2020 NCAA Football

RedOctober3829

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All but four LSU offensive linemen are in quarantine after they either tested positive for COVID-19 or were determined to have high-risk exposure to the coronavirus, multiple sources told The Advocate on Wednesday.

Players who test positive for the coronavirus must isolate for at least 10 days after their positive test, according to Southeastern Conference COVID-19 protocols. Their symptoms must disappear for at least 24 hours before they can return to practice. Individuals with high-risk exposure must quarantine for 14 days.

 

HriniakPosterChild

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Jul 6, 2006
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All but four LSU offensive linemen are in quarantine after they either tested positive for COVID-19 or were determined to have high-risk exposure to the coronavirus, multiple sources told The Advocate on Wednesday.
Back to the quote in post #90: Speaking Tuesday with Vice President Pence, LSU Coach Ed Orgeron declared, “We need football.”
“We need to play. This state needs it; this country needs it,” he said as Pence applauded.

And now from your article: "We feel comfortable," Orgeron said last week. "The guys that did get sick, most of them are asymptomatic. They got quarantine and stuff like that. But we didn’t have guys that were really sick and had to take to the hospital or anything, so I think our guys are getting used to it.”
 

bigq

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Jul 15, 2005
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Back to the quote in post #90: Speaking Tuesday with Vice President Pence, LSU Coach Ed Orgeron declared, “We need football.”
“We need to play. This state needs it; this country needs it,” he said as Pence applauded.

And now from your article: "We feel comfortable," Orgeron said last week. "The guys that did get sick, most of them are asymptomatic. They got quarantine and stuff like that. But we didn’t have guys that were really sick and had to take to the hospital or anything, so I think our guys are getting used to it.”
Get used to it indeed. Apparently the players are nothing more than livestock. I guess it’s not surprising and this is not a new development but goodness gracious doesn’t big college football feel dirty.
 

jon abbey

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Haha, their best season in a century.

I have said it before I'm sure but my class ('88) was the first class ever in division 1 (at the time) that the football team was winless for all four years, 0-38 or 0-39 I think.
 

MuzzyField

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Haha, their best season in a century.

I have said it before I'm sure but my class ('88) was the first class ever in division 1 (at the time) that the football team was winless for all four years, 0-38 or 0-39 I think.
Ohio thanks you!

The Bobcats were horrible for my four year stint in Athens, but not THAT bad.

After "peaking" with a 4-6-1 record my freshman year, the team followed up with a 2-9, 1-10, and 1-10 trifecta of suck that had us among the "Bottom Ten" programs, but we could never quite hit rock bottom and wear the crown of ineptitude thanks to you guys.

We were the UTEP of the 80's.
 

jon abbey

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I actually rooted for the football team to keep losing because I thought if they ever won, the fencing team which I was part of might lose. We lost twice freshman year and went undefeated the three years after that, 3rd/2nd/1st/1st at NCAAs, starting a run of ten straight top 2 national finishes.
 

Ale Xander

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Oct 31, 2013
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No fans at Universtity of Kansas football (and other sports) in September, per Chancellor Girod. AD Jeff Long wants games in October.

 

Mystic Merlin

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Really loving hearing the likes of noted epidemiologist and physician David Pollack opine on the COVID risks. If you’re ‘young and healthy’, you’re low risk! No worries.

I mean, what the hell is this? I get that Reece Davis and many of these other analysts can’t conceive of a fall without college football, but get a fucking grip. There aren’t ‘two sides’ to the medical debate, young people aren’t safe from this thing, and none of you have demonstrated any ability to discuss the issue intelligently.
 
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DeadlySplitter

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Oct 20, 2015
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Virginia - Virginia Tech postponed.

I guess we've seen the major leagues be mostly responsible, postpone for any single positive test and contract trace well, and the NFL has a chance to get through a season. College? I don't see it.

 

Time to Mo Vaughn

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Mar 24, 2008
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Virginia - Virginia Tech postponed.

