Kyrie is hurt and we have schadenfreude

Caspir

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Jul 16, 2005
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With Durant on board for this shit show, I can’t help but think back to previous stars. If Kyrie tried this on a team with Jordan or Kobe, he is immediately shipped out before it even gets to this point. It’s incredible to me how many enabling bags of shit there are around this guy.
 

DJnVa

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Dec 16, 2010
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I generally want everyone to be happy and fulfilled, etc.

But this shit blowing up in his face is funny af and if that makes me a bad person, so be it.
 

Senator Donut

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Apr 21, 2010
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I generally want everyone to be happy and fulfilled, etc.

But this shit blowing up in his face is funny af and if that makes me a bad person, so be it.
I was embarrassed when I had an initial positive reaction to Kyrie injuring his leg. I acknowledge that was wrong and it potentially makes me a bad person.

This current news is completely self-inflicted. I take great pleasure in his suspension and I hope he continues denying himself the ability to play the sport he loves.
 

Kliq

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I enjoy Kyrie's schadenfreude but part of me does feel guilty because a lot of his behavior feels like someone having a mental health issue in front of the world.
 

dcdrew10

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I enjoy Kyrie's schadenfreude but part of me does feel guilty because a lot of his behavior feels like someone having a mental health issue in front of the world.
It's hard to tell if it's ego or mental illness. I mean there's a fine line in some cases and with Irving it is sort of a choose your own narrative. If you dislike him for whatever reason, you can say it's ego and he's a bad person. If you like him, you can say he's ill and people shouldn't be laughing at it.

On what would Jordan/Kobe/other past greats do if Irving was their teammate and possibly preventing a championship, I have to agree that Irving would be gone or I could see a situation where Jordan have some guys hold him down and personally give him a dose of J&J. Edit: before anyone says otherwise, I am not suggesting Irving should be forced, just that Jordan was/is crazy when it comes to winning/getting his way.
 

nattysez

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The Nets don't need to pay him for the Brooklyn games, per the agreement the NBA and NBAPA, but will they pay him the remainder of his salary? It doesn't sound like he's suspended without pay.
 
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reggiecleveland

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With Durant on board for this shit show, I can’t help but think back to previous stars. If Kyrie tried this on a team with Jordan or Kobe, he is immediately shipped out before it even gets to this point. It’s incredible to me how many enabling bags of shit there are around this guy.
To be fair, if it was Kobe, a guy who wants to create shots...would be just be gone.
 

wade boggs chicken dinner

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This current news is completely self-inflicted. I take great pleasure in his suspension and I hope he continues denying himself the ability to play the sport he loves.
With respect to the bolded, I think you are assuming facts that aren't in evidence.

Why do people think that Kryrie is anything but good with not playing/practicing? We're talking about a guy who took off - what, two weeks last season - because his head wasn't into playing basketball? He's also said that basketball isn't his top priority: https://itsgame7.com/kyrie-irvings-crazy-admission-on-why-nets-title-isnt-top-priority-right-now/

I was embarrassed when I had an initial positive reaction to Kyrie injuring his leg. I acknowledge that was wrong and it potentially makes me a bad person.
That being said, it doesn't make you a bad person, it just makes you human.
 

Cellar-Door

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Yeah I don't buy the idea that Kyrie won't be thrilled to get half his salary to not work, and have morons tell him he's so smart and principled is his dream scenario.
 

benhogan

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It's hard to tell if it's ego or mental illness. I mean there's a fine line in some cases and with Irving it is sort of a choose your own narrative. If you dislike him for whatever reason, you can say it's ego and he's a bad person. If you like him, you can say he's ill and people shouldn't be laughing at it.

On what would Jordan/Kobe/other past greats do if Irving was their teammate and possibly preventing a championship, I have to agree that Irving would be gone or I could see a situation where Jordan have some guys hold him down and personally give him a dose of J&J. Edit: before anyone says otherwise, I am not suggesting Irving should be forced, just that Jordan was/is crazy when it comes to winning/getting his way.
I'm not a doctor and have no idea if Kyrie has a mental illness problem.

BUT he has an entourage around him spewing the same nonsense, so maybe they all suffer from the same affliction.
 

Smokey Joe

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I enjoy Kyrie's schadenfreude but part of me does feel guilty because a lot of his behavior feels like someone having a mental health issue in front of the world.
Narcissistic personality disorder. You can have pdo and still be perfectly capable of functioning. You just don’t like being around them.
 

jose melendez

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Kyrie may be mentally ill... But he can also go fuck himself.

