Ryan Brasier retweets video mocking Jacob Blake response

DennyDoyle'sBoil

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Trading one or both of them just feels wrong to me. The Red Sox would actually get something of value out of removing these two assholes from the team and they also get to avoid dealing with it publicly in a way that shows they want to lead on this issue instead of BLM just happening around them. And the two players get to go play for a team a whole lot better than the Sox and avoid any kind of accountability for their actions. And I would assume if they are traded it won't be accompanied by any kind of statement repudiating both guys because that's sort of a slap in the face to the organization trading for them. I'd rather have them just both be released.
This is a legitimate take. I don't feel this way. I'm not sure if I should but to me I don't need for them to be punished. I just want them wearing different laundry. Maybe that's the easy take and yours is the right one.

You can't avoid having players who feel the way these guys do. We probably have others already on the team. To me what needs to be addressed is that they spoke out in a way that perpetuates hurt and so they need to be gone. But being gone is enough for me.
 

chrisfont9

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I don't agree with what he did, but is there going to be a test of beliefs for every player? Is there a pureness score they will need to reach to stay employed?
Baseball has to walk a fine line with politics, given the vast number of white country boys who think a lot like Brasier. Obviously not news, but the sensitivity is at an all time high now. I'm sure the Sox aren't the only team dealing with trumpy nonsense that offends their non-white players.
 

Ralphwiggum

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This is a legitimate take. I don't feel this way. I'm not sure if I should but to me I don't need for them to be punished. I just want them wearing different laundry. Maybe that's the easy take and yours is the right one.

You can't avoid having players who feel the way these guys do. We probably have others already on the team. To me what needs to be addressed is that they spoke out in a way that perpetuates hurt and so they need to be gone. But being gone is enough for me.
I hear you. I mostly just want them off the team too but I'd like for there to be some indication that the Red Sox learned something from this and I'm not sure a trade by itself does that for me. I don't really care that much about either guy being punished. If someone is wiling to trade for them then someone would be willing to pick them up if they were released so there isn't going to be any kind of long-term damage done to either guy's career (I don't think). I just like the message of being able to release them and then put out a statement that there's no room on the team for guys who will do shit like that.
 

edoug

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This is a legitimate take. I don't feel this way. I'm not sure if I should but to me I don't need for them to be punished. I just want them wearing different laundry. Maybe that's the easy take and yours is the right one.

You can't avoid having players who feel the way these guys do. We probably have others already on the team. To me what needs to be addressed is that they spoke out in a way that perpetuates hurt and so they need to be gone. But being gone is enough for me.
This is the way I feel as well.
.
 

richgedman'sghost

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I'm pretty much at the point that I suspect you're a shitty human being if you're white and a MLB player. Rotten apples and all.....
So Cal Ripken, Mitch Moreland, Dwight Evans Brock Holt etc are ALL shitty human beings? Good to know... You are almost as bad as racists who call African Americans awful things.
I don't want to really compare you to them (they are much worse) but you have a gross generalization. I realize you are frustrated and I would be too but we need to come together not promote language which divides us. If you truly believe every single white player is a racist and shitty human being, j don't know what to tell you. Do you think every single NBA player is a fantastic human? Please don't deal with gross generalizations.
 
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Sandy Leon Trotsky

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So Cal Ripken, Mitch Moreland, Dwight Evans Brock Holt etc are ALL shitty human beings? Good to know... You are almost as bad as racists who call African Americans awful things.
I don't want to really compare you to them (they are much worse) but you have a gross generalization. I realize you are frustrated and I would be too but we need to come together not promote language which divides us. If you truly believe every single white player is a racist and shitty human being, j don't know what to tell you. Do you think every single NBA player is a fantastic human? Please don't deal with gross generalizations.
Listen.... I said "I'm pretty much at the point that I suspect...." I would expect that you'd be able to read the differences there than saying "....are ALL shitty human beings". I guess I was incorrect. Let me restate...."I know that not all white MLB baseball players are shitty human beings- there's lots of exceptions... but there really seems to be a whole bunch that are overt racists, and their actions are tarnishing the ones that aren't.... although I have not heard much very deliberate support of BLM from white MLB players and it raises my suspicion even more." Is that better? And should I draw some diagrams to show you that this doesn't apply in the reverse to black MLB players, nor players from other sports?
Yes this is getting frustrating (understatement) and I'm dragging a lot of my own familial bullshit into this... but I really haven't seen any overt support of BLM from white MLB players. Players taking a knee is about as "showing solidarity" as when the cops did it back in June. It's an empty gesture. Similar to "apologies if I may have hurt anyone's feelings"
 

dynomite

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I hear you. I mostly just want them off the team too but I'd like for there to be some indication that the Red Sox learned something from this and I'm not sure a trade by itself does that for me. I don't really care that much about either guy being punished. If someone is wiling to trade for them then someone would be willing to pick them up if they were released so there isn't going to be any kind of long-term damage done to either guy's career (I don't think).
Exactly right. It’s the central thesis of Dr. Ibram Kendi’s — newly installed as the head of a new Center in this field at BU — landmark book “How to Be An Antiracist.” His whole point is that typically white people try to cover their passivity in response to racism by saying merely “Well, I’m not racist.” This is in effect what the Red Sox are doing with Brasier. “Well, he’s sorry, and he’s not racist.” Dr. Kendi powerfully responds: that’s not good enough.