I guess we've seen the major leagues be mostly responsible, postpone for any single positive test and contract trace well, and the NFL has a chance to get through a season. College? I don't see it.

NFL has their first positive test. We'll find out tomorrow if they postpone.
 

Pablo's TB Lover

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How fast would you run out of the building if your doctor referred you to a proctologist, and it is an Ed Orgeron lookalike/soundalike who greets you in the examining room?
 

cornwalls@6

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Apr 23, 2010
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How fast would you run out of the building if your doctor referred you to a proctologist, and it is an Ed Orgeron lookalike/soundalike who greets you in the examining room?
I'm a 56 year old guy, with a bad knee. I have never spent a day in my life having good foot speed. I'm pretty sure I'd surpass McCourty's number on that pick six in Buffalo a couple of years ago.
 

SoxJox

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Much of the commentary centers around the decision making by conference presidents, school administrations, athletic directors, and coaches. Of course, this is where most of the commentary should be directed because decisions ultimately are placed in their hands. But there is an additional, non-political influence and it is one that likely has a less visible yet very powerful effect: the seemingly massive collection of parents and players who support playing. If avoiding loss of TV and other revenues is a by-product of this milieu of influence, we can't point a finger simply at $$ as the deciding factor.
 

SoxJox

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By unanimous vote, Big Ten reinstates fall football with a schedule starting Oct. 23-24; what changed?

The news comes roughly a month and a week after the COCP originally voted to postpone the fall sports season because of the coronavirus pandemic on Aug. 11. So what changed?

For starters, the pushback from people within and outside of the conference was immense. But the real game-changer, so to speak, is the availability of rapid turnaround COVID-19 antigen testing.

“The Big Ten will require student-athletes, coaches, trainers and other individuals that are on the field for all practices and games to undergo daily antigen testing,” a statement from the Big Ten said.

"Test results must be completed and recorded prior to each practice or game. Student-athletes who test positive for the coronavirus through point of contact (POC) daily testing would require a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test to confirm the result of the POC test.

Daily testing will start for everyone associated with each Big Ten program on Sept. 30.
Elsewhere, Wisconsin athletic director Barry Alvarez, speaking Wednesday morning on the Big Ten Network, said each Big Ten team will play eight regular-season games plus one game during the Big Ten’s championship week of December 18-19.

During championship week, the Big Ten East champ will play the Big Ten West champ, Big Ten East No. 2 will face Big Ten West No. 2, and each remaining division seed will play.

“We will play eight games, plus one very unique champions' week where the teams from the East and West will match up and play one another, two versus two, three versus three, four versus four, etc., with the championship game being played at the end of that week,” Alvarez said.

The testing guidelines:

“The Big Ten Conference will use data provided by each Chief Infection Officer (CInO) to make decisions about the continuation of practice and competition, as determined by team positivity rate and population positivity rate,” the conference said, "based on a seven-day rolling average:
  • Team positivity rate (number of positive tests divided by total number of tests administered): Green 0-2%; Orange 2-5%; Red >5%
  • Population positivity rate (number of positive individuals divided by total population at risk): Green 0-3.5%; Orange 3.5-7.5% ;Red >7.5%
"Decisions to alter or halt practice and competition will be based on the following scenarios:
  • Green / Green and Green / Orange: Team continues with normal practice and competition.
  • Orange / Orange and Orange / Red: Team must proceed with caution and enhance COVID-19 prevention (alter practice and meeting schedule, consider viability of continuing with scheduled competition).
  • Red / Red: Team must stop regular practice and competition for a minimum of seven days and reassess metrics until improved."
 

joe dokes

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Jul 18, 2005
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Much of the commentary centers around the decision making by conference presidents, school administrations, athletic directors, and coaches. Of course, this is where most of the commentary should be directed because decisions ultimately are placed in their hands. But there is an additional, non-political influence and it is one that likely has a less visible yet very powerful effect: the seemingly massive collection of parents and players who support playing. If avoiding loss of TV and other revenues is a by-product of this milieu of influence, we can't point a finger simply at $$ as the deciding factor.
The students who want to attend classes in person, however, can go straight to the back of the grievance line.
 

terrynever

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So the Big Ten avoided all the September uncertainty experienced by early starters, polished up its testing protocols, and will start its season just in time to participate in the playoffs and bowl season. Cynics will have a field day with the flip-flop but I applaud the conference for its calculated hesitancy.
 

