Free Upgrade to Win10

InsideTheParker

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It seems to be still available. Before I get started, I wanted to ask if there are any things I should be aware of, look out for. Be aware that you are addressing a nearly computer-illiterate person. TIA!!!!!
 

DamageTrain

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I had a laptop with Windows 10 and a slow hard drive. I only used it for business meetings every few weeks at most. Win10 used to force upgrades on you and would sometimes take hours to upgrade. In my experience if the machine had been off for several weeks it would see the updates as "overdue" and would just start to install the updates without regard to time of day or without requiring my assent. At several meetings I just had to work on my phone as the laptop installed updates that would literally take multiple hours. Enraging.

However, I have now upgraded to an SSD (solid-state drive). It is fast and the updates are less odious as a result. Also, I make sure to warm up the machine prior to meetings and install updates preemptively. Because of the faster hard-drive and Microsoft being less heavy handed with the updates, I no longer hate Windows 10 and will likely upgrade my primary computer within the year.

Ultimately, if you have a slow hard-drive the operating system may drive you crazy. SSDs are much less expensive now and it's worth upgrading.
 

The_Powa_of_Seiji_Ozawa

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I know some will disagree, but I despise Windows 10. I hate the forced upgrades, I hate the interface, I hate the personal data collection (I know it happens anyways, but Windows adds a whole 'nother layer of it). If you never used Windows before I guess some of this isn't an issue. But coming from earlier versions and being under their hoods, I don't care for navigating the new one.

If you are not wanting to use an unsupported Windows 7, an alternative to Windows 10 would be to use Windows 8.1 with the classic shell addon (there is a software fork of the original classic shell). Win 8.1 will continue to be supported for some years and, once you can set it up to bypass the stupid Metro Interface stuff, it's not bad.
 

24JoshuaPoint

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Yea i had hoped to like 10 after a while but at this point i don't think i'll ever adapt to it. I still have unsupported 7s at home.
 

gtmtnbiker

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Jul 15, 2005
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I don’t recall any ads or pushing products. It can do some intelligent stuff like setup reminders based on your email if you use the mail client. My favorite is putting your hotel and airline tickets automatically in calendar. it has alot of little stuff like remembering recent docs you opened, OneDrive intégration, and much more.
 

wade boggs chicken dinner

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Mar 26, 2005
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One troubling thing I read about Win10 is that it's intrusive, always making suggestions, pushing products, etc. I wish I'd copied that, but I didn't. Anyway, an OS that intrudes with ads is the last thing I want. Does it do that?

Edit: apparently it is true, but that stuff can mostly be disabled: https://www.howtogeek.com/269331/how-to-disable-all-of-windows-10s-built-in-advertising/
If you use anything Google, you've already gone down that road but to an exponential degree.

At the end of the day, MSFT is way better than Google as MSFT (right now) is still a software company but Google is an ad company,
 

Joe Sixpack

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I have so many doubts about Win10 that I am looking into Linux. Here's an article that describes a way to have both Linux and Win7 on your computer. I am interested, but scared of this kind of maneuver.
https://www.howtogeek.com/509508/how-to-upgrade-from-windows-7-to-linux/
It's a great way to try out Linux and still be able to go back to Windows as needed. I've done it before. The only downside is you have to allocate part of your hard drive space to only Linux (windows won't be able to see it) so you need a big enough drive. For example, if you have a 500gb drive you could allocate 100gb to Linux. Windows would now see it as a 400gb drive.

When you power on the machine it asks you which one you want to boot into.

My wife is not a tech person at all and she ran Linux Mint for awhile and liked it better than Windows (although in the end she finally switched to a MacBook). I would recommend Linux Mint as a good out of the box, user friendly, "it just works" type distribution if you're new to Linux.

What wbcd says about Google vs Microsoft is true. I've eliminated about 80% of Google from my life at this point but some of it is unavoidable as an android user. I agree with him in the sense that I trust Microsoft with my info way more than I trust Google.

