New thread 05/25

54thMA

Member
SoSH Member
Aug 15, 2012
9,261
Westwood MA
Really enjoyed the broadcast last night, specifically the banter between Eck and Millar. Kevin kept emphasizing how hard this "game" is to play and how when you are down, it really wears on you, the game is more mental than physical.

At one point, he said words to the effect of everyone in MLB can hit, field and run, but you have to be mentally tough and work your way through rough patches.

He also said "When the team wins a game like this and everyone in the lineup has 1 or 2 hits and you have none, you feel down, but you can't dwell on it."

Anyone who's ever played the game at any level can relate to that.

IMO they were great together.

I always laugh when someone says "Player X sucks".................yeah; no. Player X is a MLB player, he's made it to the top of his profession, maybe he's going through a rough patch, but he does not suck, he's a MLB player, the cream of the crop in a sport where a player who's successful 3 out of 10 times is considered elite.
 

Sandy Leon Trotsky

Member
SoSH Member
Mar 11, 2007
4,025
Really enjoyed the broadcast last night, specifically the banter between Eck and Millar. Kevin kept emphasizing how hard this "game" is to play and how when you are down, it really wears on you, the game is more mental than physical.

At one point, he said words to the effect of everyone in MLB can hit, field and run, but you have to be mentally tough and work your way through rough patches.

He also said "When the team wins a game like this and everyone in the lineup has 1 or 2 hits and you have none, you feel down, but you can't dwell on it."

Anyone who's ever played the game at any level can relate to that.

IMO they were great together.

I always laugh when someone says "Player X sucks".................yeah; no. Player X is a MLB player, he's made it to the top of his profession, maybe he's going through a rough patch, but he does not suck, he's a MLB player, the cream of the crop in a sport where a player who's successful 3 out of 10 times is considered elite.
There was some kid back in high school (I didn't play but would occasionally watch games) on a rival team that was just phenomenal.... absolutely destroyed the ball. Incredible defense at SS and would pitch and dominate there too. He went to a Junior College and dominated there and it seemed like he was destined for the ML's to me. Drafted in the 5th or 6th round? I can't remember... maybe the '92 or '93 draft by Cincinnati and he was just another player. Lasted 3 years in the low minors and was gone. I think his last name was Benincasa or something like that
 

DamageTrain

Well-Known Member
Gold Supporter
SoSH Member
Sep 29, 2014
408
Vermont
It was about 20 years ago here on the ballfields of VT when I was being abused by an insufferable Yankee fan (as per usual). While that year the Red Sox were in first place in mid May, he noted that the Yankees always started out slow and then always beat the Sox in the end. The Sox were a great April and May team, he said, and then they flopped. It was a joy, he said, to watch how hopeful the Sox fans got each spring and then watching that hope get crushed mid summer and into the fall. It was just another one of those conversations that have made the history of the last 20 years so much sweeter.

The sox certainly did not peak too early this year. They can flip the script in a big way. Worst to first. The Blue Jays are now within reach. The Yankees are regressing to the mean. Just keep winning the damn series!
 

54thMA

Member
SoSH Member
Aug 15, 2012
9,261
Westwood MA
There was some kid back in high school (I didn't play but would occasionally watch games) on a rival team that was just phenomenal.... absolutely destroyed the ball. Incredible defense at SS and would pitch and dominate there too. He went to a Junior College and dominated there and it seemed like he was destined for the ML's to me. Drafted in the 5th or 6th round? I can't remember... maybe the '92 or '93 draft by Cincinnati and he was just another player. Lasted 3 years in the low minors and was gone. I think his last name was Benincasa or something like that
There was a kid on my high school team, hit 500 his senior season, went to the University of Maine, another phenom similar to the one you referenced, just mashed the ball, slick fielding shortstop, cannon for an arm.............was drafted by the Red Sox, was in the low minors for a few years, hurt his knee and that was that, not sure if he ever would have made it to the show, but it proves your point about what incredible talents MLB players are, they are on a completely different level.

Millar made another comment about about how what the average fan would think/act if he was in the box and a MLB pitcher threw pitches to him in the 90's. O'Brien made a comment about how just hearing the ball would be an experience for the average fan.

When I was 16, I played in a league called Lou Gehrig, we played Methuen in the playoffs, Steve Bedrosian was pitching................I could barely see the ball, all I heard was a hissing sound and then a loud thud when it struck the catchers mitt. He was on another level back then, that's for sure.
 

mauidano

Mai Tais for everyone!
SoSH Member
Aug 21, 2006
31,877
Maui
Every town has had a kid who just dominated their youth leagues, High School etc. We've had a few from our community as well. A couple have made it big and won rings; Shane Victorino and Kurt Suzuki. It is incredibly hard for kids to make it all the way through all the levels of travel ball to college to the pros to The Show.

Seen it in my own close circle; a very close family friend's son dominated in HS and travel ball, got drafted by the D-Backs, went to Oregon and then drafted again. Made it to AA ball and constant injuries along with COVID canceling a season and he's done.

