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Iphone 5 vs. Samsung S3


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#1 trekfan55


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Posted 19 February 2013 - 12:00 PM

Ok, so it's time to upgrade my phone.  I currently have a Blackberry 9800 and the contract is up.  My provider has offered me either an Iphone5 or an S3 (There are other options but those are my choices in either IOS or Android).

 

Can anyone here help me decide?  There are lots of internet pages with pros and cons but I know some of you have more hands on experience.  By the way, the S3 comes much cheaper and that's why I'm leaning towards that one.

 

Any help is appreciated, thanks.



#2 jayhoz


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Posted 19 February 2013 - 12:41 PM

Do you own any other Apple products and are you heavily invested in iTunes?



#3 trekfan55


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Posted 19 February 2013 - 12:46 PM

There are several iPads in my household, and my daughter has an iPhone.

 

I'm not sure how heavily I am invested in iTunes.  I of course have many apps but the ones I do have are mostly Ipad apps which I would have to buy again for the iphone (such as the one to read and edit office files).

 

I do need my new device to sync with my Outlook (no server issues, just Outlook on my laptop) for contacts, Calendar, Tasks, Notes if that will make a significant difference.



#4 jayhoz


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Posted 19 February 2013 - 12:53 PM

Unless you want to remain in the Apple ecosystem or need a device that is idiot proof then I see no reason not to go GSIII.  Others may not agree  :D



#5 zenter


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Posted 19 February 2013 - 12:59 PM

Ok, so it's time to upgrade my phone.  I currently have a Blackberry 9800 and the contract is up.  My provider has offered me either an Iphone5 or an S3 (There are other options but those are my choices in either IOS or Android).

 

Can anyone here help me decide?  There are lots of internet pages with pros and cons but I know some of you have more hands on experience.  By the way, the S3 comes much cheaper and that's why I'm leaning towards that one.

 

Any help is appreciated, thanks.

 

It all depends on taste. You have Apple and android fans all over the internet acting like this is Lakers/Celtics, but it's not a useful way to think of this stuff.

 

Pros

 

iPhone/iOS: More apps, iCloud, iTunes (if you already use it to manage music/podcasts), simple interface. Hardware build quality is second-to-none, customer service too.

S3/Android: Bigger Super AMOLED screen, much more customizable, multiple keyboard choices, widgets, easy one-click controls, removable battery, microSD card slot, Google integration, swipe contact left/right to SMS/call. Solid build.

 

Cons

 

iPhone/iOS: not very customizable, iTunes, app/folder UI focus. Many clicks to do some basic things (Airplane mode, SMS from call log, etc). LCD IPS screen (I like AMOLED better).

S3/Android: Bloatware, less solid-feeling build, a little busy and too big for some. A lot of people don't like TouchWiz. Samsung support leaves a lot to be desired.

 

I use an iPhone 4 for work and a SGS2 (i777) for me. Battery life is about the same on both with equivalent usage, but YMMV. Go into stores and play with both. Extensively. Hand/pocket feel are important, as is overall generic comfort. Also, Samsung is objectively better at call quality, and iPhone is objectively better at loudspeaker volume, so if these matter to you, keep them in mind.

 

EDIT: There's also the GS4 rumored to be coming in March (which means May/June in US). If that affects your thinking.


Edited by zenter, 19 February 2013 - 01:08 PM.


#6 maufman


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Posted 19 February 2013 - 01:22 PM

I'm an ex-Droid user who has been in the iOS ecosystem exclusively for a couple years now. Apple is known for its slickness and user-friendly controls, but that's overblown -- I'm not a techie, but I had no problem using my Droid. What sold me is the way Apple executes the mundane supply chain stuff. I'm sure Samsung has closed the gap, but the fact that "removable battery" appears on zenter's list as a positive for the Droid gives me pause-- sure, it's better in theory, but with the iPhone, I've never had a need to pull out the battery. 

 

I recently upgraded from the iPhone 4 to the iPhone 5, and while the upgrade wasn't mind-blowing overall, the difference in call quality is night and day. Therefore, I question whether Samsung is still "objectively better at call quality."