There's also W10Privacy that disables a lot of the Windows tracking stuff - learn more about it here: https://proprivacy.com/privacy-service/review/w10privacy

I recommend using startpage.com for web searches instead of Google if you are concerned about some of this stuff.
 
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InsideTheParker

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Ultimately, if you have a slow hard-drive the operating system may drive you crazy. SSDs are much less expensive now and it's worth upgrading.
I just reread the Win7 End of Support info and found this: "While it is possible to install Windows 10 on your older device, it is not recommended. "
So I have pretty much decided to get a new Win10 laptop with SSD. I'll keep my old Inspiron 1764 to do stuff that doesn't involve the internet, like my photos and financial records, etc., at least until I feel comfortable with Win10. Maybe I'll get up the nerve to install Linux on it, once I have the new laptop for insurance. I appreciate all the replies in this thread; they were helpful.
If folks have any advice for me re laptops, I'd love to hear it. Right now I'm inclined to get the Dell 15 5000, just the result of a process of elimination, although I'd prefer a keyboard without the number keys on the side, which I don't use. The new laptops don't seem to have CD slots, apparently.
 

DamageTrain

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So I have pretty much decided to get a new Win10 laptop with SSD.
Sometimes it is the right time to get a new laptop, that's for sure.

But do keep in mind that to purchase a high-quality laptop-ready SSD is only about $80. So if you have enough memory in your laptop, and your processor is not super slow, it's almost definitely the hard drive that is going to have the biggest effect on Win 10 speed. I just upgraded a 10-year old machine with an SSD (it has Windows 8), and I'm quite happy with the speed. You may want some tech support to help open up the box to install the drive (though the youtube videos make it easy), clone the drive (free software from Samsung) or to install Windows 10 fresh (in which case you won't have your fallback data on your fallback machine). Ultimately, there are times when a new laptop is the right choice (keyboard, charging port, or screen is wearing down, or the CPU is just too slow). But I just wanted to note that you might be able to save some money and carbon footprint with just the SSD upgrade.
 

Couperin47

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I just reread the Win7 End of Support info and found this: "While it is possible to install Windows 10 on your older device, it is not recommended. "
So I have pretty much decided to get a new Win10 laptop with SSD. I'll keep my old Inspiron 1764 to do stuff that doesn't involve the internet, like my photos and financial records, etc., at least until I feel comfortable with Win10. Maybe I'll get up the nerve to install Linux on it, once I have the new laptop for insurance. I appreciate all the replies in this thread; they were helpful.
If folks have any advice for me re laptops, I'd love to hear it. Right now I'm inclined to get the Dell 15 5000, just the result of a process of elimination, although I'd prefer a keyboard without the number keys on the side, which I don't use. The new laptops don't seem to have CD slots, apparently.
If you use and want a CD drive, here's the latest suggestions on those still available, also there are a lot of just recently discontinued models, many of which are still in stores and online that offer them, like the Thinkpad E570 models that included them:
https://www.technobezz.com/best/best-laptops-cddvd-drive-buy/
 

crow216

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Jul 15, 2005
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For daily use, there is absolutely no question that Macs are a superior product to me. For professional (non-tech world) use, windows still offers the better experience to me. For gaming, windows.

My parents constantly have troubles with their windows computers but don't know how to sort them out. Switching them to macs was a godsend. All they want to do is browse the internet and play stupid games. Virtually no reason for them to worry about viruses and the susceptibility that comes with windows.
 

InsideTheParker

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I have not used CDs or DVDs in years. You can always get one of those external ones that use USB to connect.
Neither have I, in my computer, so I'm not sure I care all that much, but I was struck by it. Back in the day, I transferred lots of my LPs to the computer, then burned them to disc, but I am done with that, I think. Anyway, the external ones are only about $35.00.
For daily use, there is absolutely no question that Macs are a superior product to me. For professional (non-tech world) use, windows still offers the better experience to me. For gaming, windows.