Which is why I absolutely LOVE to see kids making their MLB debut.
 

Lose Remerswaal

Well-Known Member
Lifetime Member
SoSH Member
I always laugh when someone says "Player X sucks".................yeah; no. Player X is a MLB player, he's made it to the top of his profession, maybe he's going through a rough patch, but he does not suck, he's a MLB player, the cream of the crop in a sport where a player who's successful 3 out of 10 times is considered elite.
You should avoid a certain person's posts on the main board
 

moretsyndrome

Member
SoSH Member
Jan 24, 2006
1,414
Pawtucket
There was a kid on my high school team, hit 500 his senior season, went to the University of Maine, another phenom similar to the one you referenced, just mashed the ball, slick fielding shortstop, cannon for an arm.............was drafted by the Red Sox, was in the low minors for a few years, hurt his knee and that was that, not sure if he ever would have made it to the show, but it proves your point about what incredible talents MLB players are, they are on a completely different level.

Millar made another comment about about how what the average fan would think/act if he was in the box and a MLB pitcher threw pitches to him in the 90's. O'Brien made a comment about how just hearing the ball would be an experience for the average fan.

When I was 16, I played in a league called Lou Gehrig, we played Methuen in the playoffs, Steve Bedrosian was pitching................I could barely see the ball, all I heard was a hissing sound and then a loud thud when it struck the catchers mitt. He was on another level back then, that's for sure.
To me, at about 15 or so, it was a huge neurological obstacle to go from just seeing the ball to hearing it as well. Obviously the extra velocity that produces that sinister hiss was the root cause of my mediocre hitting back then, but that sound really compounded things. It signaled the beginning of the end for me as a hitter, and for a lot of others, I'm sure.

I get amped when I have seats that are close enough to catch that sound. Major League pitching is a true marvel.
 

54thMA

Member
SoSH Member
Aug 15, 2012
9,261
Westwood MA
To me, at about 15 or so, it was a huge neurological obstacle to go from just seeing the ball to hearing it as well. Obviously the extra velocity that produces that sinister hiss was the root cause of my mediocre hitting back then, but that sound really compounded things. It signaled the beginning of the end for me as a hitter, and for a lot of others, I'm sure.

I get amped when I have seats that are close enough to catch that sound. Major League pitching is a true marvel.
Funny you mentioned age 15 or so, that's when it hit me as well. It's a sound you never forget.

I remember attending a game in 1977, we had great seats near home plate, Bill Campbell came into the game in relief.

As he warmed up, from where we were sitting, you could hear the hissing sound from the ball and then a loud pop when it hit the catchers mitt. I'll never forget that sound/that noise, it was on another level, just unreal.
 

Coachster

Member
SoSH Member
Jul 3, 2009
7,750
New Hampshire
Humble-brag alert:

There was a guy a year behind me at our rival high school. I used to have to play against him in AAU ball as well. Best player I've ever been on the field with. Drafted by the Brewers, one year in the minors, and then a long distinguished career ending with him being elected to the Hall of Fame in '99. And here's the thing; a lot of us didn't think Robin Yount wasn't the best guy on his high school team. His teammate, a year ahead of him, got drafted by the Royals, was on his way from CA to FL for spring training on his motorcycle when he crashed and tore ligaments in his throwing arm.

I only found out what happened when, in my 2nd year of community college, I ran into the other guy. I was shocked to see him till he showed me the scars on his forearm.
 

E5 Yaz

Transcends message boarding
Lifetime Member
SoSH Member
Apr 25, 2002
76,323
Oregon

Silvanus

lurker
Jun 14, 2015
9
There was a kid on my high school team, hit 500 his senior season, went to the University of Maine, another phenom similar to the one you referenced, just mashed the ball, slick fielding shortstop, cannon for an arm.............was drafted by the Red Sox, was in the low minors for a few years, hurt his knee and that was that, not sure if he ever would have made it to the show, but it proves your point about what incredible talents MLB players are, they are on a completely different level.

Millar made another comment about about how what the average fan would think/act if he was in the box and a MLB pitcher threw pitches to him in the 90's. O'Brien made a comment about how just hearing the ball would be an experience for the average fan.

When I was 16, I played in a league called Lou Gehrig, we played Methuen in the playoffs, Steve Bedrosian was pitching................I could barely see the ball, all I heard was a hissing sound and then a loud thud when it struck the catchers mitt. He was on another level back then, that's for sure.
I faced the Leiter brothers and Jeff Musselman in high school. They threw strikes and changed speeds. My OPS was easily sub 0.400 against those guys.
 

Sprowl

mikey lowell of the sandbox
Dope
Jun 27, 2006
33,787
Haiku
Bogey makes an uncharacteristically graceful play from deep in the hole. I don't usually think of Bogaerts as an elegant shortstop, but that was an elegant play.