
 

mauidano

Mai Tais for everyone!
SoSH Member
Aug 21, 2006
31,454
Maui
@BaseballJones Would love to buy this book! Would rather buy it in a way that benefits you directly and not Amazon etc. Can you do autographed copes directly via Venmo or PayPal?

We need to support our SoSH authors!
 

soPhisHticated

Well-Known Member
Lifetime Member
SoSH Member
I was at this game with my wife. Aside from the action on the field, there were two things I remember vividly:

The first was staying up the night before to watch the Roberts game - not knowing if there was even going to be a baseball game... in about 16 hours. Was hard to feel optimistic about our chances even if they pulled off Game 4.

The Yankees fans that were sitting directly behind us. What you'd expect: loud, obnoxious, "nine-teen-eight-teen" for five hours non-stop. The best part was when I turned around to give them shit when Papi hit the game winner, and those bastards disappeared like ghosts before the ball landed.

@BaseballJones : I just bought two signed copies from your site. Can't wait to read this.
 

Ale Xander

killed off Vin Scully
SoSH Member
Oct 31, 2013
43,714
Are you going to write another one about yesterday?

maybe a new chapter inthe second edition?
 

jaytftwofive

lurker
Jan 20, 2013
987
Drexel Hill Pa.
Baseball Jones has published an interesting book that focuses solely on Game 5 of the 2004 ALCS. John Vampatella calls It “The Forgotten Game” and in a way he is right. Game 4 is where the comeback started but Game 5 is when the series turned after 14 innings of grueling grinding by both teams. By focusing on this one marathon contest, John reminds us how the Red Sox and Yankees fought tooth and nail until David Ortiz provided the winning blow.

As a Yankee fan, I highly recommend this book for its honest portrayal of Game 5, how close it was, and how much we have forgotten about the pivotal contest.

View: https://www.amazon.com/Forgotten-Game-2004-ALCS-Yankees/dp/1642939889/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=John+Vampatella&qid=1628885549&s=books&sr=1-1
Forgotten???? Hardly, I don't why he would call it that. I'll have to read the book I guess.
 

jaytftwofive

lurker
Jan 20, 2013
987
Drexel Hill Pa.
I don't think any of us diehard Sox fans will forget it but it's certainly not in the same general population lore as Game 4 (Roberts steal), Game 6 (Schilling bloody sock) or Game 7 (finally slaying the beast).
I rank it right there with those moments. Clarks ground rule double is what probably turned it all around. That ball goes less then a foot shorter, Sierra scores and maybe Yanks win series. And maybe Torre having Jeter bunt instead of swing away. Maybe that was game 4 but I think it was Game 5 top of the 8th. And Joe Buck had a great line........"Damon coming around third.......and he can keep on running till New York! Game Six tomorrow night"
 
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terrynever

Member
SoSH Member
Aug 25, 2005
20,883
pawtucket
I rank it right there with those moments. Clarks ground rule double is what probably turned it all around. That ball goes less then a foot shorter, Sheffield scores and maybe Yanks win series. And maybe Torre having Jeter bunt instead of swing away. Maybe that was game 4 but I think it was Game 5 top of the 8th.
Buy the book. BaseballJones wrote it because he felt that game gets overlooked. It happens. Last night was memorable but tonight could be historic, for one side or the other
 

BaseballJones

ivanvamp
SoSH Member
Oct 1, 2015
14,838
I rank it right there with those moments. Clarks ground rule double is what probably turned it all around. That ball goes less then a foot shorter, Sheffield scores and maybe Yanks win series. And maybe Torre having Jeter bunt instead of swing away. Maybe that was game 4 but I think it was Game 5 top of the 8th. And Joe Buck had a great line........"Damon coming around third.......and he can keep on running till New York! Game Six tomorrow night"
Close. It was Sierra on first when Clark hit the automatic double that actually saved the Sox a run. And Jeter actually bunted in the 8th so the question is: what would have happened if they’d have let him swing away?
 