#7 zenter


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Posted 19 February 2013 - 01:33 PM

I'm an ex-Droid user who has been in the iOS ecosystem exclusively for a couple years now. Apple is known for its slickness and user-friendly controls, but that's overblown -- I'm not a techie, but I had no problem using my Droid. What sold me is the way Apple executes the mundane supply chain stuff. I'm sure Samsung has closed the gap, but the fact that "removable battery" appears on zenter's list as a positive for the Droid gives me pause-- sure, it's better in theory, but with the iPhone, I've never had a need to pull out the battery. 

 

I recently upgraded from the iPhone 4 to the iPhone 5, and while the upgrade wasn't mind-blowing overall, the difference in call quality is night and day. Therefore, I question whether Samsung is still "objectively better at call quality."

 

Regarding the removable battery - the need to pull the battery (to reset) is immaterial to me - I've needed to hard-reboot both phones. I like removable battery because it makes it possible to carry an extra battery, which I did for my previous phones. I now have an external Mophie battery pack, so that's sort of a moot point going forward, but it's much less slim. To me, a removable battery is a positive, but I see where one may disagree.

 

As for call quality - I forgot that the iPhone 5 graduated to the same sound-cancellation technology used in other phones for about 3 years. My bad. Now there's no difference.

 

A couple other things I forgot about...

 

Pros

 

iPhone: Camera/software is brilliant.

S3: NFC, microUSB.

 

Cons

 

iPhone: Proprietary connector.

S3: S-Voice is crap compared to Siri, but both are huge gimmicks.


Edited by zenter, 19 February 2013 - 01:34 PM.


#8 wade boggs chicken dinner


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Posted 19 February 2013 - 02:19 PM

Ok, so it's time to upgrade my phone.  I currently have a Blackberry 9800 and the contract is up.  My provider has offered me either an Iphone5 or an S3 (There are other options but those are my choices in either IOS or Android).

 

Can anyone here help me decide?  There are lots of internet pages with pros and cons but I know some of you have more hands on experience.  By the way, the S3 comes much cheaper and that's why I'm leaning towards that one.

 

Any help is appreciated, thanks.

 

Curious - did you put any thought into waiting for the new Blackberry?



#9 trekfan55


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Posted 19 February 2013 - 02:51 PM

Curious - did you put any thought into waiting for the new Blackberry?

I actually have.  But the Z10 amd the keyboard including one are not out yet in the USA so I have no idea when my provider will have it in Panama.  At this point I am thinking about having my s3/iphone with my unlimited data plan (which includes 100MB of data while roaming) and unlock my blackberry, and have it for backup with an absolutely minimum plan while I gradually "wean" off the blackberry environment.

 

It is yet to be seen how the new blackberry system works and if indeed it will save the company and the OS, which is gradually dying.

 

BTW I have not even thought about a Nokia Lumia with Windows Phone, but a friend of mine showed me the phone and it looks incredible.



#10 zenter


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Posted 19 February 2013 - 02:57 PM

BTW I have not even thought about a Nokia Lumia with Windows Phone, but a friend of mine showed me the phone and it looks incredible.

 

I'm a huge fan of Nokia's WP8 phone line and hope it gains serious traction. The interface is brilliant/simple and Nokia has always made my favorite hardware. Right now, the lack of app support is glaring - they don't even have a Pandora app, and Google hasn't rolled out any apps for it. MS's plan to integrate codebases of Win RT and WP8 is promising, but that's a "3 years from now" kind of thing. If you can live without these things, I'd add the Lumia 920 to my list if I were you.



#11 NortheasternPJ


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Posted 19 February 2013 - 02:57 PM

Regarding the removable battery - the need to pull the battery (to reset) is immaterial to me - I've needed to hard-reboot both phones. I like removable battery because it makes it possible to carry an extra battery, which I did for my previous phones. I now have an external Mophie battery pack, so that's sort of a moot point going forward, but it's much less slim. To me, a removable battery is a positive, but I see where one may disagree.

 

As for call quality - I forgot that the iPhone 5 graduated to the same sound-cancellation technology used in other phones for about 3 years. My bad. Now there's no difference.

 

A couple other things I forgot about...

 

Pros

 

iPhone: Camera/software is brilliant.

S3: NFC, microUSB.

 

Cons

 

iPhone: Proprietary connector.

S3: S-Voice is crap compared to Siri, but both are huge gimmicks.

 

What do you use NFC for? I've really seen a need for it. 