There's a lot of mental illness out there in the world, and a lot of it is untreated. Often it's the kind of things people can muddle through, sometimes its not. But what it never is, is an excuse for being a dick to damn near everyone. It might be an explanation for dickishness, but it's not an excuse. Kyrie has all the money in the world, access to resources that most mentally ill people don't. If his narcissitic behavior is a function of mental illness, I'll be ready to look at the seriously when he--or at the very least someone in his life--is ready to look at it seriously.
 

PC Drunken Friar

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That same BallSack Sports (wont link bogus info) is now saying he has informed the Nets that he will retire.

He is a dick to everyone and will never change. He isn't unique in that aspect, but man, I am having trouble finding a comparable player in any sport.
 

jose melendez

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That same BallSack Sports (wont link bogus info) is now saying he has informed the Nets that he will retire.

He is a dick to everyone and will never change. He isn't unique in that aspect, but man, I am having trouble finding a comparable player in any sport.
Ricky Williams, except Ricky was sort of likeable.

If Kyrie cares deeply enough to sacrifice his livelihood for his beliefs, I can respect that, but to sacrifice them for THESE beliefs makes him a schmuck.
 

singaporesoxfan

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I’ll actually have respect for Kyrie if he holds out the entire year or something. If he caves now, it’s just all been for attention.
No, we need to change this attitude that getting a shot is caving - this is the kind of thinking that has caused people who've staked out a public anti-vax position to be stuck. And this is part of why mandates are helpful - it gives people a face-saving way to change their actions without having to say they changed their minds ("I didn't want to get the shot, and still don't want to, but I had to if I wanted to do my job.") We should celebrate if Kyrie changes his mind for whatever reason, not call him attention-seeking.
 

Jimbodandy

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Ricky Williams, except Ricky was sort of likeable.

If Kyrie cares deeply enough to sacrifice his livelihood for his beliefs, I can respect that, but to sacrifice them for THESE beliefs makes him a schmuck.
Forget what beliefs they are--he's not sacrificing his livelihood for his beliefs. He's sacrificing half of his livelihood, as CD notes above. Hardly Ali.
 

Cesar Crespo

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Dec 22, 2002
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Gonna suck when Simmons for Kyrie happens. Both teams would probably better for it.

I don't see anyone trading for Kyrie though, unless future mandates and what not aren't honored by the NBA.
 

Smokey Joe

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That same BallSack Sports (wont link bogus info) is now saying he has informed the Nets that he will retire.

He is a dick to everyone and will never change. He isn't unique in that aspect, but man, I am having trouble finding a comparable player in any sport.
Really? How about Michael Jordan?
There are some recent examples in politics….
 

Minneapolis Millers

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Kyrie may be mentally ill... But he can also go fuck himself.

There's a lot of mental illness out there in the world, and a lot of it is untreated. Often it's the kind of things people can muddle through, sometimes its not. But what it never is, is an excuse for being a dick to damn near everyone. It might be an explanation for dickishness, but it's not an excuse. Kyrie has all the money in the world, access to resources that most mentally ill people don't. If his narcissitic behavior is a function of mental illness, I'll be ready to look at the seriously when he--or at the very least someone in his life--is ready to look at it seriously.
Agree 100%. I'm tired of people giving out possible excuses to pampered, entitled, enabled assholes. And I'm also tired of the whole "respect his personal choice" crap. It's a pandemic and public health crisis and this POS isn't just selfishly hurting his team, he is wilfully accepting the risk of endangering others. He can make the choice to not take basic precautions against infecting others, but I sure as hell don't have to respect it, don't think we as a society should, and think we should instead insist that, if he makes that choice, then he stay the hell away from everyone else. NYC's and the Nets' positions are reasonable.
 
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Kliq

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Kyrie may be mentally ill... But he can also go fuck himself.

There's a lot of mental illness out there in the world, and a lot of it is untreated. Often it's the kind of things people can muddle through, sometimes its not. But what it never is, is an excuse for being a dick to damn near everyone. It might be an explanation for dickishness, but it's not an excuse. Kyrie has all the money in the world, access to resources that most mentally ill people don't. If his narcissitic behavior is a function of mental illness, I'll be ready to look at the seriously when he--or at the very least someone in his life--is ready to look at it seriously.
I agree with this. I guess I feel more guilty about finding particular enjoyment out of his behavior. He's fun to make fun of, but watching him spiral downwards is eventually going to cease being enjoyable and become more worrisome.
 