jaytftwofive

lurker
Jan 20, 2013
987
Drexel Hill Pa.
Buy the book. BaseballJones wrote it because he felt that game gets overlooked. It happens. Last night was memorable but tonight could be historic, for one side or the other
OK I think I will. I don't know if you heard of a book called "Day of light and shadows" by Jonathan Schwartz. A painful lol, but very good short book about the 1978 one game playoff between the Red Sox and Yanks.
 

jaytftwofive

lurker
Jan 20, 2013
987
Drexel Hill Pa.
Close. It was Sierra on first when Clark hit the automatic double that actually saved the Sox a run. And Jeter actually bunted in the 8th so the question is: what would have happened if they’d have let him swing away?
Sorry it was Sierra. Buck and McCarver questioned having a good hitter like Jeter bunting because he was also a good opposite field hitter. Cairo doubled and was sacrificed to third by Jeter. A-Rod struck out, Sheffield walked. Foulke came in to replace Timlin and got Matsui to fly to left. End of inning. I just remember them kind of questioning that bunt. As it turns out, we lucked out.
 

BaseballJones

ivanvamp
SoSH Member
Oct 1, 2015
14,838
Sorry it was Sierra. Buck and McCarver questioned having a good hitter like Jeter bunting because he was also a good opposite field hitter. Cairo doubled and was sacrificed to third by Jeter. A-Rod struck out, Sheffield walked. Foulke came in to replace Timlin and got Matsui to fly to left. End of inning. I just remember them kind of questioning that bunt. As it turns out, we lucked out.
The key was ARod’s K. He just needed a fly ball. Nope.

I actually get into the whole bunt/no bunt strategy question in that inning.
 

Jim Ed Rice in HOF

Red-headed Skrub child
SoSH Member
Jul 21, 2005
5,576
Seacoast NH
The Yankees fans that were sitting directly behind us. What you'd expect: loud, obnoxious, "nine-teen-eight-teen" for five hours non-stop. The best part was when I turned around to give them shit when Papi hit the game winner, and those bastards disappeared like ghosts before the ball landed.
This was one of my off the field favorite memories from game 4. Yankee fans in the section next to us (they were in 37, I'm in 36) after the bottom of the 8th were very loud and obnoxious to the point it was going to get physical with those around them very soon. Security came up and the Sox fans were basically telling security and the cops that if the Yankee fans didn't STFU there was going to be an issue. Security gave the Yankee fans an option of either quieting down or they'd have to leave the section. They wouldn't, they were escorted out. No idea if they had to leave the park or just the section but I hope they got to watch Mariano implode somewhere.
 

canyoubelieveit

Member
SoSH Member
Apr 8, 2006
7,644
Just bumping this thread to say that I had this unread book ready to go in case we didn't win the Wild Card ALDS. It was good emotional insurance to have it there. Whenever this wonderful season comes to an end and I get those "Green Fields of the Mind" sorts of feelings, I'll know this little gift will be here waiting.
 

BaseballJones

ivanvamp
SoSH Member
Oct 1, 2015
14,838
Just bumping this thread to say that I had this unread book ready to go in case we didn't win the Wild Card ALDS. It was good emotional insurance to have it there. Whenever this wonderful season comes to an end and I get those "Green Fields of the Mind" sorts of feelings, I'll know this little gift will be here waiting.
I hope you have to wait a while....
 

BaseballJones

ivanvamp
SoSH Member
Oct 1, 2015
14,838
Just bumping this thread to say that I had this unread book ready to go in case we didn't win the Wild Card ALDS. It was good emotional insurance to have it there. Whenever this wonderful season comes to an end and I get those "Green Fields of the Mind" sorts of feelings, I'll know this little gift will be here waiting.
Well....here we are.
 

canyoubelieveit

Member
SoSH Member
Apr 8, 2006
7,644
Well....here we are.
Yes indeed, was deciding on the right time to come back here and post once more. I'm still riding the high of a great Sox season, and I happen to live in Atlanta so I can convince myself that I still have meaningful baseball to root for (even though I don't approve of the Tomahawk Chop). I suspect the right time to "break glass in case of emergency" to read this book will be a few weeks after the baseball season has ended (maybe sooner) when my heart aches for baseball and the days until spring training seem impossibly long.
 