#12 zenter


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Posted 19 February 2013 - 03:05 PM

What do you use NFC for? I've really seen a need for it. 

 

If AT&T fully supported it on my phone, I'd use it to pay for stuff. I already use the Starbucks app and Square, so it's a small step to just tapping my phone.

 

I did root (to enable some basic NSF functions, but not wallet) and have ordered a couple NFC tags in the mail from Tagstand. If those work, it's a great way to set your phone up to do actions, for example, I use a bluetooth clip to listen to podcasts, and it would be nice to simply tap a tag to activate bluetooth and disable wifi as I leave the house, etc. I'll keep you all posted once the tags arrive.

 

Either way, the future of mobile payments will be via NFC, and having it future-proofs a phone more than not having it. Not a huge thing, but it's nice.


Edited by zenter, 19 February 2013 - 03:06 PM.


#13 wade boggs chicken dinner


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Posted 19 February 2013 - 10:51 PM

I'm a huge fan of Nokia's WP8 phone line and hope it gains serious traction. The interface is brilliant/simple and Nokia has always made my favorite hardware. Right now, the lack of app support is glaring - they don't even have a Pandora app, and Google hasn't rolled out any apps for it. MS's plan to integrate codebases of Win RT and WP8 is promising, but that's a "3 years from now" kind of thing. If you can live without these things, I'd add the Lumia 920 to my list if I were you.

 

Pandora app is supposed to be coming, but Nokia has its own music service.  Is there a huge difference between the two?



#14 Turrable

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Posted 20 February 2013 - 12:10 AM

I was faced with this decision a few months ago, went with the GS3 and haven't regretted it. Three big advantages I've seen so far are the screen size (iPhones look absurdly small to me now), microSD slot (got a 16 GB card on Amazon for like ten bucks and doubled the phone's memory), and Swype keyboard. Granted the iPhone keyboard might be fine when you get used to it but I've never been able to get the hang of those things.



#15 czar


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Posted 20 February 2013 - 08:34 AM

FWIW (not trying to sway anyone) but features like Swype, swipe toggles for things like Airplane mode, SMS replies, etc. are available to jailbroken iPhone users (which -- at the present -- is rather easy to do).



#16 zenter


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Posted 20 February 2013 - 12:50 PM

Pandora app is supposed to be coming, but Nokia has its own music service.  Is there a huge difference between the two?

 

I haven't used Nokia Music since it first launched, but back then it was an unlimited a la carte music consumption model (you can download whatever songs you want as long as you were a subscriber), versus learning/streaming radio stations. If it has a streaming radio feature comparable to Pandora, then you're right that Pandora is redundant... Assuming Nokia Music radio stations can be accessed off-device.



#17 Max Power


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Posted 20 February 2013 - 01:46 PM

I haven't used Nokia Music since it first launched, but back then it was an unlimited a la carte music consumption model (you can download whatever songs you want as long as you were a subscriber), versus learning/streaming radio stations. If it has a streaming radio feature comparable to Pandora, then you're right that Pandora is redundant... Assuming Nokia Music radio stations can be accessed off-device.

 

The streaming portion is exactly like Pandora.  You choose three bands and it makes a station out of it for you.  It's free and has no commercials when you're using it through a Nokia phone.  You can choose to download a stream for offline listening and refresh it periodically to get new songs added.  The $4 a month option gives you higher quality audio and some other options.



#18 trekfan55


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Posted 20 February 2013 - 02:19 PM

So it looks like I'm getting a better price from my provider and if that is the case I may opt for the iphone5 given that I am practically "inmersed" in an Apple environment.

 

Both phones have pros and cons from what I see.  And there's no real clear winner. 



#19 zenter


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Posted 20 February 2013 - 03:11 PM

So it looks like I'm getting a better price from my provider and if that is the case I may opt for the iphone5 given that I am practically "inmersed" in an Apple environment.

 

Both phones have pros and cons from what I see.  And there's no real clear winner. 

 

You will get far superior customer service via Apple, so unless you are rather compelled by Android (as I am) or some other specs of the S3 (again, as I am), then iPhone is probably a better long-term solution, given your Apple-ness. Don't neglect trying both phones extensively first, though.