Denial is the heartbeat of racism, beating across ideologies, races and nations. It is beating within us. Many of us who strongly call out [President] Trump’s racist ideas will strongly deny our own. How often do we become reflexively defensive when someone calls something we’ve done or said racist? How many of us would agree with this statement: “‘Racist’ isn’t a descriptive word. It’s a pejorative word. It is the equivalent of saying, ‘I don’t like you.’” Those are actually the words of White supremacist Richard Spencer, who, like Trump, identifies as “not racist.” How many of us who despise the Trumps and White supremacists of the world share their self-definition of “not racist”?

What’s the problem with being “not racist”? It is a claim that signifies neutrality: “I am not a racist, but neither am I aggressively against racism.” But there is no neutrality in the racism struggle. The opposite of “racist” isn’t “not racist.” It is “antiracist.” What’s the difference? One endorses the idea of a racial hierarchy as a racist or racial equality as an antiracist. One either believes problems are rooted in groups of people, as a racist, or locates the roots of problems in power and policies, as an antiracist. One either allows racial inequities to persevere, as a racist, or confronts racial inequities, as an antiracist. There is no in between space of “not racist.” The claim of “not racist" neutrality is a mask for racism.
Now, fine, some will say they want their baseball team to stay neutral, that the Red Sox should stay out of this fray and don’t have an obligation to be antiracist — their obligation, in other words, is just to shut up and play.

I disagree. People are dying. Black Americans are crying out for change and allies. And being silent about these things at this inflection point of pain and possibility is tantamount to condoning the quiet racism that has led us to this moment.

A good interview — where I pulled the quotes from — is here:https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.washingtonpost.com/education/2019/09/30/we-know-how-be-racist-we-know-how-pretend-be-not-racist-now-lets-know-how-be-antiracist/?outputType=amp
 

reggiecleveland

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Having travelled to the USA with young people playing both basketball and baseball, I was really shocked with the divide on attitudes towards race in the two worlds. Obviously at the best tournaments the % of white kids is reversed in each sport. In hoops a big change was in the early 90s most of the coaches, even at youth AAU were white, recently the coaches seem to reflect the makeup of the teams. In baseball, the nonwhite players were mostly Latin kids, and while there were some really good teams from Arizona, SouCal with mostly Latin kids and Latin coaches, it is rare.But, generally it was time-warp. The same comments, by parents coaches that, were at times heard in hoops decades ago, still linger in baseball, parents not sitting together, etc.Same code phrases, "play the game the right way" "all about the flashy play rather than the good play" cringy stuff like 'Put some salsa on it Carlos!"etc were thrown around by white parents and coaches. Some coaches I spoke with said % of black kids has dropped and mentioned MLB at one time funded inner city baseball programs that got black kids started.

My point is attitudes like Pilar's and Brasier's are probably more popular in MLB than we think, since growing up, coming up most of the teams, parents coaches are white, more white than 25 years ago.
 

Mueller's Twin Grannies

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Brasier's on a one-year deal and we're not exactly in the hunt, what's the reasoning to keep him on the team if Bloom doesn't trade him today?
He has a functioning pitching arm and isn't someone they want to protect for the future?

I think he should be gone but whomever said have him pitch until his arm falls off... that's not the worst case scenario either. Squeeze him dry then send him packing once the playoffs start. If he pitches well, he'll get a look from someone else next season. If he gets shelled, it'll probably be the end of his tenure in the big leagues. Cutting him allows for another team to pick him up while the Sox foot the bill and get nothing in return other than, maybe, an uptick in locker room harmony. It's addition by subtraction either way, but since most of the guys in the locker room who aren't signed long-term aren't likely to be major cogs next year, I'm not sure that better locker room harmony really matters in the short term. So if they aren't going to cut him (which, again, they should, but I can see the business reasons not to), just run him into the ground and change horses when needed.

They could always still cut him in the last week of the season or as soon as he is no longer eligible to be added to a playoff roster (I'm assuming there's a deadline and it may be as soon as tomorrow) or once the field is pretty much set so he can't be of any real use to anyone contending and won't even get to play in the postseason.

Some things are more punishing than a release. I'd be all for a more creative solution to end his time as a Boston Red Sox.
 

Ralphwiggum

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I know Twitter isn't the real world, but if you look at comments related to the Pillar trade it's all baseball related stuff, and pretty much nobody making the connection between his comments and the trade (if there even is one to make, with Brasier still hanging around it's fair to wonder whether the Pillar move was strictly a baseball move). Anyway, this is exactly what I was worried about. We don't have to see his pathetic ass in a Sox uniform anymore, but he makes out by getting traded to a better team and the Sox lose an opportunity to lead on this issue.
 

Doooweeeey!

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Exactly right. It’s the central thesis of Dr. Ibram Kendi’s — newly installed as the head of a new Center in this field at BU — landmark book “How to Be An Antiracist.” His whole point is that typically white people try to cover their passivity in response to racism by saying merely “Well, I’m not racist.” This is in effect what the Red Sox are doing with Brasier. “Well, he’s sorry, and he’s not racist.” Dr. Kendi powerfully responds: that’s not good enough.



