Non-revenue college sports thread

riboflav

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Yup. Discussions have already started at the high school level. Freshman teams will be the first to go in my area. Then, boys' programs. As the varsity coach of a "big sport" girls team I personally feel safe but am remorseful for those who will suffer. This was one of the first things I thought of when schools started shutting down.

EDIT: Football as a boys only sport will continue to operate as an anchor at our local high schools and shut down many, many Freshman teams and other boys' programs.
 

RedOctober3829

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UVM AD Jeff Schulman said that seniors from spring sports this year are welcome back, but they won't pay for their scholarships if they exceed the allotted scholarships for that particular sport. In other words they have to fit in all incoming recruits, returning underclassmen, and seniors in under the usual allotted scholarship limits. They won't pay extra for the seniors.
 

RedOctober3829

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No surprise given the Cal State University system is online-only in the fall.

Don't think the online-only edit affects UCLA and Cal-Berkeley; but places like Fresno State, Long Beach State and San Jose State it does.
The UC system came out and said they would most likely be online only too. That is the system that UCLA and Cal are in.
 

ThePrideofShiner

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We're supposed to be finding out in the next day or two what the NCAA recommendations are. From what I've heard we are looking at game reductions varying by sport. Anywhere from four for soccer to 12 for softball.
 

RedOctober3829

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Several prominent coaches have put together a proposal to change college baseball in many ways. They're proposing to move the start of the season back to mid-March to give players more time to get ready for the season and to play in warmer weather. It will also decrease travel costs for the northern teams. Conference tournaments would be at the end of June and the NCAA tournament would start in July. The CWS would be in the middle of July. Fall ball would be much less of a commitment for the players as well.
 

Ale Xander

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SEC/FL Gators:


In the wake of the Southeastern Conference school presidents' decision to allow voluntary in-person athletics activities back on campuses across the league, the University Athletic Association announced Friday that Florida's student-athletes will start to return to campus on June 8.

Their return will happen in multiple phases over a period of several weeks and student-athletes competing in fall sports will arrive first, starting with the initial group of football players, who will begin physicals and COVID testing on May 26. Returning soccer and volleyball student-athletes will start coming back on June 15, and returning men's and women's basketball players on June 29. New student-athletes in football, soccer, men's and women's basketball and volleyball will begin arriving July 1.
 

BaseballJones

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Uconn considering dropping as many as eight sports thanks to their football incompetence. Of course, they’re not dropping football, which is the cause of these problems, and which is, by far, the biggest net financial negative on the books.

Because whatever else you do, apparently you gotta keep football.....

 

Clears Cleaver

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Forde is as dumb as it comes. There are two non-P5 schools in the country to have more than 18 sports. Uconn and BYU. One has a huge endowment and the backing or a religion. The other kept operating at a loss in hopes in getting a P5 invite. Admitting that has failed meant cutting sports. If they cut football they'd have to cut even more.

Cincinnati had to cut soccer, it was applauded.

We are headed to a world where only P5 sports matter, but even then I suspect with football revenue down many will be cutting sports as well.
 

BaseballJones

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If UConn cut football, why would they have to cut other sports? Football generates revenue, but is a massive net pile of red ink.

UConn football generated $3.3m in revenue, but had $16.6m in expenses - net loss of $13.3 million.

Men's hoops: $6m in revenue, $9.9m in expenses - net loss of $3.9 million

Women's hoops: $4.5m in revenue, $8m in expenses - net loss of $3.5 million

Everything else: $2.8m in revenue, $25.8m in expenses - net loss of $23 million

If football was actually a net financial positive, we can make the case that keeping it allows other sports to be kept.

So there's no financial argument really that says cutting football means cutting other sports too. Cutting football would simply save the university $13.3 million, end of story.

But....there might be Title IX implications. I don't know if Title IX means that you need to have as at least as many women scholarships as men, meaning you could have more, or if there needs to be the exact same number. Because in the former case, you cut football and leave everything else and simply save a ton of money. But if it's the latter, cutting football means you have to either cut other sports or add a bunch of other men's sports in order to meet the Title IX requirements.

But I'm not sure which it is.
 