#20 Nick Kaufman


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Posted 20 February 2013 - 05:47 PM

I ve used both the Iphone 4s and the S3. I like the iphone better. I think you ve got more options with the S3, but the iphone is better executed. To properly set the S3 to your liking, you will need a couple of months... and you will still be missing features. The iphone is a matter of couple of hours. Having used an iphone, I was also turned off by the size of the S3. I could not use it with one hand with the same facility I can use my iphone; it is a bit of a hassle. You also get to touch the wrong button often on the S3.

 

That's not to deny that the S3 is a very very very good phone.



#21 zenter


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Posted 20 February 2013 - 06:15 PM

To properly set the S3 to your liking, you will need a couple of months... and you will still be missing features. The iphone is a matter of couple of hours.

 

YMMV. I find the exact opposite. After two years, I'm still not able to set up my iPhone to work as I like, and setting up my Android took a week or so. This is a highly personal experience, which is why extensive time playing with devices is key. For example, my mom likes the S3 precisely because it's big (and easier-to-read and type on) and my cousin likes the iPhone because it's super straightforward and easy-to-pocket.


Edited by zenter, 20 February 2013 - 06:19 PM.


#22 Nick Kaufman


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Posted 20 February 2013 - 11:57 PM

Let me give two examples of what I mean:

 

1. Android has launchers, essentially programs for customizing the look, feel and effects of the ui. Well, it took me a few days to understand the concept+some time to understand the difference of the app drawer and the home screen. Then it took another few days to find a launcher that I like. Then I saw some extensive youtube videos about setting up your launcher like a boss. I decided it was too much hassle and I never tried. Is it necessary to learn that? No. But I still feel I am not taking advantage of the phone.


There's no customization for the Iphone, other than sorting out the apps and finding a wallpaper.

 

2. How about a music player? Iphone has just one. It works a certain way and that's it, although itunes is indeed a headache and it pisses me off there's no proper equalizer. In android, I had to download 4-5 music players and experiment with all of them until I found one to my liking. Again, that's an advantage and a disadvantage. It's an advantage because you ve got more choice, but after a point where you have to choose every single thing, it gets tiresome.



#23 Blacken


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Posted 21 February 2013 - 02:31 AM

You didn't "have" to download multiple music players (or multiple launchers) and mess with them. You chose to do so. Knocking the platform for the ability to do so is dumb. I downloaded the first one I saw on Google Play (Poweramp) and have not been compelled to look for another. I know others exist, but it has never come to mind.

 

And, no, there are definitely alternative music players for iOS. Ecoute is a well-regarded one.


Edited by Blacken, 21 February 2013 - 02:33 AM.


#24 Drocca


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Posted 21 February 2013 - 10:02 AM

I have an SGII (I think it was II, it doesn't matter) and will be upgrading soon. For me, the bloatware will move me to iphone permanently. It may not matter much to you that there are a bunch of stupid fucking apps that you cannot take off, but it matters to me. And I'm not going to root a phone or some other such silly shit, I just want it to call people, text people and look up stupid shit on the internet.



#25 FL4WL3SS


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Posted 21 February 2013 - 10:12 AM

I ve used both the Iphone 4s and the S3. I like the iphone better. I think you ve got more options with the S3, but the iphone is better executed. To properly set the S3 to your liking, you will need a couple of months... and you will still be missing features. The iphone is a matter of couple of hours. Having used an iphone, I was also turned off by the size of the S3. I could not use it with one hand with the same facility I can use my iphone; it is a bit of a hassle. You also get to touch the wrong button often on the S3.

 

That's not to deny that the S3 is a very very very good phone.

Exactly what features were missing on the S3 after a couple of months? The S3 is way more feature rich than the iPhone.



#26 zenter


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Posted 21 February 2013 - 10:43 AM

I have an SGII (I think it was II, it doesn't matter) and will be upgrading soon. For me, the bloatware will move me to iphone permanently. It may not matter much to you that there are a bunch of stupid fucking apps that you cannot take off, but it matters to me. And I'm not going to root a phone or some other such silly shit, I just want it to call people, text people and look up stupid shit on the internet.

 

While I agree with you on GS2 carrier bloatware, I consider a fair number of preinstalled (non-removable) iPhone apps as bloatware as well - "Newsstand", "Stocks", "Gamecenter", Apple's "Maps", and "Passbook", to name five.