Now, fine, some will say they want their baseball team to stay neutral, that the Red Sox should stay out of this fray and don’t have an obligation to be antiracist — their obligation, in other words, is just to shut up and play.

I disagree. People are dying. Black Americans are crying out for change and allies. And being silent about these things at this inflection point of pain and possibility is tantamount to condoning the quiet racism that has led us to this moment.

A good interview — where I pulled the quotes from — is here:https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.washingtonpost.com/education/2019/09/30/we-know-how-be-racist-we-know-how-pretend-be-not-racist-now-lets-know-how-be-antiracist/?outputType=amp
Good post. Thanks.
Working on becoming an anti-racist organization is the harder road...but it's the right one.
MLB doesn't give up a day or two to Jackie Robinson's legacy for passive covering or for show.

The Red Sox can and should use their leverage with Brasier, whether it be trade, re-assignment of playing time or role.
Brasier needs the job more than they need him, although it's close if all one cares about is the roster.
Hopefully everyone will learn from this.
 

richgedman'sghost

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I know Twitter isn't the real world, but if you look at comments related to the Pillar trade it's all baseball related stuff, and pretty much nobody making the connection between his comments and the trade (if there even is one to make, with Brasier still hanging around it's fair to wonder whether the Pillar move was strictly a baseball move). Anyway, this is exactly what I was worried about. We don't have to see his pathetic ass in a Sox uniform anymore, but he makes out by getting traded to a better team and the Sox lose an opportunity to lead on this issue.
Two points...Is Colorado really a better baseball team than the Red Sox at the moment? Granted they might have a slightly better record than the Sox but they are no lock for the playoffs. Plus I'm happy that Pillar got traded to the NL West so I don't have to see most of his games anymore.
Secondly, as you said most of the talk about the Pillar trade on twitter has been strictly on field baseball related. Honestly, how many general baseball fans really heard Pillar's recent comments? With all that has happened in baseball the past week, I did not think his comments were widely publicized. Outside Boston, I'm not sure the remarks were covered. The comments were less offensive than the homophobic slurs Pillar used a few years ago. In fact, I'd ALMOST give Pillar a pass for his recent comments and dismiss them as simply an inarticulate response if not for the previous remarks. Certainly Pillar's comments were less of a problem than Brasier's but I'm not crying that Pillar is gone.
As for Brasier, isn't pitching for the 2020 Sox punishment enough? Again, I wonder how much his comments affected his trade value? Were other teams really worried about adding a player with Braiser's attitude and decorum to the clubhouse chemistry? Was Tilt's actions widely publicized? I'm just surprised that we couldn't even get a low A prospect for him. I think he is under contract for one more year past this one if I'm not mistaken.
 

richgedman'sghost

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Two points...Is Colorado really a better baseball team than the Red Sox at the moment? Granted they might have a slightly better record than the Sox but they are no lock for the playoffs. Plus I'm happy that Pillar got traded to the NL West so I don't have to see most of his games anymore.
Secondly, as you said most of the talk about the Pillar trade on twitter has been strictly on field baseball related. Honestly, how many general baseball fans really heard Pillar's recent comments? With all that has happened in baseball the past week, I did not think his comments were widely publicized. Outside Boston, I'm not sure the remarks were covered. The comments were less offensive than the homophobic slurs Pillar used a few years ago. In fact, I'd ALMOST give Pillar a pass for his recent comments and dismiss them as simply an inarticulate response if not for the previous remarks. Certainly Pillar's comments were less of a problem than Brasier's but I'm not crying that Pillar is gone.
As for Brasier, isn't pitching for the 2020 Sox punishment enough? Again, I wonder how much his comments affected his trade value? Were other teams really worried about adding a player with Braiser's attitude and decorum to the clubhouse chemistry? Was Tilt's actions widely publicized? I'm just surprised that we couldn't even get a low A prospect for him. I think he is under contract for one more year past this one if I'm not mistaken.
I'm actually more disappointed so far with the Red Sox organization as a whole than with the players themselves. The Red Sox had a chance to make a real forward thinking statement or action. Instead they took a milktoast response. I expect more from the organization. You will always have a few yahoos and sinners on the team. Not every player will be a Saint but if a player does violate the public trust, you'd expect the organization to respond in a proper manner
This might be a crazy idea but I wonder if Big Papi was still around what the Sox response would have been. I mean he's still around but not in the clubhouse every day.
 