Humphrey

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Can UConn prove that playing several road guarantee games* a year (instead of having to travel to AAC locations before much smaller crowds) will allow them to more or less break even? I think not, but that's what they are trying to sell.

*most of those games, they'll get killed and generate little interest in the home games, most of which will be against weaker teams (they might get a few 2 for 1s and 3 for 1s, but most of the road games will contain no quid pro quo).
 

riboflav

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If UConn cut football, why would they have to cut other sports? Football generates revenue, but is a massive net pile of red ink.

UConn football generated $3.3m in revenue, but had $16.6m in expenses - net loss of $13.3 million.

Men's hoops: $6m in revenue, $9.9m in expenses - net loss of $3.9 million

Women's hoops: $4.5m in revenue, $8m in expenses - net loss of $3.5 million

Everything else: $2.8m in revenue, $25.8m in expenses - net loss of $23 million

If football was actually a net financial positive, we can make the case that keeping it allows other sports to be kept.

So there's no financial argument really that says cutting football means cutting other sports too. Cutting football would simply save the university $13.3 million, end of story.

But....there might be Title IX implications. I don't know if Title IX means that you need to have as at least as many women scholarships as men, meaning you could have more, or if there needs to be the exact same number. Because in the former case, you cut football and leave everything else and simply save a ton of money. But if it's the latter, cutting football means you have to either cut other sports or add a bunch of other men's sports in order to meet the Title IX requirements.

But I'm not sure which it is.
Isn't the argument always how much added revenue do hoops and football generate by the mere fact that they're the biggest advertisements/branding for the school? Or, do your figures include that?
 

MuzzyField

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Under Title IX doesn't the scholarship availability have to mirror the gender makeup of the campus and isn't just a 50/50 split? At many universities women are pushing 60% of the student body and this had been putting pressure on athletic departments to drop men's sports and/or add women's sports to maintain compliance long before current economic pressures via COVID-19.

The balancing of full scholarships vs. partial also plays in the equation for athletic departments.
 

BaseballJones

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Isn't the argument always how much added revenue do hoops and football generate by the mere fact that they're the biggest advertisements/branding for the school? Or, do your figures include that?
Yes for sure and in the case of UConn hoops, great value has been added to the school. UConn’s vast hoops success has helped raise the profile of the school considerably.

Football? Uh........ hahaha no.
 

RedOctober3829

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The problem for UConn is this. The state is completely broke and to my knowledge UConn has relied on a good amount of state funds to help fund the athletic department. If I'm wrong about this please let me know. They also don't generate enough revenue around their gameday experience. Attendance is so awful. The TV contract and revenue sharing in the AAC didn't come close to bridging the gap. I read that when games were on ESPN+ that the schools were responsible for the production costs. Going to FBS has proven to be the wrong decision for UConn. If they had just done what Villanova has done and kept football FCS and left everything else in the Big East they would be much better off.

Can UConn prove that playing several road guarantee games* a year (instead of having to travel to AAC locations before much smaller crowds) will allow them to more or less break even? I think not, but that's what they are trying to sell.

*most of those games, they'll get killed and generate little interest in the home games, most of which will be against weaker teams (they might get a few 2 for 1s and 3 for 1s, but most of the road games will contain no quid pro quo).
Here are their guarantee games right now through 2025. Looks like they will play 1-2 a year. The rest are either home and homes or FCS.
2020-Virginia, Ole Miss
2021-Clemson, UCF
2022-Michigan
2023-Tennessee
2024-none yet
2025-Ohio State

They have home and homes upcoming with BC, Syracuse, UNC, Duke, NC State, Maryland, Utah State, Purdue, Army, UMass, Ball State, Buffalo, Middle Tennessee, and San Jose State. They also have buy games scheduled with Maine, Central CT(2), Holy Cross, and Lafayette(2). They just added a 4-game home and home with Temple, a home game with Wyoming in 2021, and a home-and-home with FIU.
 
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Freddy Linn

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Where it rains. No, seriously.
Brown just transitioned 11 varsity teams to club status - m/w fencing, m/w golf, women's skiing, m/w squash, women's equestrian, and men's track, field, and cross country. Upgrading coed sailing and women's sailing to varsity status. Net reduction in number of varsity teams from 38 to 29.