My parents constantly have troubles with their windows computers but don't know how to sort them out. Switching them to macs was a godsend. All they want to do is browse the internet and play stupid games. Virtually no reason for them to worry about viruses and the susceptibility that comes with windows.
I am very drawn to Macs, but friends tell me there will be a shock going to them from Windows. I would like to be able to still use Windows office, because my husband and I share Excel files, etc., but I think that's possible on Macs, yeah?
 

crow216

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Neither have I, in my computer, so I'm not sure I care all that much, but I was struck by it. Back in the day, I transferred lots of my LPs to the computer, then burned them to disc, but I am done with that, I think. Anyway, the external ones are only about $35.00.
I am very drawn to Macs, but friends tell me there will be a shock going to them from Windows. I would like to be able to still use Windows office, because my husband and I share Excel files, etc., but I think that's possible on Macs, yeah?
It's very possible, but there are minor differences you will need to adjust to. Unless you are using macros and VBA in excel though, it is almost identical. Word feels exactly the same to me. To me, the biggest shock moving to an mac was the simplicity of it and not having a right-click (just tap with two fingers on the trackpad). Install a program? Just drag it to the application folder. Uninstall a program? Just drag the icon to the recycle bin. Having wifi issues? Just type wifi in the search bar. Want to put an icon in your doc? Just drag it there and pin it. It's all very very very practical and easy. There isn't much that requires you to jump through hoops.

At home, I have 2 windows PCs and 1 macbook pro. The macbook pro is better in all possible ways for everyday use. If not for gaming, I would probably switch entirely over to mac. At work, I don't think I could ever use a mac.
 

HriniakPosterChild

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I am very drawn to Macs, but friends tell me there will be a shock going to them from Windows. I would like to be able to still use Windows office, because my husband and I share Excel files, etc., but I think that's possible on Macs, yeah?
If you have someone who can help you when you get stuck, you could be flying on a Mac in less than a week. Mrs. HPC was very reluctant to switch at first, and she benefited from being able to ask me stuff.

I got one for work many years ago, and even though the HPC family fortune was made from my writing code for Windows, I would not choose to go back.

People here will likely be willing to offer assistance. We got OJ over the hump a few years ago. You might PM her and see if she could rate the degree of difficulty switching platforms.
 

InsideTheParker

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@crow216 :Why couldn't you use a Mac at work? What functions would be missing?
@HriniakPosterChild, I only know one person who has a Mac, and she can't help because it was set up for her, and she knows nothing but how to browse and a few other things. My husband is a Windows guy and is a bit opposed to the move, so I would be bugging you guys. (And OJ isn't around anymore.)
 

HriniakPosterChild

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Oh, my. Sorry, I didn't see her say goodbye.

I'll do whatever I can to help you if you want to try out a Mac. "Bug" me in PM's or start a new thread in this forum, and I'll bet more people jump in with answers.

Apple will do a session of online handholding for free if you like. And they have free classes if you happen to be close to an Apple Store.

And if you buy directly from them, they'll let you bring it back for a full refund within 14 days if you are dissatisfied with your purchase. I think they'll sit with you for the initial setup, too, but I've never taken advantage of that.

(Apple pays me a very small fee for these kind words. I assure you it's nothing of consequence.)
 

gtmtnbiker

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Jul 15, 2005
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To me, the biggest shock moving to an mac was the simplicity of it and not having a right-click (just tap with two fingers on the trackpad). Having wifi issues? Just type wifi in the search bar. Want to put an icon in your doc? Just drag it there and pin it.
These things are also available in W10.

It's funny how I used a Mac in college in the late 80s and I had to switch to a PC/Windows in the corporate world because no one used Macs back then. Now, it's much more common.
 

crow216

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Jul 15, 2005
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@crow216 :Why couldn't you use a Mac at work? What functions would be missing?
@HriniakPosterChild, I only know one person who has a Mac, and she can't help because it was set up for her, and she knows nothing but how to browse and a few other things. My husband is a Windows guy and is a bit opposed to the move, so I would be bugging you guys. (And OJ isn't around anymore.)
You can. We have 16 people on my team, 2 use macs and many have tried. The issue is that many of our macros that were built w/ windows office simply break or are unreliable on macs. Work sometimes, other times don't. There are still occasional compatibility issues and formatting issues that pop up here and there as well.