DennyDoyle'sBoil

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There may have not been anything proving or disproving your point, but posts have been removed from this thread. Best of luck, Winston Smith!
No posts that were moved to backwash in any way suggested that we should get rid of Brasier because of his beliefs.
 

absintheofmalaise

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There may have not been anything proving or disproving your point, but posts have been removed from this thread. Best of luck, Winston Smith!
Posts in this thread have been moved to their own thread in Backwash where they belong. No member's voice is being censored. Accusing us, me specifically because I broke the posts out, of that is total bullshit and you know it. And that was also your last mistake.
 

mwonow

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Two points...Is Colorado really a better baseball team than the Red Sox at the moment? Granted they might have a slightly better record than the Sox but they are no lock for the playoffs. Plus I'm happy that Pillar got traded to the NL West so I don't have to see most of his games anymore.
Secondly, as you said most of the talk about the Pillar trade on twitter has been strictly on field baseball related. Honestly, how many general baseball fans really heard Pillar's recent comments? With all that has happened in baseball the past week, I did not think his comments were widely publicized. Outside Boston, I'm not sure the remarks were covered. The comments were less offensive than the homophobic slurs Pillar used a few years ago. In fact, I'd ALMOST give Pillar a pass for his recent comments and dismiss them as simply an inarticulate response if not for the previous remarks. Certainly Pillar's comments were less of a problem than Brasier's but I'm not crying that Pillar is gone.
As for Brasier, isn't pitching for the 2020 Sox punishment enough? Again, I wonder how much his comments affected his trade value? Were other teams really worried about adding a player with Braiser's attitude and decorum to the clubhouse chemistry? Was Tilt's actions widely publicized? I'm just surprised that we couldn't even get a low A prospect for him. I think he is under contract for one more year past this one if I'm not mistaken.
They were news/subject of some public discussion in Toronto. Of the 'I'm so glad that asshole doesn't play for *my* team any more' variety.
 

scottyno

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Brasier's on a one-year deal and we're not exactly in the hunt, what's the reasoning to keep him on the team if Bloom doesn't trade him today?
He has 3 years of team control left, he's not on a one year deal any more than devers is.
 

Bertha

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As a white dad of a black 9-year-old boy, the increasing racial divide in this country both exhausts me and horrifies me. My single most important role in life is to protect my son. The fact that so many like Brasier exist within our society has been a mild shock to me over the past 5 years. The fact that so many feel it is OK to publicly express extreme and evil thoughts seemed so unlikely to me, until 5 years ago.

I have always been a proponent that all groups who are discriminated against need the support of the straight, white, male “majority”, in order to be accepted, treated with dignity, and be considered equally as valuable as the assholes who rule society. I have reached a point where I am ashamed to be a straight, white male.

I have been a lifelong Red Sox fan, assigned at birth. It has been a huge part of my identity. It may be DVR, but I watch almost every game. Fenway park has been a special place in my life since my earliest memories. I have read this site daily for almost 20 years, as a source of so much great info, including minor leagues and prospects.

This feels like the last straw for me. Not just Brasier. Pillar seems even worse to me, simply due to him having publicly been called out for his
Bigotry in the past. In may of 2017, Toronto suspended him for 2 games for using an anti-gay slur toward an opposing player. He apologized at the time, but that seems fairly empty in light of current statements.
The fact that a wealthy white male feels no need to “uplift” any particular subset of society shows his true colors. His demographic already has all the advantages and perks of being that of the ruling class.

I am sympathetic to the quandary the Red Sox face in terms of PR, but feel the only correct outcome is to have immediately released both of them. I cannot support them any longer unless stronger action is taken. This will hurt me more than it hurts Sox management, but if enough people force it, positive change can occur.

I remain hopeful for true and lasting changes in our society, and would love to see the Sox be part of that movement. On the other side, I am so proud to be an NBA fan right now, particularly a Celtics fan, and a huge Jaylen Brown fan. I talk with my Son often about Jaylen being a very good basketball player, and an even better human being.

Quoting myself here for context. I let this percolate for a while in my subconscious, and sent the following letter to the Red Sox this morning.

Dear Boston Red Sox,

I write this with hope of encouraging the entire organization to use its power, forum, financial position, and collective voice, to commit to being leaders and a force for social justice and true equality for all humans.

Some background on me - Being a Red Sox fan is one of my defining traits. It was assigned at birth by my Mom and Uncle, who immigrated from Europe as young children in the late 1930s. Their quickly-found love for the Sox was a huge part of their assimilation into becoming US residents and New Englanders. A move to NY in the 1960s meant my siblings and I grew up in the heart of Yankee territory. Our family was raised with stories of Ted Williams, Johnny Pesky, Dom DiMaggio, Bobby Doerr, and others. Frequent trips to Fenway Park are some of my most cherished and memorable childhood (and adult) moments. Like so many others, I have lived and died with each game, including all those years of not winning it all, so much heartbreak. In spite of the mocking of my NY Yankee fan friends and neighbors, I remained a truly loyal sox fan throughout the decades. The 2004 championship had an incredibly cathartic effect on me, far more than a non-Sox fan could ever understand. A huge moment in my life was my participation, with many family members, in Run to Home Base. The sad necessity to care for emotional wounds of so many soldiers made it an incredibly emotional experience for us all. The personal experience of finishing the run by emerging into Center Field and setting foot on the hallowed ground of Fenway Park was overwhelming. Following the LF warning track, touching the green monster, crossing home plate, soaking up so much history, conflicting emotions, memories, joys and sorrows, was a once-in-a-lifetime experience.

The recent social media post by Ryan Brasier, and follow-up quotes from Kevin Pillar have caused me to reassess my support of the franchise. I believe strongly in freedom of speech and expression of personal views, but have no tolerance for hurtful and hateful behavior. I am not so naïve to think that all professional athletes share my beliefs regarding equality, and the injustices that so many humans face daily. However, I am not tolerant of a person in a public position mocking the pain suffered by so many of their fellow human beings.