BaseballJones

ivanvamp
SoSH Member
Oct 1, 2015
14,838
Just bought this from your site as a gift to my 18 year old baseball obsessed son! At least one person in the house will read it.
Awesome, thank you very much! Will be in the mail tomorrow! I hope you enjoy it. Please, when you're done, leave a review on the book's Amazon page. Reviews are important!
 

GB5

lurker
Aug 26, 2013
169
Mike & the Mad Dog came on the afternoon after Game 7 and were fantastic. It’s on YouTube. Great radio. Anyways, they both agreed that when looking back at the series, they think the biggest at bat that was not recognized was AROD striking out against Timlin in the 8th of game 5. Sac fly there and they go up 3 with 6 outs to go the inning after Manny’s disheartening 6-4-3, DP. They both believe that if AROD gets that run in its curtains for the Sox and I am not sure if I disagree.

additionally I have never seen a pitchers stuff move as much as Loiza’s was that night. He was simply unhittable. Posada was fighting every pitch. I don’t recall him pitching any other time in the series, and I don’t recall him pitching much for the Yanks down the stretch. How could his stuff be that electric and he is otherwise off the map.
Anybody know what became of him after 04?
 

CaptainLaddie

dj paul pfieffer
SoSH Member
Sep 6, 2004
31,969
the district
Mike & the Mad Dog came on the afternoon after Game 7 and were fantastic. It’s on YouTube. Great radio. Anyways, they both agreed that when looking back at the series, they think the biggest at bat that was not recognized was AROD striking out against Timlin in the 8th of game 5. Sac fly there and they go up 3 with 6 outs to go the inning after Manny’s disheartening 6-4-3, DP. They both believe that if AROD gets that run in its curtains for the Sox and I am not sure if I disagree.

additionally I have never seen a pitchers stuff move as much as Loiza’s was that night. He was simply unhittable. Posada was fighting every pitch. I don’t recall him pitching any other time in the series, and I don’t recall him pitching much for the Yanks down the stretch. How could his stuff be that electric and he is otherwise off the map.
Anybody know what became of him after 04?
He'll be getting out of prison early next year.
 

RG33

Potty Mouth
Gold Supporter
SoSH Member
Nov 28, 2005
5,224
CA
Just purchased as a stocking stuffer for myself. I caught the highlights of this game on the Ken Burns documentary randomly the other night and it brought back great memories — and lots of anxiety! Looking forward to reading it and will be sure to leave a review on Amazon!

With that said — there’s a LOT of folks who have bought the book in this thread and ONLY 7 reviews on Amazon. Help the guy out for chrissakes!
 

BaseballJones

ivanvamp
SoSH Member
Oct 1, 2015
14,838
Just purchased as a stocking stuffer for myself. I caught the highlights of this game on the Ken Burns documentary randomly the other night and it brought back great memories — and lots of anxiety! Looking forward to reading it and will be sure to leave a review on Amazon!

With that said — there’s a LOT of folks who have bought the book in this thread and ONLY 7 reviews on Amazon. Help the guy out for chrissakes!
Thank you so much!
 

CapeCodYaz

lurker
Sep 24, 2020
30
Just finished this most excellent book! You forget how close it was in game 5 and really most of that Yankees series. Just a great time back then watching with die hard Sox fans--so many good memories!
 

BaseballJones

ivanvamp
SoSH Member
Oct 1, 2015
14,838
Just finished this most excellent book! You forget how close it was in game 5 and really most of that Yankees series. Just a great time back then watching with die hard Sox fans--so many good memories!
Awesome, thanks!! If you wouldn’t mind posting a review on Amazon, I’d really appreciate it.