 

 

Exactly what features were missing on the S3 after a couple of months? The S3 is way more feature rich than the iPhone.

 

I can only think of one big one - simplicity. For some, the dead-simple iOS interface is a boon, not a drawback. I find it limiting, but many do not.


Edited by zenter, 21 February 2013 - 10:44 AM.


#27 Drocca


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Posted 21 February 2013 - 10:47 AM

Zenter, excellent point about iphone's bloatware. I shouldn't insinuate that they have none. They simply have less and that's good enough for me.

 

I think of it like this; if you want to be engaged with your phone and an active user then you should use Android. If you think that last sentence sounds as terrible as I do, you should use iphone.



#28 jayhoz


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Posted 21 February 2013 - 10:49 AM

While I agree with you on GS2 carrier bloatware, I consider a fair number of preinstalled (non-removable) iPhone apps as bloatware as well - "Newsstand", "Stocks", "Gamecenter", Apple's "Maps", and "Passbook", to name five.

 

 

 

I can only think of one big one - simplicity. For some, the dead-simple iOS interface is a boon, not a drawback. I find it limiting, but many do not.

 

Agreed.  The only reasons I can see for going iPhone are

1) Investment in the Apple ecosystem

2) Aesthetics

3) App count

4) Simplicity



#29 Nick Kaufman


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Posted 21 February 2013 - 12:13 PM

You didn't "have" to download multiple music players (or multiple launchers) and mess with them. You chose to do so. Knocking the platform for the ability to do so is dumb. I downloaded the first one I saw on Google Play (Poweramp) and have not been compelled to look for another. I know others exist, but it has never come to mind.

 

And, no, there are definitely alternative music players for iOS. Ecoute is a well-regarded one.

 

The point was that Apple's default music player was good enough and I didn't feel like tinkering. To be precise, I did download a music program that had an equalizer, wasn't satisfied with it and reverted to the default music player and managed to live with it. My issue with apple is itunes on my computer which was and is a headache.

 

I didn't like Android's default music player however, so -especially since I knew that Android provided alternative options- I downloaded 3-4 music players. I did settle on Poweramp which is nice, but it has a higher learning curve than Apple's default Music Player and took me a while to figure out that I liked it more than winamp and the other popular player what's-its-name.
 

 

Exactly what features were missing on the S3 after a couple of months? The S3 is way more feature rich than the iPhone.

 

It's not so much that I am missing features. It's the knowledge that I am not using the phone to its full capacity because there are so many nifty tricks and features that you get the sense you don't know everything there is to know about the phone's OS.

 

Let me also emphasize again the issue of the phone's built. I think that the iphone feels more solid and substantial while the S3's large screen makes it a pain to handle with one hand.


But again, the S3 is a good phone, no doubt about that.


PS. Thinking about it, I would like if the iphone had an expansion memory slot and a radio tuner like the S3 does (or rather the international version that I used).



#30 BrazilianSoxFan

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Posted 21 February 2013 - 12:20 PM

If you don't like bloatware, by a Nexus. They are the "pure" android experience and, in my opinion, if you want to compare android with ios it should be nexus vs iphone.

 

I'm not saying that the S3 and the like aren't good, they are, but they are not just android.



#31 teddykgb

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Posted 21 February 2013 - 12:21 PM

Agreed.  The only reasons I can see for going iPhone are

1) Investment in the Apple ecosystem

2) Aesthetics

3) App count

4) Simplicity

 

I agree with the general consensus and generally give the advice that if you're someone who wants to customize or tinker with your phone or think you might want to, go Android.  If the idea of doing that sounds daunting or repulsive, go iPhone.  If you generally don't care, you're probably better off iPhone but then let whichever team's marketing suits your fancy decide.

 

I'd add onto your list:

5) Customer Service

6) OS Updates

7) App priority  (if you care about having the hot new App NOW, it's most likely going to be built for iOS first for at least the short term future)


Edited by teddykgb, 21 February 2013 - 12:22 PM.


#32 zenter


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Posted 21 February 2013 - 12:29 PM

If you don't like bloatware, by a Nexus. They are the "pure" android experience and, in my opinion, if you want to compare android with ios it should be nexus vs iphone.

 

I'm not saying that the S3 and the like aren't good, they are, but they are not just android.

