Euro 2020 day 2 game thread: Waiting for Lukaku

LeftyTG

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my wife and I are watching this. She is a paramedic. She said modern best practice is to not extricate and to keep working the patient for up to 40 minutes, even if it is in front of the crowd.
 

Tuff Ghost

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I am sick to my stomach. Did he just collapse or was there a collision? I had left the room when he went down.
 

LeftyTG

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So his heart stopped. Where is an ambulance?
My wife is a paramedic. She is an on field paramedic for a major D1 football school with several years of experience. She is watching this with me. What they are doing is the best medical practice. It used to be that they would extract the patient ASAP, but research has shown that any gaps in CPR have major consequences. Best practice is to continually do CPR, even if on the field, up to 40 minutes. There isn't anything else they would do in an ambulance. It isn't worth the interruption. I see now they've loaded him - she is hopeful that means they've gotten a heartbeat back.
 

cromulence

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I don't ever wanna watch that replay again. Watching it live, the way his face looked will stick with me for the rest of my life. Really hope he makes it.
 

johnmd20

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I know players have collapsed and died before on the court or field, but I have never seen CRP being administered like that, live, and I've certainly never seen a defib being used.

That was horrifying. I really, really hope they found a pulse.
 

Preacher

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My wife is a paramedic. She is an on field paramedic for a major D1 football school with several years of experience. She is watching this with me. What they are doing is the best medical practice. It used to be that they would extract the patient ASAP, but research has shown that any gaps in CPR have major consequences. Best practice is to continually do CPR, even if on the field, up to 40 minutes. There isn't anything else they would do in an ambulance. It isn't worth the interruption. I see now they've loaded him - she is hopeful that means they've gotten a heartbeat back.
Based on what your wife said, would they have moved him after roughly 5-10 minutes if they didn’t get a pulse?
 

CSteinhardt

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The park is only a few hundred meters from the hospital I'd expect them to take him to, so at least that part will be very quick. So I assume that treating him on the pitch means that it was the recommended procedure, and hopefully taking him off means that he's stable enough to transport.
 

coremiller

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I was at the Fabrice Muamba match at White Hart Lane in 2012 (one of two Spurs matches I've ever attended). It was awful. I mostly remember being confused because I hadn't seen Muamba collapse (IIRC he had been away from the ball) and so I had no idea what was happening, and obviously in the stadium there are no updates or narration like there is on TV, but you could tell something was very wrong.
 

LeftyTG

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Based on what your wife said, would they have moved him after roughly 5-10 minutes if they didn’t get a pulse?
I asked her many of the questions that have been asked here. She said it isn't that they can't do CPR during transport. The issue is that stopping CPR while they turn him on his side, get the board/stretcher under him, and positioned - just those few seconds of stopping CPR is enough to have dramatic negative effects. She said as a field medic, there are about 10 things they are looking for with a cardiac arrest in a pre-hospital setting ("h's" and "t's"). She said they have medications and tools they use trying to address those and hope it is one of them. She was extremely encouraged that they took him off after about 15 minutes of work. She said that it certainly appeared to be a well run operation and this scenario is certainly something they planned for and drilled. That they took him off indicated strongly to her that they got back a pulse.
 

LeftyTG

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I showed my wife the picture and she is overjoyed. The mask he is wearing can only be used when he is breathing on his own. She assumed he was intubated. He is not. He has an IV. She said they must have gotten him back quickly and then were working to stabilize him, which is very good news.

You are supposed to have 6 people doing 6 jobs in this setting. They had the 6 people and it seems they did their job perfectly.
 

67YAZ

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My reference point for for these events is still Reggie Lewis, so I hope Eriksen gets the best medical opinions possible and comes back slowly, if not retiring out of precaution.
 

Jeff Frye's Face Mask

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A second location.
Based on what your wife said, would they have moved him after roughly 5-10 minutes if they didn’t get a pulse?
Usually you try and get some degree of stabilization before moving.

I’m only catching up on this now but I see pics on Twitter suggesting he was moving and alert when taken off the pitch.
Usually in this type of patient population, it is a shockable arrhythmia (the AED can literally zap the patient out of it) and once it is broken, it is not uncommon to have people wake up/respond/etc.
 

Preacher

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I asked her many of the questions that have been asked here. She said it isn't that they can't do CPR during transport. The issue is that stopping CPR while they turn him on his side, get the board/stretcher under him, and positioned - just those few seconds of stopping CPR is enough to have dramatic negative effects. She said as a field medic, there are about 10 things they are looking for with a cardiac arrest in a pre-hospital setting ("h's" and "t's"). She said they have medications and tools they use trying to address those and hope it is one of them. She was extremely encouraged that they took him off after about 15 minutes of work. She said that it certainly appeared to be a well run operation and this scenario is certainly something they planned for and drilled. That they took him off indicated strongly to her that they got back a pulse.
Thanks. That’s great info and certainly encouraging (to go along with the pic posted above). That was scary to watch live.
 

Vinho Tinto

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I know he’s not out of the woods, but I just breathed a massive sigh of relief after reading that tweet from UEFA. I’ve been experiencing flashbacks to watching Miki Feher collapsing and my anxiety has been climbing since Eriksen went down.
 

Kremlin Watcher

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Usually you try and get some degree of stabilization before moving.


Usually in this type of patient population, it is a shockable arrhythmia (the AED can literally zap the patient out of it) and once it is broken, it is not uncommon to have people wake up/respond/etc.
I am clearly mistaken, but I thought AED usage and chest compressions are not compatible. I thought if there is no heartbeat, you do CPR because an AED only helps when the patient is fibrillating, not to re-start a stopped heart. And if there is a fibrillating heart, you don't do chest compressions because that is dangerous to a beating heart. Could one of you medical nerds set me straight?