I am extremely disappointed at the lukewarm response by the Red Sox. I am far from naïve in the ways of business, as well as competitive sports. That said, I believe the correct response would have been immediately release or DFA of both players. Pillar is equally wrong in his hurtful comments. After his signing, I recalled his anti-gay slurs from a few years back. As he was signed partially for “veteran leadership” I could only hope that was a one-off, and he had grown, evolved, and learned since them. Sadly, when someone shows you who they are, it is usually best to believe them.

These two quotes from Boston Globe article of 08/29/2020 seem perfunctory at best.

“You bring any group of this many people together, you’re bound to have people with different views and different thoughts,” said Bloom. “Peaceful protests are about changing minds. If we can’t look at progress that gets made towards a goal in a room of people with very different opinions — if we can’t look at that and see progress, then we’re undermining our own goals.”

“We don’t demand that everyone have the same political opinion,” added Sox CEO Sam Kennedy.

And from Masslive article of 08/31/2020

“I know there have been some negative things said the last few days about comments that he made,” Roenicke said. “If people want to get on him for the way he plays or something like that, okay, but nobody should ever question what type of guy this is. This is a really good person. He’s a great teammate. He was a great leader for these guys. I felt bad for him because it really bothered him, the comments that were made.

Is he truly a great teammate for all? Perhaps on the field he showed leadership and solidarity. How about in the clubhouse? How would a gay teammate feel about Pillar’s leadership? As in so many cases, Roenicke’s statement reflects views only from his perspective as a white, privileged male.

I agree with Sam Kennedy. We cannot expect or demand the same political opinions from all members of any organization. We should, however, expect decency, empathy, consideration of the feelings of teammate’s and fans, and recognition of others suffering where so many of us are privileged to the point of not even realizing it. The Red Sox response was simply weak PR and an attempt to offend the least amount of people possible.

We have reached the point where I must use the age-old parental line – “This is going to hurt me more than you”. I can no longer support the Red Sox unless and until the organization makes a STRONG stand for social justice, for fighting systemic racism, and showing outward and inward support for all people who are treated differently for their appearance, belief, sexuality, religion, and more.

I typically watch over 150 Sox games per year. For the first time in over 50 years, I am no longer watching games. I currently have no intentions of ever returning to Fenway Park. This will not even cause a blip on your balance sheet, but will have a significant effect on my daily life. In my mind, there are two seasons of the year – baseball season and the rest of the year.

In contrast, recent days have increased my pride and joy in being a fan of the Boston Celtics and the NBA. The words and actions of so many of their members remind me of our humanity and strength, and give me hope and encouragement. From the young Jaylen Brown to the venerated and wise elder statesman Bill Russell, these people are speaking and acting, at the risk of personal loss. They are demonstrating leadership rather than hiding behind platitudes.

There is no simple roadmap for how to solve the inequities faced by so many. Like much of your management group, I, too, am a white middle-aged male. We simply cannot put ourselves in the shoes of people who face fear daily of being mistreated, physically abused, verbally abused, assaulted, and yes, even murdered. We cannot recognize how many more opportunities many of us have that others do not; economic, educational, career, housing, so many aspects of life we take for granted are not that way for all. What each of us can do is fight for recognition of all the injustice in this country and this world. We can use our positions to speak the truth, not tired memes that justify hatefulness. We can use our wealth to sponsor programs that address injustices. We can publicly proclaim our support that BLACK LIVES MATTER. The fact we even need to say this brings me incredible sadness. We can educate, do more to encourage and enable voter turnout, address the enormous disparity in quality and financial support for education in predominantly poor communities, with high percentages of people of color. Sadly, the list is endless.

Boston Red Sox, the organization I have loved my entire life, please be bold, be willing to speak up for all, be willing to risk alienating some, be leaders in the community, the country, and the world. You have the means and the voice. Please do all in your power to work toward justice for all.

I ask these things for reasons both global and personal.

Globally, the world needs more people in positions of power to lead us all toward a more just environment. Those not being discriminated against must be part of the solution in support of every group that is oppressed. Those in positions of privilege and power must lead us toward a world where every person can live with dignify and in safety.

Personally, my selfish desire is to have reason to not lose one of my lifelong joys, being a Red Sox fan.

Thank you for reading this letter.
 

Lose Remerswaal

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Really good, Bertha.

As a long time volunteer with the Red Sox Foundation, the Run to Home Base was always my favorite event. I would get to Fenway before dawn (eerie that early) and for the first three years of the event I was one of the timers at the finish line, welcoming the runners across. Then when the “racers” were done, I’d help hand out water to the finishers while they waited to cross home plate. I’d see hundreds of competitors trying to take selfies against the Monster, and I offered to take “real” pics of each of them. Everyone, especially the active service members, was so grateful to me for doing that. To me. A guy standing there taking pictures of people who just ran 9K, while I stood there pushing buttons. Thanking me, a guy standing there taking pictures of people who have volunteered to put their lives on the line for me and my country. Makes me misty eyed thinking about these heroes thanking me for doing pretty much nothing. I always turned it around and let them know they were the real heroes, not me.

i sent the Foundation an email about Brasier and Pillar when the foundation was pushing Jackie Robinson Day and suggested they needed to stand behind their support with action. I heard nothing back. I hope you get a better response from them than I did.
 