 

The S3 and iPhone are both carrier-subsidized in the US and Canada, so the most apples-to-apples comparison here is S3 and iPhone. Keep in mind that the US carriers charge the same monthly fee regardless of whether they subsidize your phone or not, so you're worst off if you don't upgrade as soon as you possibly can in most cases. US T-Mobile is experimenting with moving to a model more consistent with the rest of the world.

 

 

 

5) Customer Service

 

If you are likely to drop your phone or expect to need some professional/reliable help when something goes awry, get an iPhone. As I said in post #5, Apple's customer service is second-to-none. Google and Samsung and everyone else are far worse.



#33 Blacken


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Posted 21 February 2013 - 12:56 PM

Keep in mind that the US carriers charge the same monthly fee regardless of whether they subsidize your phone or not

My $30/month HSPA+-friendly setup with T-Mobile asks you WAT (100 voice minutes, unlimited text/data), and AT&T has a $50/month plan that has something like 450 voice minutes with unlimited text and functionally-unlimited data.

 

Unless you're a Verizon captive, prepaid plans are going to save you a boatload of money for no additional aggravation. One year with the Nexus 4 and either of those plans and you've more than made back the subsidy price from a postpaid plan with phone. (It does mean you can't roam, but you aren't a CDMA peasant; you should be getting a pay-by-day SIM if you're in some unpatriotic un-American place regardless of your standard plan.)


Edited by Blacken, 21 February 2013 - 12:58 PM.


#34 zenter


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Posted 21 February 2013 - 01:03 PM

My $30/month HSPA+-friendly setup with T-Mobile asks you WAT (100 voice minutes, unlimited text/data), and AT&T has a $50/month plan that has something like 450 voice minutes with unlimited text and functionally-unlimited data.

 

Unless you're a Verizon captive, prepaid plans are going to save you a boatload of money for no additional aggravation. One year with the Nexus 4 and either of those plans and you've more than made back the subsidy price from a postpaid plan with phone.

 

AT&T is increasingly-restrictive on prepaid - they are detecting the smartphone you use and changing your plan for you, limiting you to 1GB @ $65/month. Any more data, and post-paid is your only option.



#35 Blacken


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Posted 21 February 2013 - 01:15 PM

Ah, so they finally fixed that? Shitty. The twelve people who use all those voice minutes to talk to each other must be so sad! :smith:

 

Straight Talk now uses T-Mobile exclusively, too. Doh.



#36 FL4WL3SS


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Posted 21 February 2013 - 01:21 PM

The point was that Apple's default music player was good enough and I didn't feel like tinkering. To be precise, I did download a music program that had an equalizer, wasn't satisfied with it and reverted to the default music player and managed to live with it. My issue with apple is itunes on my computer which was and is a headache.

 

I didn't like Android's default music player however, so -especially since I knew that Android provided alternative options- I downloaded 3-4 music players. I did settle on Poweramp which is nice, but it has a higher learning curve than Apple's default Music Player and took me a while to figure out that I liked it more than winamp and the other popular player what's-its-name.
 

 

It's not so much that I am missing features. It's the knowledge that I am not using the phone to its full capacity because there are so many nifty tricks and features that you get the sense you don't know everything there is to know about the phone's OS.

 

Let me also emphasize again the issue of the phone's built. I think that the iphone feels more solid and substantial while the S3's large screen makes it a pain to handle with one hand.


But again, the S3 is a good phone, no doubt about that.


PS. Thinking about it, I would like if the iphone had an expansion memory slot and a radio tuner like the S3 does (or rather the international version that I used).

I still don't understand what you're trying to get at - the S3 can be as complicated or simplistic as you want it to be. My phone has 2 screens currently; I haven't done anything fancy to it and it's beautifully simplistic right now. Adding widgets and changing loaders is as simple as downloading an app or selecting a widget to choose - I don't really get the consternation over it's complexity.

 

You know what was nice when I turned on my S3? Every screen that I went to for the first time gave me a tutorial on the awesome features that it came with and I could choose to see that message again the next time I went to the screen or not. There was very little learning curve with the phone and in fact, think it was easier in some regards to the iPhone. My mom got an iPhone 6 months ago and still can't figure out how to Facetime my wife and I.

