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Ortiz on Farrell


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#1 canderson


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Posted 16 July 2013 - 05:53 PM

Ortiz just on MLBN, on JF:

"John Farrell. Unbelievable. Since day 1, he wants to know how his players are doing. He wants to know how we are feeling. When you have your manager coming to you to ask you how you feel, it gets no better. You want to go out there and give 120 percent for that guy."

On the team:

"Everyone is hungry out there, everyone is trying to make things happen."

#2 Rasputin


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Posted 16 July 2013 - 06:25 PM

It's nice to have a manager, not to mention coaches, that actually do their job.



#3 Smiling Joe Hesketh


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Posted 16 July 2013 - 06:54 PM

In the Buser Olney podcast that was mentioned in another thread, Ortiz specifically mentioned the Valentine/Aviles incident in spring training as a huge problem for the team from early on, that they felt that Valentine, by trying to humiliate a veteran player so early on, was completely over his head and not worthy of their respect. He then went on to favorably contrast Farrell to Valentine, showing how much more the players respected Farrell because he respected them.

 

I thought that was most illuminative.



#4 CoRP

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Posted 16 July 2013 - 10:00 PM

Not taking anything away from Farrell but how the fuck doesn't every manager do this? I would rub Papi's belly like the fucking Buddha every day of the week.



#5 HriniakPosterChild

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Posted 16 July 2013 - 10:25 PM

Ortiz just on MLBN, on JF:

"John Farrell. Unbelievable. Since day 1, he wants to know how his players are doing. He wants to know how we are feeling. When you have your manager coming to you to ask you how you feel, it gets no better. You want to go out there and give 120 percent for that guy."

On the team:

"Everyone is hungry out there, everyone is trying to make things happen."

 

I've never seen anyone damn someone with faint praise for someone else, but I thing Ortiz just did that for Bobby Valentine. Really, isn't this a pretty low bar for a boss to clear? 



#6 wutang112878


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Posted 17 July 2013 - 02:09 AM

Not taking anything away from Farrell but how the fuck doesn't every manager do this? I would rub Papi's belly like the fucking Buddha every day of the week.

 

Because they have serious attitude problems or giant egos.  Its like asking why there are divas and every player isnt like Pedroia



#7 Rasputin


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Posted 17 July 2013 - 02:17 AM

Because they have serious attitude problems or giant egos.  Its like asking why there are divas and every player isnt like Pedroia

 

I think it's more like asking "How the fuck do those people get jobs?"

 

I mean, there are thirty MLB managing jobs in an entire world of seven billion people. Is it really that hard to find thirty people who are neither raging asshats nor monstrously incompetent?

 

I mean, I cut managers a lot of slack because there are things that are going on in the clubhouse that we don't know about because they don't tell anyone and rightly so that have an influence on decisions. And I know precisely squat about managing people because the mere thought of doing that makes me want to hurl, but holy fuck do we have a lot of managers these days who are just so fucking terrible?

 

I mean, Bobby Valentine wasn't managing. His coaches weren't coaching. And he just sat there and grinned at us like an ass. Ron Washington is a buffoon. Mike Scioscia and the entire Twins organ-eye-zation display their buffoonery prominently. That sentence was ill done as it would seem to imply that I think Scioscia works for the Twins. I don't, they just do the same ass riddled stuff.

 

I mean, "Bah, fuck it, I'm going to bed."

 

Edit--added an "I mean"


Edited by Rasputin, 17 July 2013 - 02:27 AM.


#8 reggiecleveland


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Posted 17 July 2013 - 01:07 PM

It also isn't as easy as you clowns think it is. The manager has to decide how to use guys and who plays. He is in charge. Having that authority, and being able to have a personal relationship with guys that have had people kiss their asses sine they were 14, is not easy. Farrell is competent and confident enough to be caring without losing control. We saw with Tito the line he walked, and some guys eventually took advantage of the caring side of him.



#9 MyDaughterLovesTomGordon

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Posted 17 July 2013 - 02:20 PM

Agreed with Reggie, but Farrell vs. Valentine is also representative of new management philosophy in the businessworld in general. This idea of the "servant manager" is very popular right now, and basically posits that the manager's job is to make sure all of the workers' needs are being met so that they can be as productive as possible. This is far removed from the top-down schools of management of the past where the manager was an Office Space-style dictator and the workers were just supposed to feel lucky they were employed. 

 

Valentine was brought in to "whip the team into shape," blah, blah, because that old-school management style still holds sway with many, but I think the modern workplace, to which a baseball clubhouse maybe only bears some resemblance, is more and more often demanding a more flexible manager to knows how to get the most out of each worker individually. 

 

That can sound touchy-feeley and new-agey to many, but I think that's where management is heading, in general, as the days of worker-bee drones in the workplace are replaced by days where every worker increasingly has individualized and creative tasks set before them. As players are increasingly specialists and hired for specific roles in better constructed teams, it's going to be more imperative that the manager of the team understands each player's role and communicates it well to that player. 



#10 OilCanShotTupac


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Posted 17 July 2013 - 02:24 PM

Not taking anything away from Farrell but how the fuck doesn't every manager do this? I would rub Papi's belly like the fucking Buddha every day of the week.

 

Managing people is not easy. 

 

It's especially not easy when the manager has 30++ people reporting to him.

 

It's especially not easy when the manager makes 10-20% of the salary of some of the people reporting to him.

 

It's especially not easy when the manager doesn't have the power to hire and fire unilaterally, and the people reporting to him know this.

 

It's especialy not easy when every decision of the manager and his employees is viewed by 30,000+ people in person every night, and by millions more on TV, and is dissected ad nauseam the next day in the papers, on television, on the radio, and by folks on the Internet.

 

I am not surprised that it is a hard job, and that people who do it well are very rare.


Edited by OilCanShotTupac, 17 July 2013 - 02:25 PM.


#11 Sprowl


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Posted 17 July 2013 - 02:36 PM

Farrell seems adept at keeping any personal criticism private. When he needs to explain a personnel decision (demoting Aceves, releasing Mortenson), his mantra is always: the decision was based on performance. If he has any concerns with clubhouse chemistry, he keeps them out of the press.



#12 rembrat


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Posted 17 July 2013 - 02:42 PM

Nothing else to add to this circlejerk but it helps that he physically looks like he can kick your ass. Also, that jaw. That Jaw commands respect.



#13 Ted Cox 4 president

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Posted 17 July 2013 - 03:55 PM

Gil Hodges was not a big guy by today's standards (Baseball Reference says 6'1", 200 lbs.), but I remember reading about how his mere physical presence demanded attention and respect when he was a manager. 



#14 CoRP

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Posted 17 July 2013 - 05:46 PM

Fwiw, I never said managing a baseball team was easy. I said that I think it is pretty simple to demonstrate that one cares about the well-being of one's employees. How every manager doesn't do this is beyond me.

 

But yes, it's a difficult job. That's one of the reasons it pays millions of dollars.



#15 reggiecleveland


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Posted 17 July 2013 - 06:54 PM

Gil Hodges was not a big guy by today's standards (Baseball Reference says 6'1", 200 lbs.), but I remember reading about how his mere physical presence demanded attention and respect when he was a manager. 

Hodges was reportedly inhumanly strong and a tough brawler.






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