Ralphwiggum

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Quoting myself here for context. I let this percolate for a while in my subconscious, and sent the following letter to the Red Sox this morning.

Dear Boston Red Sox,

I write this with hope of encouraging the entire organization to use its power, forum, financial position, and collective voice, to commit to being leaders and a force for social justice and true equality for all humans.

Some background on me - Being a Red Sox fan is one of my defining traits. It was assigned at birth by my Mom and Uncle, who immigrated from Europe as young children in the late 1930s. Their quickly-found love for the Sox was a huge part of their assimilation into becoming US residents and New Englanders. A move to NY in the 1960s meant my siblings and I grew up in the heart of Yankee territory. Our family was raised with stories of Ted Williams, Johnny Pesky, Dom DiMaggio, Bobby Doerr, and others. Frequent trips to Fenway Park are some of my most cherished and memorable childhood (and adult) moments. Like so many others, I have lived and died with each game, including all those years of not winning it all, so much heartbreak. In spite of the mocking of my NY Yankee fan friends and neighbors, I remained a truly loyal sox fan throughout the decades. The 2004 championship had an incredibly cathartic effect on me, far more than a non-Sox fan could ever understand. A huge moment in my life was my participation, with many family members, in Run to Home Base. The sad necessity to care for emotional wounds of so many soldiers made it an incredibly emotional experience for us all. The personal experience of finishing the run by emerging into Center Field and setting foot on the hallowed ground of Fenway Park was overwhelming. Following the LF warning track, touching the green monster, crossing home plate, soaking up so much history, conflicting emotions, memories, joys and sorrows, was a once-in-a-lifetime experience.

The recent social media post by Ryan Brasier, and follow-up quotes from Kevin Pillar have caused me to reassess my support of the franchise. I believe strongly in freedom of speech and expression of personal views, but have no tolerance for hurtful and hateful behavior. I am not so naïve to think that all professional athletes share my beliefs regarding equality, and the injustices that so many humans face daily. However, I am not tolerant of a person in a public position mocking the pain suffered by so many of their fellow human beings.

I am extremely disappointed at the lukewarm response by the Red Sox. I am far from naïve in the ways of business, as well as competitive sports. That said, I believe the correct response would have been immediately release or DFA of both players. Pillar is equally wrong in his hurtful comments. After his signing, I recalled his anti-gay slurs from a few years back. As he was signed partially for “veteran leadership” I could only hope that was a one-off, and he had grown, evolved, and learned since them. Sadly, when someone shows you who they are, it is usually best to believe them.

These two quotes from Boston Globe article of 08/29/2020 seem perfunctory at best.

“You bring any group of this many people together, you’re bound to have people with different views and different thoughts,” said Bloom. “Peaceful protests are about changing minds. If we can’t look at progress that gets made towards a goal in a room of people with very different opinions — if we can’t look at that and see progress, then we’re undermining our own goals.”

“We don’t demand that everyone have the same political opinion,” added Sox CEO Sam Kennedy.

And from Masslive article of 08/31/2020

“I know there have been some negative things said the last few days about comments that he made,” Roenicke said. “If people want to get on him for the way he plays or something like that, okay, but nobody should ever question what type of guy this is. This is a really good person. He’s a great teammate. He was a great leader for these guys. I felt bad for him because it really bothered him, the comments that were made.

Is he truly a great teammate for all? Perhaps on the field he showed leadership and solidarity. How about in the clubhouse? How would a gay teammate feel about Pillar’s leadership? As in so many cases, Roenicke’s statement reflects views only from his perspective as a white, privileged male.

I agree with Sam Kennedy. We cannot expect or demand the same political opinions from all members of any organization. We should, however, expect decency, empathy, consideration of the feelings of teammate’s and fans, and recognition of others suffering where so many of us are privileged to the point of not even realizing it. The Red Sox response was simply weak PR and an attempt to offend the least amount of people possible.

We have reached the point where I must use the age-old parental line – “This is going to hurt me more than you”. I can no longer support the Red Sox unless and until the organization makes a STRONG stand for social justice, for fighting systemic racism, and showing outward and inward support for all people who are treated differently for their appearance, belief, sexuality, religion, and more.

I typically watch over 150 Sox games per year. For the first time in over 50 years, I am no longer watching games. I currently have no intentions of ever returning to Fenway Park. This will not even cause a blip on your balance sheet, but will have a significant effect on my daily life. In my mind, there are two seasons of the year – baseball season and the rest of the year.

In contrast, recent days have increased my pride and joy in being a fan of the Boston Celtics and the NBA. The words and actions of so many of their members remind me of our humanity and strength, and give me hope and encouragement. From the young Jaylen Brown to the venerated and wise elder statesman Bill Russell, these people are speaking and acting, at the risk of personal loss. They are demonstrating leadership rather than hiding behind platitudes.