The biggest thing for me personally is that my brain is programmed with lightning quick reflexes in excel, word, and ppt. The second I open a mac and attempt to use all of my keyboard shortcuts, my brain breaks.

These things are also available in W10.

It's funny how I used a Mac in college in the late 80s and I had to switch to a PC/Windows in the corporate world because no one used Macs back then. Now, it's much more common.
Simplicity is natural in macOS. It is accidental in Windows. You modified my post to remove the other examples that windows makes painstaking. Blink while you're installing a program on windows to play MP4 files and you'll accidentally install 9 searchbar add-ons and 6 trial versions of Norton antivirus. My mom calls me once a month to ask me whether its okay that her computer is alerting her there is a threat only to find out windows just needed to update its virus definitions....because windows still needs virus scanners. And spam removers. and all that bullshit. The bottom line is that if you are browsing the internet, doing some photo and video stuff, watching movies and netflix, using non-expert level office stuff, macs are just plain better.

I use ethernet on my work laptop, once a week it just doesn't pick up a connection and I need to go into my adapter settings to reset. Only, I figured out that I need to disable the adapter first, then reset, and then it works. Macs just don't have those sorts of problems. Are they perfect? No way. I can list shit that bothers me with macs. That's why I use both.
 

begranter

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Jul 9, 2007
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I bought an Lenovo laptop to be able to play some games on a while back and the timing seems to have put me into a weird purgatory where I'm stuck on Windows 8.1. I tried using the key to register so I could upgrade, but Windows says the key does not exist even though it is in the BiOS and on the label on the bottom of the laptop. Anyone have any ideas how to move from 8.1 to 10 without buying a new license?

The bottom line is that if you are browsing the internet, doing some photo and video stuff, watching movies and netflix, using non-expert level office stuff, macs are just plain better.
I find it really interesting this is the use case you're going with as pro-Mac. Doing design work and the like, makes sense. You're all in on the apple ecosystem with your phone, watch, etc, I get it. But if your user is a tech novice and just wants to browse the web, do e-mail, basic photo editing, and watch videos, a chromebook fits the mold at a much more palatable price point.
 

MuzzyField

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I bought an Lenovo laptop to be able to play some games on a while back and the timing seems to have put me into a weird purgatory where I'm stuck on Windows 8.1. I tried using the key to register so I could upgrade, but Windows says the key does not exist even though it is in the BiOS and on the label on the bottom of the laptop. Anyone have any ideas how to move from 8.1 to 10 without buying a new license?


I find it really interesting this is the use case you're going with as pro-Mac. Doing design work and the like, makes sense. You're all in on the apple ecosystem with your phone, watch, etc, I get it. But if your user is a tech novice and just wants to browse the web, do e-mail, basic photo editing, and watch videos, a chromebook fits the mold at a much more palatable price point.
Why bring Mac into the post... you can Chromebook and Lenovo all you want. Just get their support to get you from 8.1 to 10. As someone that uses both ecosystems in depth, once I transferred my non-tech save family members to Mac's my phone now longer rings... their stuff "just works!"
 

HriniakPosterChild

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I bought an Lenovo laptop to be able to play some games on a while back and the timing seems to have put me into a weird purgatory where I'm stuck on Windows 8.1. I tried using the key to register so I could upgrade, but Windows says the key does not exist even though it is in the BiOS and on the label on the bottom of the laptop. Anyone have any ideas how to move from 8.1 to 10 without buying a new license?
Does the key that Belarc Advisor reports agree with the label?

https://download.cnet.com/Belarc-Advisor/3000-2094_4-10007277.html

FYI, I once bought an Acer desktop computer from a 3rd party seller on Amazon (Adorama camera) that was a counterfeit. I never tried to see about the legitimacy of the Windows license, but the Acer website said the S/N was for a different piece of hardware manufactured many years earlier in Mexico. Any chance your Lenovo is not completely kosher?