7/19/21 @ Blue Jays - Pivetta vs Stripling - 7:07 pm

Jed Zeppelin

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Aug 23, 2008
43,909
I’m now surprised and disappointed when a ball up the middle doesn’t go straight to a fielder. Stupid shift.
 

StupendousMan

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Jul 20, 2005
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Far above the Earth's surface is a layer of ionized gas in the Earth's upper atmosphere. This region of ionized gas (in which some atoms have lost a few of their electrons, so charged particles are mixed with the usual neutral atoms) reflects radio waves. During the day, the solar wind pushes this layer down, so it lies only some 90 km above the surface. At night, the region rises to much greater altitudes, up to 150 or 160 km above the surface. Radio signals can bounce off this higher layer and "skip" around the curved surface of the Earth, making some radio stations detectable at very large distances.
 

Ferm Sheller

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Mar 5, 2007
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Far above the Earth's surface is a layer of ionized gas in the Earth's upper atmosphere. This region of ionized gas (in which some atoms have lost a few of their electrons, so charged particles are mixed with the usual neutral atoms) reflects radio waves. During the day, the solar wind pushes this layer down, so it lies only some 90 km above the surface. At night, the region rises to much greater altitudes, up to 150 or 160 km above the surface. Radio signals can bounce off this higher layer and "skip" around the curved surface of the Earth, making some radio stations detectable at very large distances.
Got you covered: http://radio.garden/listen/sever-fm/hZPmAzs0
 

canyoubelieveit

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Apr 8, 2006
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Far above the Earth's surface is a layer of ionized gas in the Earth's upper atmosphere. This region of ionized gas (in which some atoms have lost a few of their electrons, so charged particles are mixed with the usual neutral atoms) reflects radio waves. During the day, the solar wind pushes this layer down, so it lies only some 90 km above the surface. At night, the region rises to much greater altitudes, up to 150 or 160 km above the surface. Radio signals can bounce off this higher layer and "skip" around the curved surface of the Earth, making some radio stations detectable at very large distances.
Thank you for this, much appreciated
 

Don Buddin's GS

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Far above the Earth's surface is a layer of ionized gas in the Earth's upper atmosphere. This region of ionized gas (in which some atoms have lost a few of their electrons, so charged particles are mixed with the usual neutral atoms) reflects radio waves. During the day, the solar wind pushes this layer down, so it lies only some 90 km above the surface. At night, the region rises to much greater altitudes, up to 150 or 160 km above the surface. Radio signals can bounce off this higher layer and "skip" around the curved surface of the Earth, making some radio stations detectable at very large distances.
I listened to the Celts win the NBA Championship in 1981 on WBZ in the parking lot of the Sheraton Southfield where I was living for 6 weeks when Group W Radio transferred me from Pittsburgh to Detroit. The NBA playoffs were tape delayed back then and there was NFW I could stay up until 2:00am watching them and not be totally useless at work the next day. Johnny Most and WBZ helped solve my dilemma.
 
May 18, 2021
517
I really became a diehard Sox fan after we moved from Maine to NJ when I was 12. Listened to a Connecticut am station on a boom box under the covers, could barely hear what was happening through the static until late, late at night. Remember my Dad telling me that it had something to do with the ionosphere.
I remember discovering all these baseball broadcasts I could pick up on the clear channels. In Cleveland, WWWE, there was this sports talker names Pete Franklin who was obnoxious as all hell, but I loved him, because he would constantly tell the listeners how much he hated the Yankees. I was so disillusioned when he moved to NYC, and went to work for WFAN and all of a sudden he loved the Yankees.
 

nvalvo

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Jul 16, 2005
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Rogers Park
Dunno if it's been said yet, but damn the lights in Buffalo suck.
The Jays reportedly upgraded them last year to meet MLB standards, but I think the good stuff is *very expensive.*

I heard Travis Shaw tell an interviewer that that was why he hit better at the major league level than he had in the minors.
 

Harry Hooper

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Jan 4, 2002
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Typo aside, I agree. Which is why it's so infuriating how many of his cards I pull whenever I buy any baseball cards. It's insane.
That ties into that HR list nvalvo posted. Seemed like I got a TON of Ron Fairly cards last century.