6/24 Sox vs. Sox

Jed Zeppelin

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Aug 23, 2008
36,108
Might have had a force at 3rd but Moncada had made a move toward the ball and wasn’t in position.
 

InsideTheParker

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Jul 15, 2005
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Pioneer Valley
“Hitterish”, another Eckism.
This word is old, but Eck's use, which seems to mean "determined to try to hit the ball" seems to be different from the traditional, which implies an ability to hit the ball:
Turns out the Recency Illusion is just as pervasive in baseball as it is in other fields of human endeavor. As the New Dickson Baseball Dictionary points out, hitterish was often used by Dizzy Dean (1910-1974), the pitcher-turned-broadcaster who was renowned for his eccentric use of language. And it goes back even further than that, to the Babe Ruth era if not earlier.
Though I haven't found a directly attested use of hitterish by Babe Ruth, it has often been attributed to him, as in this reminscence by Ford Frick in Robert Creamer's 1974 book Babe: The Legend Comes to Life:
Sometimes before a game he'd say, "I feel hitterish today. I'm due to hit one."
http://itre.cis.upenn.edu/~myl/languagelog/archives/003261.html
 

Al Zarilla

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Dec 8, 2005
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San Andreas Fault
This word is old, but Eck's use, which seems to mean "determined to try to hit the ball" seems to be different from the traditional, which implies an ability to hit the ball:

http://itre.cis.upenn.edu/~myl/languagelog/archives/003261.html
I thought hitterish meant overeager to hit, or swing the bat. Anyway, Dizzy Dean, mentioned there, was a lot of fun to listen to, with his own version of the language, both English and baseball. “He slud into third base.” Every first baseman was the big first sacker and every second baseman the little second sacker. He would have loved Pedroia. I didn’t realize he died at just 64 years of age.