Joe Posnanski's 60 Greatest Baseball Moments

bankshot1

Member
SoSH Member
Feb 12, 2003
18,086
where I was last at
i wonder how many non-on field events make the list?

Jackie Robinson breaking the color line

Sale of Babe Ruth

Black Sox scandal

Lou Gehrig's goodbye

I may have to open the wallet
 

The Gray Eagle

Member
SoSH Member
Aug 1, 2001
13,401
As Joe says in the linked article:

These 60 Moments are not the most important moments in baseball history. Yes, there are some important moments in here, some that you will no doubt expect. But let me give you advance warning: There are a bunch of important moments that are not in here. You can start your rage engines now.

Instead, these are 60 Moments that, to me, best express the joy and wonder of the game. They are touching. They are silly. They are goosebumpy. They are game-changing. There are a lot of surprises, I hope. Even some of the most famous moments might have an unexpected twist or two.
Don't get hung up on the ranking aspect of it. It's going to be 60 great stories about baseball, told really well.
 

Bergs

Well-Known Member
Gold Supporter
SoSH Member
Jul 22, 2005
13,592

Oppo

Member
SoSH Member
Apr 5, 2009
1,407
Orlando
i wonder how many non-on field events make the list?

Jackie Robinson breaking the color line

Sale of Babe Ruth

Black Sox scandal

Lou Gehrig's goodbye

I may have to open the wallet
2 other non-game action moments:
Boston centric pick- Ortiz’s this is our fucking city moment
Bush’s NY World Series first pitch post-9/11

edit: aaaand Ted Williams at the all star game in Fenway
Man, there’s way to many to choose
 

Merkle's Boner

Member
SoSH Member
Apr 24, 2011
2,462

johnmd20

figuratively like ebola
Lifetime Member
SoSH Member
Dec 30, 2003
42,895
New York City
Speaking of close to home, trigger warnings may be needed around here for #55. Which I will not spoil except to say that it's a measure of Posnanski's brilliance that he can make even that grim night entertaining reading.
That was a grim, brutal, but utterly incredible night for baseball. It was insane.

And a great column by Poz.
 

LogansDad

Member
SoSH Member
Nov 15, 2006
17,990
Alamogordo
Oh man. I have such a love/hate relationship with that night. One the one hand, it sucked. On the other, it may have been the single greatest regular season day of baseball of the decade. Longoria literally made contact with his game ending home run the instant I switched over to that game from watching the Sox lose. It was awful.
 

Mighty Joe Young

The North remembers
Silver Supporter
SoSH Member
Sep 14, 2002
5,388
Halifax, Nova Scotia , Canada
No, guess I just missed that one. Didn’t make it because of poor frequency response, article says. Also, that’s almost exactly double the resonant frequency of the earth. Get enough of them going and you could change the earth’s tilt or something.
I think I had, at one time a 16rpm disk .. that being said my record player had a 16rpm setting. It was great for learning fiddle tunes as it was almost the same tuning (a little flat) as a standard LP - but half the speed.
 

Bergs

Well-Known Member
Gold Supporter
SoSH Member
Jul 22, 2005
13,592
Oh man. I have such a love/hate relationship with that night. One the one hand, it sucked. On the other, it may have been the single greatest regular season day of baseball of the decade. Longoria literally made contact with his game ending home run the instant I switched over to that game from watching the Sox lose. It was awful.
That team just ran out of pitching. We had zero chance in the playoffs anyway. I was hoping to crack open the game thread, but it doesn't appear to be in the archives.
 

LogansDad

Member
SoSH Member
Nov 15, 2006
17,990
Alamogordo
Today's was on the opening of Baseball-Reference, and this quote, in particular, made me do a double take:

But the more questions Baseball-Reference answered, the more complicated the questions became, and soon they began offering the opportunity to search individual games, then the opportunity to search individual splits, so that it now takes a second to answer who hit the most two-out homers in 2019 (Gary Sánchez with 18) or who hit the most home runs in a career when facing a pitcher for the fourth time or more in a game.*

*The answer to this question is Babe Ruth with 111. Nobody is close. I actually think this is important: One-seventh of Ruth’s home runs were hit when facing the pitcher the fourth or fifth or sixth time through the lineup. Henry Aaron had only 79 such homers. Barry Bonds had only 33 such homers. Mike Trout has 11. Different game.
The rest of it continues to be awesome, as well.

Going back to yesterday's, it was on Zack Greinke, who is probably my favorite non-Red Sox player of this century, and the stories were wonderful.
 

Kliq

Member
SoSH Member
Mar 31, 2013
11,842
I mean, Ruth hit way more home runs than anyone else in the 1920s, when you were more likely to face a pitcher who was being shelled throughout the game than at any point after. I think it is a given for most historians that when evaluating Ruth, it is taken into consideration that he was often facing tired arms that guys in later generations didn't face.
 

67YAZ

Member
SoSH Member
Dec 1, 2000
2,270
Today is about Buck O’Neil and Pos is always at his most passionate writing about Buck.

But what became clear in this piece is that this article and his recent one on Minnie Minoso is an effort to lobby for both players to get into the HoF. The Early and Golden Era committees both meet this summer, so Joe is making some cases.
 
Last edited: