Golf equipment, WITB

Lose Remerswaal

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I will have to take a look. I expect it was a $200 set at the time, so unlikely anything special there. The bag is newer and lightweight, and there are probably balls and toes, too. I am sure the balls are next to useless by now.
 

bsan34

lurker
Jul 31, 2006
220
C'ville, VA / Hingham, MA
I've always liked the look , solid feel, and absurd forgiveness of the older Ping G series irons and wedges. Played a few iterations for years before getting fit for the Wishons, and I want to go back to them. Picked up a set of Rapture V2 4-SW off eBay, keeping an eye out for a LW with the same shaft, and am waiting to hear back from Ping on if they still will refinish these. If so, a set of "new" Raptures would be absolutely sick.
 

Mr Mulliner

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Jan 16, 2001
791
This should be fun…

Driver: a 7 or 8 year old Taylor Made my buddy gave me a couple years ago. No idea what it is, but it has a white head, extra stiff shaft (he was embarrassed I was using Taylor Made driver from the early 2000s and just told me to take it)
3 wood: same vintage Taylor Made, same shaft

Irons (2-w): maxfli revolution stiff shaft. Bought off the shelf in 1998(?). Been using them since.

SW, GW: Titleist (56, 52). Won them at a charity event 10-12 years ago

putter: some old Ping putter I found in my dad’s garage a decade ago

I’m way into gear for lots of other stuff, but not golf, obviously. Friends keep telling me I need to get fitted and modern clubs make a huge difference, etc.

But they keep getting new shit and they’re still not getting better than me (I’m a 10, have been as low as 8, most friends are about the same). So until I decide to start playing more than 8-10 rounds a year, it feels like a waste of money.

Am I wrong? If I’m going to drop a grand or two on new clubs I feel like I’d be better off getting lessons or something (another thing I’ve never done). I’m not good enough for technology to make that much difference.

This may be my father’s fault, as he had me grow up playing with his grandfather’s Wilson Staff blades that must have been from the 60s (minus the 7 iron that my great-grandfather threw in a lake). After those things, anything feels good.
 

dhappy42

Straw Man
Oct 27, 2013
13,522
Michigan
This should be fun…

Driver: a 7 or 8 year old Taylor Made my buddy gave me a couple years ago. No idea what it is, but it has a white head, extra stiff shaft (he was embarrassed I was using Taylor Made driver from the early 2000s and just told me to take it)
3 wood: same vintage Taylor Made, same shaft

Irons (2-w): maxfli revolution stiff shaft. Bought off the shelf in 1998(?). Been using them since.

SW, GW: Titleist (56, 52). Won them at a charity event 10-12 years ago

putter: some old Ping putter I found in my dad’s garage a decade ago

I’m way into gear for lots of other stuff, but not golf, obviously. Friends keep telling me I need to get fitted and modern clubs make a huge difference, etc.

But they keep getting new shit and they’re still not getting better than me (I’m a 10, have been as low as 8, most friends are about the same). So until I decide to start playing more than 8-10 rounds a year, it feels like a waste of money.

Am I wrong? If I’m going to drop a grand or two on new clubs I feel like I’d be better off getting lessons or something (another thing I’ve never done). I’m not good enough for technology to make that much difference.

This may be my father’s fault, as he had me grow up playing with his grandfather’s Wilson Staff blades that must have been from the 60s (minus the 7 iron that my great-grandfather threw in a lake). After those things, anything feels good.
You’re not wrong. The only place you might see an improvement with new clubs are the driver and fairway wood. If you’re relatively accurate with your irons and wedges, no need to upgrade them. Old Ping putters are as good as anything new.

Can you hit that 2 iron? If not you might try a hybrid or 5 wood.
 

Mr Mulliner

Member
SoSH Member
Jan 16, 2001
791
You’re not wrong. The only place you might see an improvement with new clubs are the driver and fairway wood. If you’re relatively accurate with your irons and wedges, no need to upgrade them. Old Ping putters are as good as anything new.

Can you hit that 2 iron? If not you might try a hybrid or 5 wood.
I mean, I'm accurate if I make a good swing. And super in-accurate if I don't. I have lost about a club of distance since my 20s, but I've always assumed it's not the hammer that makes a difference.

2 iron is great with a good lie. I used to use it off the tee a lot, during the decade or so where I didn't use a driver - I could draw or cut it 220-230 an hit the fairway like 75% of the time (and when I made a bad swing it was 10 yds in the rough, not 40 like the driver, which I could only slice). Probably would be better with a hybrid now. I'm certainly not good enough to be carrying a 2 iron around these days.

For those who have been fitted for irons - how flexible is the process? I'm weird in that I very often have a different swing every time I play, or even hole to hole. Since I don't play a lot, and I'm very much a feel person when it comes to sports, I will sometimes play half a round with an over the top, cut swing. Then I'll start push slicing and switch to a shallow, inside out. Leaving aside the "that's why you're not good at golf", would I need to "decide" on a swing in order to make a custom fitting worth it? I change the distance I stand from the ball, my stance, swing path - all kinds of things during a round, based on what's happening. So would lie angle or anything like that be useless for someone like me?
 

Average Game James

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Apr 28, 2016
3,340
I mean, I'm accurate if I make a good swing. And super in-accurate if I don't. I have lost about a club of distance since my 20s, but I've always assumed it's not the hammer that makes a difference.

2 iron is great with a good lie. I used to use it off the tee a lot, during the decade or so where I didn't use a driver - I could draw or cut it 220-230 an hit the fairway like 75% of the time (and when I made a bad swing it was 10 yds in the rough, not 40 like the driver, which I could only slice). Probably would be better with a hybrid now. I'm certainly not good enough to be carrying a 2 iron around these days.

For those who have been fitted for irons - how flexible is the process? I'm weird in that I very often have a different swing every time I play, or even hole to hole. Since I don't play a lot, and I'm very much a feel person when it comes to sports, I will sometimes play half a round with an over the top, cut swing. Then I'll start push slicing and switch to a shallow, inside out. Leaving aside the "that's why you're not good at golf", would I need to "decide" on a swing in order to make a custom fitting worth it? I change the distance I stand from the ball, my stance, swing path - all kinds of things during a round, based on what's happening. So would lie angle or anything like that be useless for someone like me?
To quote my instructor, “all your swings look the same.” Even if you feel like you’re doing something radically different, you probably aren’t. I’ve fought him on it and the video vindicates him every time.

That said, let’s say you are actually making a few different swings… many aspects of what will fit you into a certain club and shaft won’t change regardless. Length and flex should stay the same and unless your tempo completely changes then the club should load similarly so the shaft profile that works is probably similar too. I’ve made what feel like some pretty major swing changes in the past two years that have added probably 15mph of club head speed and when I got refit I ended up in the same shaft just up a flex. Certain characteristics of any golf swing are fairly static.

Iron technology has changed enough in the past 20 years that you should see some benefit. I’d be shocked if a modern iron doesn’t get you more distance and greater forgiveness on mishits.
 

Comfortably Lomb

Koko the Monkey
SoSH Member
Feb 22, 2004
11,933
The Paris of the 80s
This should be fun…
Driver is the only club where you can straight up buy a better game. They're incredibly good at retaining ball speed on off-center contact now compared to a decade ago. Finding something used from the past couple years would probably be a worthwhile upgrade over what you have now.

Otherwise, there's nothing wrong with with the rest of that equipment for you unless something is wildly off (e.g., irons way too short/long, too heavy, etc.). Though, I agree with dhappy... you should consider ditching the 2/3 irons in favor of a higher lofted fairway wood and/or hybrids.

Iron technology has changed enough in the past 20 years that you should see some benefit. I’d be shocked if a modern iron doesn’t get you more distance and greater forgiveness on mishits.
Minor quibble here. I doubt he'll see significant improvement unless going right on the Blade/Conventional -> GI -> SGI spectrum. If those Maxfli irons are what I'm thinking of they're basically generic 90s cavity backs. Not the hardest to hit but not loaded with technology either. There are still very nice sets of irons sold today that are probably harder to hit than those. People have been more willing to play more forgiving irons lately but a lot of the tech has been around for a long time.
 

Average Game James

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Apr 28, 2016
3,340
Driver is the only club where you can straight up buy a better game. They're incredibly good at retaining ball speed on off-center contact now compared to a decade ago. Finding something used from the past couple years would probably be a worthwhile upgrade over what you have now.

Otherwise, there's nothing wrong with with the rest of that equipment for you unless something is wildly off (e.g., irons way too short/long, too heavy, etc.). Though, I agree with dhappy... you should consider ditching the 2/3 irons in favor of a higher lofted fairway wood and/or hybrids.



Minor quibble here. I doubt he'll see significant improvement unless going right on the Blade/Conventional -> GI -> SGI spectrum. If those Maxfli irons are what I'm thinking of they're basically generic 90s cavity backs. Not the hardest to hit but not loaded with technology either. There are still very nice sets of irons sold today that are probably harder to hit than those. People have been more willing to play more forgiving irons lately but a lot of the tech has been around for a long time.
Not 100% sure I agree with you here. I mean, yes, there are absolutely classic cavity backs and blades out there today that aren’t any easier to hit than 20 year old models, but that ignores a lot of development in the space between traditional game improvement models and traditional players irons. Is a Titleist 620CB going to be a huge leap forward? Not at all. But a T100 or a Mizuno HMB-20 or a Srixon ZX7 or an Apex Pro? Absolutely. There’s a reason we see more and more tour pros in these profiles and not blades.
 

dhappy42

Straw Man
Oct 27, 2013
13,522
Michigan
Not 100% sure I agree with you here. I mean, yes, there are absolutely classic cavity backs and blades out there today that aren’t any easier to hit than 20 year old models, but that ignores a lot of development in the space between traditional game improvement models and traditional players irons. Is a Titleist 620CB going to be a huge leap forward? Not at all. But a T100 or a Mizuno HMB-20 or a Srixon ZX7 or an Apex Pro? Absolutely. There’s a reason we see more and more tour pros in these profiles and not blades.
Sure, the latest GI and SGI irons are going to be easier to hit than 20-year-old cavity-backs, but the original question was "are new clubs worth it?" for someone who plays 8-10 rounds a year. I'd keep the old irons and splash on a new(ish) driver.
 

Comfortably Lomb

Koko the Monkey
SoSH Member
Feb 22, 2004
11,933
The Paris of the 80s
Not 100% sure I agree with you here. I mean, yes, there are absolutely classic cavity backs and blades out there today that aren’t any easier to hit than 20 year old models, but that ignores a lot of development in the space between traditional game improvement models and traditional players irons. Is a Titleist 620CB going to be a huge leap forward? Not at all. But a T100 or a Mizuno HMB-20 or a Srixon ZX7 or an Apex Pro? Absolutely. There’s a reason we see more and more tour pros in these profiles and not blades.
Right, but it's not really that irons have gotten more forgiving, it's that manufacturers made more forgiving irons more palatable to elite players.
 

Average Game James

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Apr 28, 2016
3,340
Right, but it's not really that irons have gotten more forgiving, it's that manufacturers made more forgiving irons more palatable to elite players.
If you want to frame it that way, sure. The irons they make the same way as the 20 year old ones haven’t gotten any better. But there are irons available today that are more forgiving than a traditional cavity back without the same trade off that used to be required to get that forgiveness in terms of workability, feel, and aesthetics.
 

ngruz25

Bibby
SoSH Member
Sep 20, 2005
16,953
Pittsburgh, PA
I had my first iron fitting about a month ago. I've always played just whatever I happened to like, bought second hand.

I used the Mizuno Shaft Optimizer and it fit me into the KBS S-Taper 120g stiff shafts. I tried a bunch of different heads, but really like the Mizuno Hot Metal Pro. The numbers and ball flight I was seeing in that setup was great - I'm a high spin player and these were giving me a nice, controlled height and good spin numbers. I placed an order for that setup and hoped they would arrive in time for the spring.

I placed my order on 11/3 and my irons arrived today, on 11/11. Given the delivery delays that are affecting nearly every industry, I am flabbergasted that a custom set of irons arrived that fast. I guess my season isn't over?
 

Comfortably Lomb

Koko the Monkey
SoSH Member
Feb 22, 2004
11,933
The Paris of the 80s
So . . . worthless?
Are the irons the 845s? Those had a cult following for a while in the early 90s and a long production run. Fred Couples and Davis Love III played them for a while IIRC. They might not be worthless but aren't worth much and there might only be a small handful of potential buyers. Later Tommy Armour irons were junk tier equipment IIRC.

I doubt anyone would buy the driver and woods.

If you're worried about dropping off things of real value at thrift store here, you're safe.
 

yeahlunchbox

Member
SoSH Member
Jan 21, 2008
559
Driver: TaylorMade M6 D-type, 10.5 degree, Project X Even Flow Max Carry 45
Irons: Callaway Rogue, 5-PW. 5 iron is 23 degrees, pitching wedge is 44 degrees
Wedge: Callaway Jaws MD5 50 degrees
Putter: Ping Pal 2

I feel comfortable with all of these clubs and they're all fairly new outside of the Ping putter I found in the woods in the late 90's/early 00's. The rest of the bag is a random 3 wood from the no-name set I bought in spring of 97, something called an Orbiter Tri-Rail that my dad got in the late 90s/early 00's which is basically a 13 degree hybrid club and then 56, 60, and 64 degree no name wedges I've had for years. These five clubs are where I'm looking to make changes in my bag. I can't afford a proper fitting so I found a website that basically said with my swing speed and carry distances which I got from a simulator I should be looking at
1. 3 or 4 wood
2. 5 wood
3. 7 wood, 17-20 degree hybrid, or 3 iron
4. 20-23 degree hybrid or 4 iron
5. 56 degree wedge

I'm thinking a low lofted 3 wood, 5 wood, a hybrid, and the 56 degree wedge are probably good ideas for me to get/replace.

My questions are, isn't four clubs between my 10.5 degree driver and 23 degree five iron just too much clutter and not enough gapping? I don't really hit my 60 and 64 degree wedges, though I'm not sure if that's because I just don't hit them well or don't have a great idea of how far they go so I default to other clubs. Are 50 and 56 degree wedges really all I need below my 44 degree pitching wedge? Also they recommend a 20-23 degree hybrid when I already have a 5 iron at 23 degrees. Would I really see much of a difference between a hybrid and an iron at such similar lofts?
 

yeahlunchbox

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Jan 21, 2008
559
Co-sign this. That would be my first place to look, but inventory is definitely down lately.
Can confirm. I got my irons and 50 wedge through the website. They were shipped fast and the condition description was accurate.

Sorry, this is in regards to the Callaway pre-owned site.
 

dhappy42

Straw Man
Oct 27, 2013
13,522
Michigan
Driver: TaylorMade M6 D-type, 10.5 degree, Project X Even Flow Max Carry 45
Irons: Callaway Rogue, 5-PW. 5 iron is 23 degrees, pitching wedge is 44 degrees
Wedge: Callaway Jaws MD5 50 degrees
Putter: Ping Pal 2

My questions are, isn't four clubs between my 10.5 degree driver and 23 degree five iron just too much clutter and not enough gapping?
I’d say that depends on how far you hit your driver and 5-iron. A 4-wood/7-wood combo should fill that gap. Add a 3-hybrid or 4-hybrid if you want/need a rescue club

I don't really hit my 60 and 64 degree wedges, though I'm not sure if that's because I just don't hit them well or don't have a great idea of how far they go so I default to other clubs. Are 50 and 56 degree wedges really all I need below my 44 degree pitching wedge?
Probably. I have a 60* in my bag but hardly ever use it. And when I do, there’s a 50-50 chance I’ll thin the ball over the green.

Also they recommend a 20-23 degree hybrid when I already have a 5 iron at 23 degrees. Would I really see much of a difference between a hybrid and an iron at such similar lofts?
The hybrid will probably have a longer shaft so it should carry a bit further. It should also fly higher and land softer.[/quote][/quote]
 
Last edited:

Freddy Linn

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Jul 14, 2005
8,969
Where it rains. No, seriously.
I would argue that for the vast majority of players, if they don't use a 3-wood off the tee at least situationally, they shouldn't have one in the bag at all. Hybrids are your friend.

I would also say that the vast majority of players don't need more loft than, say, 58. Fill the now ridiculous gap between what is stamped a PW and your "gap" wedge. Also, pay more attention to bounce than loft.
 

Comfortably Lomb

Koko the Monkey
SoSH Member
Feb 22, 2004
11,933
The Paris of the 80s
I would also say that the vast majority of players don't need more loft than, say, 58. Fill the now ridiculous gap between what is stamped a PW and your "gap" wedge.
Titleist T400 irons PW is 38 degrees. So to get up to around 50 degrees they also have a W at 43 and W2 at 49. On one hand I guess whatever is stamped on the bottom doesn't really matter but on the other it's really silly.

I feel like for many players their 60 degree wedges costs them more shots than it saves. I dropped from 60 to 58 and didn't really notice any meaningful difference in the ability to open it up (but grinds matter a lot there). It's slightly less disaster prone.
 

Dave Stapleton

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Oct 11, 2001
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Let me add one thing I really learned recently. I am a 12/13 so take this as you will. I think it is really important to think about your wedges bounce and grind more that the loft at our level. Unless you are hitting a lot of full strength wedge shots it's all about bounce. My short game dramatically improved when I put two wedges in my bag specifically designed for tight lie shots, sand, and heavy rough. You can always adjust the type of shot you hit distancewise but being able to stand over these shots with confidence about making soild contact is so valuable. Specifically, I hit my 56 out of greenside rough and sand and my 60 off of tight lies or if I try to make a hero flop shot (which I should never do as I am not a good enough player).

If you want to take it up a level, spend some time on Titleist Volkey's website and look at the difference in their grinds. Try to suit the correct one for the conditions you generally play (or end up in).
 

FL4WL3SS

my name sucks
SoSH Member
Jul 31, 2006
13,010
Andy Brickley's potty mouth
Let me add one thing I really learned recently. I am a 12/13 so take this as you will. I think it is really important to think about your wedges bounce and grind more that the loft at our level. Unless you are hitting a lot of full strength wedge shots it's all about bounce. My short game dramatically improved when I put two wedges in my bag specifically designed for tight lie shots, sand, and heavy rough. You can always adjust the type of shot you hit distancewise but being able to stand over these shots with confidence about making soild contact is so valuable. Specifically, I hit my 56 out of greenside rough and sand and my 60 off of tight lies or if I try to make a hero flop shot (which I should never do as I am not a good enough player).

If you want to take it up a level, spend some time on Titleist Volkey's website and look at the difference in their grinds. Try to suit the correct one for the conditions you generally play (or end up in).
I gotta be honest, I just replaced all my wedges with the new Cleveland RTX that only come in high/mid/low bounce and it was both much easier to pick a wedge and they've performed much better than Vokeys I've had in the past.
 

FL4WL3SS

my name sucks
SoSH Member
Jul 31, 2006
13,010
Andy Brickley's potty mouth
Speaking of which, I just replaced my entire bag over the past month. I hate replacing equipment and everything was 4.5 years old (replaced the whole bag then).

I bought the Srixon ZX7 irons (kept the same shafts, Project X 6.5) and they are by far my favorite irons I've ever owned. They are fun to hit, my misses are great, and I can work the ball.

I just got my driver in this past weekend - TM Stealth w/Ventus blue shaft. I had a love/hate relationship with my previous driver (I actually took it back when I first bought it), but learned to hit it decently. It was cut down an inch, which I didn't do this time. I hit the new one 9 times Saturday and hit 8 fairways, pretty happy so far.

I also took my 3W out of the bag and replaced it with a 2 driving iron (Srixon) with a matching Ventus Blue shaft. I didn't use the 3W much and had a huge gap between my 3i (230) and my 3W (270). This 2i fills in nicely (250).

I already mentioned the wedges, they are great.
 

Comfortably Lomb

Koko the Monkey
SoSH Member
Feb 22, 2004
11,933
The Paris of the 80s
Let me add one thing I really learned recently. I am a 12/13 so take this as you will. I think it is really important to think about your wedges bounce and grind more that the loft at our level. Unless you are hitting a lot of full strength wedge shots it's all about bounce. My short game dramatically improved when I put two wedges in my bag specifically designed for tight lie shots, sand, and heavy rough. You can always adjust the type of shot you hit distancewise but being able to stand over these shots with confidence about making soild contact is so valuable. Specifically, I hit my 56 out of greenside rough and sand and my 60 off of tight lies or if I try to make a hero flop shot (which I should never do as I am not a good enough player).

If you want to take it up a level, spend some time on Titleist Volkey's website and look at the difference in their grinds. Try to suit the correct one for the conditions you generally play (or end up in).
I've been playing a 2 wedge bag for several years: Vokey 54F and 58D. I basically default to the 54 unless there's a reason I need the 58. It makes it easy to choose a club for me. Both are on the higher bounce side of the spectrum.

I recall in the 00's lots of players were throwing low bounce wedges in their bags because of the tour trends at the time but they're prone to digging, especially into softer turf. Maybe in Texas you want that 60 degree wedge with 4 degrees of bounce but it might not be a great idea in New England.

FWIW, I used to carry a few different low bounce 60, and the Vokey 60M at one point, and really haven't noticed that with the 58D that I can't do anything I could with the 60s, just that the 58 is a bit less prone to terrible shots.

I gotta be honest, I just replaced all my wedges with the new Cleveland RTX that only come in high/mid/low bounce and it was both much easier to pick a wedge and they've performed much better than Vokeys I've had in the past.
They seem well regarded still despite Cleveland's brand kind of fading into second tier status. I think they're actually what the Srixon tour players are using since Srixon doesn't seem to have wedges in its lineup.

All of the EOM seem to make good wedges though. Honestly, the secret sauce for me was realizing I needed slightly longer wedges (I have my 50-58 degree clubs all the same loft and lie angle). I'm 6'2" and standard length wedge lengths are just too short for me even if I play standard length irons.
 

Zomp

Dope
Dope
Aug 28, 2006
13,403
The Slums of Shaolin
I love my MG3 TW grind 56 and 60 wedges. I got them in the off season and there was a learning curve but my short game around the greens has always been a strength and it’s nice to be able to be aggressive with the wedges and have the confidence that I know what they’ll do to the ball.

I’ve said it many times in threads like this but all manufacturers make good to great products. It’s really just a matter of preference once you figure out the style of club for your game
 

FL4WL3SS

my name sucks
SoSH Member
Jul 31, 2006
13,010
Andy Brickley's potty mouth
I also love my ZX7’s. You came from Miuras right?
I did. My 8i shaft broke taking a swing on the range a month+ ago and when I got fitted for the Miuras the Srixons were a close second so figured I'd give them a go this time and didn't bother getting fitted again since I love the Project X shafts.

Weren't you playing Sub 70 clubs?
 

FL4WL3SS

my name sucks
SoSH Member
Jul 31, 2006
13,010
Andy Brickley's potty mouth
I've been playing a 2 wedge bag for several years: Vokey 54F and 58D. I basically default to the 54 unless there's a reason I need the 58. It makes it easy to choose a club for me. Both are on the higher bounce side of the spectrum.

I recall in the 00's lots of players were throwing low bounce wedges in their bags because of the tour trends at the time but they're prone to digging, especially into softer turf. Maybe in Texas you want that 60 degree wedge with 4 degrees of bounce but it might not be a great idea in New England.

FWIW, I used to carry a few different low bounce 60, and the Vokey 60M at one point, and really haven't noticed that with the 58D that I can't do anything I could with the 60s, just that the 58 is a bit less prone to terrible shots.



They seem well regarded still despite Cleveland's brand kind of fading into second tier status. I think they're actually what the Srixon tour players are using since Srixon doesn't seem to have wedges in its lineup.

All of the EOM seem to make good wedges though. Honestly, the secret sauce for me was realizing I needed slightly longer wedges (I have my 50-58 degree clubs all the same loft and lie angle). I'm 6'2" and standard length wedge lengths are just too short for me even if I play standard length irons.
I was playing Bettinardi wedges before buying the Cleveland wedges. I loved those, but honestly, the price difference isn't worth it. You can only do so much with wedge technology and find similar performance with the Cleveland's (I actually probably like them a bit better).

For whatever reason, I don't really like the Vokeys and I've always been a Titleist fanboy. They just don't look and feel right to me.
 

Zomp

Dope
Dope
Aug 28, 2006
13,403
The Slums of Shaolin
I did. My 8i shaft broke taking a swing on the range a month+ ago and when I got fitted for the Miuras the Srixons were a close second so figured I'd give them a go this time and didn't bother getting fitted again since I love the Project X shafts.

Weren't you playing Sub 70 clubs?
Yep. Only clubs I’ve had that didn’t last a season in my bag. But it was more on me, not them. I got the 699 pro irons which is in that players distance category. Hollow bodied injected with foam to increase ball speed.

I knew the spin numbers would be decreased but they performed to inconsistent for me and took away all the confidence I had in my ball striking.

For example say I had 175 yds to a pin and pulled 7 iron. There were some times I hit it good and high on the face, and the ball would knuckle off the club face and I’d end up 20 yards long of the green. So every time I stepped up to the ball I’d try to punch shots into greens because on the off chance I hit one really pure I’d be dead over.

The company is great and if I could do it again I’d try their more traditional style cavity backs. But once I made the decision to change I hit the ZX7’s and fell in love with them. Luckily I was standard length lie and loft so I went to wrx and found a used set for $850. Half of the clubs had the wrappers on them.