There is no simple roadmap for how to solve the inequities faced by so many. Like much of your management group, I, too, am a white middle-aged male. We simply cannot put ourselves in the shoes of people who face fear daily of being mistreated, physically abused, verbally abused, assaulted, and yes, even murdered. We cannot recognize how many more opportunities many of us have that others do not; economic, educational, career, housing, so many aspects of life we take for granted are not that way for all. What each of us can do is fight for recognition of all the injustice in this country and this world. We can use our positions to speak the truth, not tired memes that justify hatefulness. We can use our wealth to sponsor programs that address injustices. We can publicly proclaim our support that BLACK LIVES MATTER. The fact we even need to say this brings me incredible sadness. We can educate, do more to encourage and enable voter turnout, address the enormous disparity in quality and financial support for education in predominantly poor communities, with high percentages of people of color. Sadly, the list is endless.

Boston Red Sox, the organization I have loved my entire life, please be bold, be willing to speak up for all, be willing to risk alienating some, be leaders in the community, the country, and the world. You have the means and the voice. Please do all in your power to work toward justice for all.

I ask these things for reasons both global and personal.

Globally, the world needs more people in positions of power to lead us all toward a more just environment. Those not being discriminated against must be part of the solution in support of every group that is oppressed. Those in positions of privilege and power must lead us toward a world where every person can live with dignify and in safety.

Personally, my selfish desire is to have reason to not lose one of my lifelong joys, being a Red Sox fan.

Thank you for reading this letter.
Fantastic. I am disappointed that this issue seems to have faded away, which is pretty much what the Red Sox wanted. Thank you for keeping it alive with your eloquent and heart-felt letter.
 

richgedman'sghost

Well-Known Member
Lifetime Member
SoSH Member
May 13, 2006
1,497
ct
Not sure if anyone was watching but the Red Sox had a moment of silence for Ruth Bader Ginsberg tonight. I know that isn't enough to please most people on this board but at least it's something. Overall I'm not defending the Red Sox in the Braiser incident, but they have done alot to help the African American cause in the past through the Red Sox Foundation and the RBI program and other such programs. Henry and Werner are also big donors to the Democratic Party. They also came out with the suicide videos "it gets better " a few years ago. They also agreed to donate millions to the BLM movement to promote social justice etc
Finally they did trade Kevin Pillar. Once again, I think the Red Sox could be criticized for not coming out stronger against Braiser's comments but overall in 19 years of ownership, I think the Red Sox have done a great job of improving race relations since taking over from Yawkey Harrington.
 

Sille Skrub

Dope
Dope
Mar 3, 2004
4,416
San Francisco, CA
Quoting myself here for context. I let this percolate for a while in my subconscious, and sent the following letter to the Red Sox this morning.

Dear Boston Red Sox,

I write this with hope of encouraging the entire organization to use its power, forum, financial position, and collective voice, to commit to being leaders and a force for social justice and true equality for all humans.

Some background on me - Being a Red Sox fan is one of my defining traits. It was assigned at birth by my Mom and Uncle, who immigrated from Europe as young children in the late 1930s. Their quickly-found love for the Sox was a huge part of their assimilation into becoming US residents and New Englanders. A move to NY in the 1960s meant my siblings and I grew up in the heart of Yankee territory. Our family was raised with stories of Ted Williams, Johnny Pesky, Dom DiMaggio, Bobby Doerr, and others. Frequent trips to Fenway Park are some of my most cherished and memorable childhood (and adult) moments. Like so many others, I have lived and died with each game, including all those years of not winning it all, so much heartbreak. In spite of the mocking of my NY Yankee fan friends and neighbors, I remained a truly loyal sox fan throughout the decades. The 2004 championship had an incredibly cathartic effect on me, far more than a non-Sox fan could ever understand. A huge moment in my life was my participation, with many family members, in Run to Home Base. The sad necessity to care for emotional wounds of so many soldiers made it an incredibly emotional experience for us all. The personal experience of finishing the run by emerging into Center Field and setting foot on the hallowed ground of Fenway Park was overwhelming. Following the LF warning track, touching the green monster, crossing home plate, soaking up so much history, conflicting emotions, memories, joys and sorrows, was a once-in-a-lifetime experience.

The recent social media post by Ryan Brasier, and follow-up quotes from Kevin Pillar have caused me to reassess my support of the franchise. I believe strongly in freedom of speech and expression of personal views, but have no tolerance for hurtful and hateful behavior. I am not so naïve to think that all professional athletes share my beliefs regarding equality, and the injustices that so many humans face daily. However, I am not tolerant of a person in a public position mocking the pain suffered by so many of their fellow human beings.

I am extremely disappointed at the lukewarm response by the Red Sox. I am far from naïve in the ways of business, as well as competitive sports. That said, I believe the correct response would have been immediately release or DFA of both players. Pillar is equally wrong in his hurtful comments. After his signing, I recalled his anti-gay slurs from a few years back. As he was signed partially for “veteran leadership” I could only hope that was a one-off, and he had grown, evolved, and learned since them. Sadly, when someone shows you who they are, it is usually best to believe them.

These two quotes from Boston Globe article of 08/29/2020 seem perfunctory at best.

“You bring any group of this many people together, you’re bound to have people with different views and different thoughts,” said Bloom. “Peaceful protests are about changing minds. If we can’t look at progress that gets made towards a goal in a room of people with very different opinions — if we can’t look at that and see progress, then we’re undermining our own goals.”

“We don’t demand that everyone have the same political opinion,” added Sox CEO Sam Kennedy.

And from Masslive article of 08/31/2020

“I know there have been some negative things said the last few days about comments that he made,” Roenicke said. “If people want to get on him for the way he plays or something like that, okay, but nobody should ever question what type of guy this is. This is a really good person. He’s a great teammate. He was a great leader for these guys. I felt bad for him because it really bothered him, the comments that were made.

Is he truly a great teammate for all? Perhaps on the field he showed leadership and solidarity. How about in the clubhouse? How would a gay teammate feel about Pillar’s leadership? As in so many cases, Roenicke’s statement reflects views only from his perspective as a white, privileged male.

I agree with Sam Kennedy. We cannot expect or demand the same political opinions from all members of any organization. We should, however, expect decency, empathy, consideration of the feelings of teammate’s and fans, and recognition of others suffering where so many of us are privileged to the point of not even realizing it. The Red Sox response was simply weak PR and an attempt to offend the least amount of people possible.

We have reached the point where I must use the age-old parental line – “This is going to hurt me more than you”. I can no longer support the Red Sox unless and until the organization makes a STRONG stand for social justice, for fighting systemic racism, and showing outward and inward support for all people who are treated differently for their appearance, belief, sexuality, religion, and more.

I typically watch over 150 Sox games per year. For the first time in over 50 years, I am no longer watching games. I currently have no intentions of ever returning to Fenway Park. This will not even cause a blip on your balance sheet, but will have a significant effect on my daily life. In my mind, there are two seasons of the year – baseball season and the rest of the year.

In contrast, recent days have increased my pride and joy in being a fan of the Boston Celtics and the NBA. The words and actions of so many of their members remind me of our humanity and strength, and give me hope and encouragement. From the young Jaylen Brown to the venerated and wise elder statesman Bill Russell, these people are speaking and acting, at the risk of personal loss. They are demonstrating leadership rather than hiding behind platitudes.

There is no simple roadmap for how to solve the inequities faced by so many. Like much of your management group, I, too, am a white middle-aged male. We simply cannot put ourselves in the shoes of people who face fear daily of being mistreated, physically abused, verbally abused, assaulted, and yes, even murdered. We cannot recognize how many more opportunities many of us have that others do not; economic, educational, career, housing, so many aspects of life we take for granted are not that way for all. What each of us can do is fight for recognition of all the injustice in this country and this world. We can use our positions to speak the truth, not tired memes that justify hatefulness. We can use our wealth to sponsor programs that address injustices. We can publicly proclaim our support that BLACK LIVES MATTER. The fact we even need to say this brings me incredible sadness. We can educate, do more to encourage and enable voter turnout, address the enormous disparity in quality and financial support for education in predominantly poor communities, with high percentages of people of color. Sadly, the list is endless.

Boston Red Sox, the organization I have loved my entire life, please be bold, be willing to speak up for all, be willing to risk alienating some, be leaders in the community, the country, and the world. You have the means and the voice. Please do all in your power to work toward justice for all.

I ask these things for reasons both global and personal.

Globally, the world needs more people in positions of power to lead us all toward a more just environment. Those not being discriminated against must be part of the solution in support of every group that is oppressed. Those in positions of privilege and power must lead us toward a world where every person can live with dignify and in safety.

Personally, my selfish desire is to have reason to not lose one of my lifelong joys, being a Red Sox fan.

Thank you for reading this letter.
This is a really great letter.

Any response from the tone deaf Red Sox organization?
 

mauf

Anderson Cooper × Mr. Rogers
Staff member
Dope
Not sure if anyone was watching but the Red Sox had a moment of silence for Ruth Bader Ginsberg tonight. I know that isn't enough to please most people on this board but at least it's something. Overall I'm not defending the Red Sox in the Braiser incident, but they have done alot to help the African American cause in the past through the Red Sox Foundation and the RBI program and other such programs. Henry and Werner are also big donors to the Democratic Party. They also came out with the suicide videos "it gets better " a few years ago. They also agreed to donate millions to the BLM movement to promote social justice etc
Finally they did trade Kevin Pillar. Once again, I think the Red Sox could be criticized for not coming out stronger against Braiser's comments but overall in 19 years of ownership, I think the Red Sox have done a great job of improving race relations since taking over from Yawkey Harrington.
I don’t want to relitigate the Brasier issue, but I believe you have misread people’s concerns.

No one is upset that the Red Sox organization is insufficiently progressive politically. I don’t even think people believe it’s current ownership’s fault that we have more than our share of problems with racism at the park — that’s obviously a problem that predates them, and reflects more on the Greater Boston community and its sports fans than it does on the Red Sox organization. But when a random relief pitcher posted something racist on Twitter during a time of heightened racial consciousness, a lot of us expected a more robust response from the organization than we got. As I said, I don’t want to relitigate that, but if you thought it was a partisan concern, you misunderstood.