Ed Hillel

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That same BallSack Sports (wont link bogus info) is now saying he has informed the Nets that he will retire.

He is a dick to everyone and will never change. He isn't unique in that aspect, but man, I am having trouble finding a comparable player in any sport.
Why would Kyrie give up millions of dollars for no reason?
 

nighthob

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Jul 15, 2005
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Kyrie may be mentally ill... But he can also go fuck himself.

There's a lot of mental illness out there in the world, and a lot of it is untreated. Often it's the kind of things people can muddle through, sometimes its not. But what it never is, is an excuse for being a dick to damn near everyone. It might be an explanation for dickishness, but it's not an excuse. Kyrie has all the money in the world, access to resources that most mentally ill people don't. If his narcissitic behavior is a function of mental illness, I'll be ready to look at the seriously when he--or at the very least someone in his life--is ready to look at it seriously.
Honestly anyone that monomaniacally focused is going to have issues. It's why I'm never surprised that sports stars are terrible human beings. The kind of focus necessary to get that good at something pretty much always comes at the cost of awareness of the rest of humanity. Which is where the weirdness starts. Irving, of course, seems to be one of the extreme examples.
 

Tony C

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Honestly anyone that monomaniacally focused is going to have issues. It's why I'm never surprised that sports stars are terrible human beings. The kind of focus necessary to get that good at something pretty much always comes at the cost of awareness of the rest of humanity. Which is where the weirdness starts. Irving, of course, seems to be one of the extreme examples.
Fully agree with your general point, but Kyrie is an exception to that rule, no? He's not at all monomaniacally focused -- to the contrary he's in a constant state of narcissistic distraction.

Btw, big ups to the Nets -- I would not have expected that decision (one that, I"d presume, had sign-off from KD...or is that too much speculation?).
 

mikeford

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I enjoy Kyrie's schadenfreude but part of me does feel guilty because a lot of his behavior feels like someone having a mental health issue in front of the world.
Nah.

As someone with mental health issues who has studied other mental health issues, this seems like a much more simple case of a guy who is an asshole being an asshole and having the money to afford continuing his asshole behavior.

He's not depressed, he's not bi-polar, he's not schizophrenic; he's a dumb person doing dumb things and being enabled because he's talented at something and has money.
 

nighthob

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Fully agree with your general point, but Kyrie is an exception to that rule, no? He's not at all monomaniacally focused -- to the contrary he's in a constant state of narcissistic distraction.
Oh, I'm not arguing about his narcissistic distraction, I'm saying that at the heart of it is that the amount of work it takes to get that good at basketball (or anything, really). That he's one of the greatest dribblers in hoops history can't really be argued.
 

wade boggs chicken dinner

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Fully agree with your general point, but Kyrie is an exception to that rule, no? He's not at all monomaniacally focused -- to the contrary he's in a constant state of narcissistic distraction.
What Nighthob said but I'll just say if you read about Pritchard, you will get an inkling of how much work athletes at this level put in. I mean I'm sure they enjoy the work - or at least the beating everyone - but Pritchard, just for one example, home schooled so he could go to the gym two or three (or more) hours every day and basically stopped having a normal social life from something like age 11 IIRC.

As Scalabrine said, professional athletes generally have this extra motivation - or narcissism, if you will - that the rest of us just don't have. From this article - https://www.mcall.com/news/nation-world/ct-aud-nw-nyt-worst-nba-player-better-than-you-20210419-dhyabjli55gu5deifhfdtjg2fa-story.html:

End-of-the-bench NBA players may even have to work harder than stars to stay in the league, because one missed assignment could be the difference between having a job or not.
“I can go into any gym right now and I can find some of the best players going through the motions sometimes,” Scalabrine said. “Can you imagine 15 straight years? Maybe even more like 17, 18, straight years of never going through the motions?”
He said professional athletes, even retired ones, had an extra gear that an average person could not tap into. He referred to it as the “dark place.”
“I would always say things, like in a game, ‘If I miss this next shot, my kids are going to die,’” Scalabrine said. “I would say that to myself, just to get through, just to put the pressure so I can lock in and make the shot.”