 

I think the iPhone's simplicity is overblown. The simple fact that it takes multiple menu selections for tasks that it takes me to do in one or two proves that out to me. In some situations, yes it can be more simple, especially in the look and feel of the phone which hasn't changed since the first iPhone.

 

The iPhone is great and there are some great Android phones - people that complain that the S3 is more complicated probably say that because they're comfortable with their iPhone.



#37 FL4WL3SS


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Posted 21 February 2013 - 01:32 PM

Also, there's this:

 

http://www.dvice.com...iopian-kids.php

 

[What happens if you give a thousand Motorola Zoom tablet PCs
to Ethiopian kids who have never even seen a printed word? Within five
months, they'll start teaching themselves English while circumventing
the security on your OS to customize settings and activate disabled
hardware.]

 

It's obviously not complicated, it's just that people don't want to make an effort or are intimidated by the technology.



#38 teddykgb

  • 3446 posts

Posted 21 February 2013 - 02:58 PM

if you seriously think that "changing launchers" is even something that makes sense to someone who needs simplicity then I think you probably aren't understanding what he's talking about.

 

I mean, if we're going to play the overly trite "even my mom can handle ..." game, imagine handing an S3 to someone who apparently can't figure out how to facetime and asking her to change her launcher.  I think Nick Kaufman's points were pretty obvious, getting the most out of your android mostly comprises out of reading a bunch on all the apps and options that are out there and then finding the customizations and versions of those which end up feeling right to you.  You can, of course, stick to stock experiences, but if you're going to do so then you're negating the most serious benefits of the android platform.  Doesn't make it a bad choice by any stretch and I own and use both, but I think it's pretty obvious that the tinkering of Android, while not rocket science, is not exactly intuitive for the type of people who don't see their phones as devices to be tinkered with and instead just want it to make phone calls and have apps.



#39 zenter


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Posted 21 February 2013 - 03:06 PM

if you seriously think that "changing launchers" is even something that makes sense to someone who needs simplicity then I think you probably aren't understanding what he's talking about.

 

I mean, if we're going to play the overly trite "even my mom can handle ..." game, imagine handing an S3 to someone who apparently can't figure out how to facetime and asking her to change her launcher.  I think Nick Kaufman's points were pretty obvious, getting the most out of your android mostly comprises out of reading a bunch on all the apps and options that are out there and then finding the customizations and versions of those which end up feeling right to you.  You can, of course, stick to stock experiences, but if you're going to do so then you're negating the most serious benefits of the android platform.  Doesn't make it a bad choice by any stretch and I own and use both, but I think it's pretty obvious that the tinkering of Android, while not rocket science, is not exactly intuitive for the type of people who don't see their phones as devices to be tinkered with and instead just want it to make phone calls and have apps.

 

You're right, except the current generation of custom Android launchers offered by all major manufacturers is more than sufficient for most users. This critique really only makes sense pre Android 2.3.

 

Playing the "mom" game, my mom loves her iPad and loves her GS3. She's not a tinkerer and she's not app-happy either. The types of things she asks me to help her with on the GS3 are the same things she would ask me to help her with on an iPhone (e.g., adding a contact to the homescreen, etc).

 

This is to say: at this point, it all comes down to taste and playing with the devices.



#40 FL4WL3SS


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Posted 21 February 2013 - 03:10 PM

if you seriously think that "changing launchers" is even something that makes sense to someone who needs simplicity then I think you probably aren't understanding what he's talking about.

 

I mean, if we're going to play the overly trite "even my mom can handle ..." game, imagine handing an S3 to someone who apparently can't figure out how to facetime and asking her to change her launcher.  I think Nick Kaufman's points were pretty obvious, getting the most out of your android mostly comprises out of reading a bunch on all the apps and options that are out there and then finding the customizations and versions of those which end up feeling right to you.  You can, of course, stick to stock experiences, but if you're going to do so then you're negating the most serious benefits of the android platform.  Doesn't make it a bad choice by any stretch and I own and use both, but I think it's pretty obvious that the tinkering of Android, while not rocket science, is not exactly intuitive for the type of people who don't see their phones as devices to be tinkered with and instead just want it to make phone calls and have apps.