RedOctober3829

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Jul 19, 2005
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Much of the commentary centers around the decision making by conference presidents, school administrations, athletic directors, and coaches. Of course, this is where most of the commentary should be directed because decisions ultimately are placed in their hands. But there is an additional, non-political influence and it is one that likely has a less visible yet very powerful effect: the seemingly massive collection of parents and players who support playing. If avoiding loss of TV and other revenues is a by-product of this milieu of influence, we can't point a finger simply at $$ as the deciding factor.
It shouldn't matter what the players and the parents say though. It should only matter if it's medically safe for them to do so. The ones who are playing have chosen to play football over the medical risks. We know what they prioritized. The Big Ten and Pac-12 chose health and safety. If there is new medical information available to them that swayed their minds in thinking that there is minimal risk to playing, that's great. Go play. But if it's the same risks and they are playing anyway, they are succumbing to outside pressures. Sometimes, tough decisions have to be made and it takes guts to stick by them. If outside pressures make the university presidents and chancellors change their minds, then that reflects badly on them.
 

Ale Xander

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It shouldn't matter what the players and the parents say though. It should only matter if it's medically safe for them to do so. The ones who are playing have chosen to play football over the medical risks. We know what they prioritized. The Big Ten and Pac-12 chose health and safety. If there is new medical information available to them that swayed their minds in thinking that there is minimal risk to playing, that's great. Go play. But if it's the same risks and they are playing anyway, they are succumbing to outside pressures. Sometimes, tough decisions have to be made and it takes guts to stick by them. If outside pressures make the university presidents and chancellors change their minds, then that reflects badly on them.
perfectly said
 

SoxJox

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Not arguing at all against medical risks being the primary factor, but I do believe the parents and players are operating from a belief that proper protocols are being put in place. From what I've read, the B1G is putting in place a robust and aggressive system. And, you must have missed the part in the article about, "...the real game-changer, so to speak, is the availability of rapid turnaround COVID-19 antigen testing" that helps to inform and enforce those protocols That seems like a "change" and not "outside pressure", though to be sure, such pressure is out there. But from where I sit and what I know, which is far from the complete story, correlation of outside pressure and change in decision does not equal to causation.
 

RedOctober3829

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Not arguing at all against medical risks being the primary factor, but I do believe the parents and players are operating from a belief that proper protocols are being put in place. From what I've read, the B1G is putting in place a robust and aggressive system. And, you must have missed the part in the article about, "...the real game-changer, so to speak, is the availability of rapid turnaround COVID-19 antigen testing" that helps to inform and enforce those protocols That seems like a "change" and not "outside pressure", though to be sure, such pressure is out there. But from where I sit and what I know, which is far from the complete story, correlation of outside pressure and change in decision does not equal to causation.
The thing that I believe that has changed their minds is the availability of the daily rapid antigen tests. If they are effective, that is definitely a game changer.

The parents and players are operating from a belief that because they see other conferences playing they think they should be playing as well.
 

Lose Remerswaal

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Not arguing at all against medical risks being the primary factor, but I do believe the parents and players are operating from a belief that proper protocols are being put in place. From what I've read, the B1G is putting in place a robust and aggressive system. And, you must have missed the part in the article about, "...the real game-changer, so to speak, is the availability of rapid turnaround COVID-19 antigen testing" that helps to inform and enforce those protocols That seems like a "change" and not "outside pressure", though to be sure, such pressure is out there. But from where I sit and what I know, which is far from the complete story, correlation of outside pressure and change in decision does not equal to causation.
So they will find out more quickly that players are sick. But they can't find it before they become contagious, so it's still going to spread, right?