I even admitted as much to not understanding his position. Also, reread my statement - I never made a "my mom can even handle" type of statement. I called my  mom an idiot because she can't figure out Facetime. I was just pointing to the fact that not all actions on the iPhone are super obvious like everyone wants you to believe. I liked the tutorial approach of the S3 out of the box and were arguing to it's benefits.



#41 FL4WL3SS


  • Mrs. Dennis Wideman


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Posted 21 February 2013 - 03:11 PM

Jerk.



#42 teddykgb

  • 3446 posts

Posted 21 February 2013 - 03:45 PM

You're right, except the current generation of custom Android launchers offered by all major manufacturers is more than sufficient for most users. This critique really only makes sense pre Android 2.3.

 

Playing the "mom" game, my mom loves her iPad and loves her GS3. She's not a tinkerer and she's not app-happy either. The types of things she asks me to help her with on the GS3 are the same things she would ask me to help her with on an iPhone (e.g., adding a contact to the homescreen, etc).

 

This is to say: at this point, it all comes down to taste and playing with the devices.

 

I'm not critiquing.  I agree that Android as it stands is totally fine on its own at this point and is probably a matter of personal preference.  I was just snidely pointing out that "changing your launcher" is not exactly a normal activity and maybe not the best example of android's simplicity.  It even happens to be a pretty trivial thing to do, but who the hell would even think that that is a possibility?  It hurts my brain to even think about how to explain what it is and why you'd do it to someone who isn't a phone tinkerer.



#43 crow216


  • SoSH Member


  • 5611 posts

Posted 21 February 2013 - 03:50 PM

Again, I constantly see people boiling iPhone vs Android down to features and simplicity and I don't quite understand it.

 

Once you've used the phone for a week (Android or iPhone) you're pretty much done tinkering. Sure, you can root or jailbreak and take it to the next level but for purposes of this debate, that's not very relevant. For me, it comes down to apps and not just quantity but quality. iPhone not only gets most apps first, but they usually come ad-free and work correctly. Also, while Android has improved in this regard, the OS upgrade system is still fragmented as shit. You might like and rave about the new Android OS but there's a good chance your phone won't be able to use it right away. With the iPhone, you're always on the same page as Apple and the developers unless your phone's hardware is outdated.

 

My biggest beef with the iPhone that has caused me to consider switching to android is that it's stale. I'm bored with it. That's not an iOS flaw but after a couple years of iPhone use, I think most people would agree with me that they need something that both internally and externally feels new.



#44 Blacken


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Posted 21 February 2013 - 04:06 PM

You might like and rave about the new Android OS but there's a good chance your phone won't be able to use it right away.

 

There is a 0% chance that my phone won't be able to use it "right away".

 

The likelihood of getting Android updates is not probabilistic.

 

 

EDIT: For clarification: "iPhone or GS3" is the wrong framing. It's an XY problem, where X is "use Android" and Y is "buy a GS3". If you buy Android devices without the intent to root them and do not buy Nexus devices, you are fucking yourself over.


Edited by Blacken, 21 February 2013 - 04:27 PM.


#45 BrazilianSoxFan

  • 1083 posts

Posted 21 February 2013 - 08:18 PM

The S3 and iPhone are both carrier-subsidized in the US and Canada, so the most apples-to-apples comparison here is S3 and iPhone. Keep in mind that the US carriers charge the same monthly fee regardless of whether they subsidize your phone or not, so you're worst off if you don't upgrade as soon as you possibly can in most cases. US T-Mobile is experimenting with moving to a model more consistent with the rest of the world.

 

How much does the Nexus 4 costs from the Play Store without a contract? From what I know it should be 299 and 349 (8GB and 16GB respectively), but I can't access the play store from Brazil and a friend that lives in the US said that while trying to buy one of them in the store she is eventually asked if she wanna buy the phone with a contract or not and that without a contract the price rises to 599 for the 8GB one. Is this right? Not that I doubt her, but she isn't exactly computer savy...

 

I was sure she was doing something wrong till I saw this page from T-Mobile that said that the retail price was 549, but had a 300 discount if you buy with a 2 year contract. Now I have no idea what to think.



#46 Blacken


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Posted 21 February 2013 - 08:56 PM

Both are true. It's $299 on Google Play and $549 in T-Mobile stores. It's the price you pay (ha) for trusting the carrier's employees.



#47 BrazilianSoxFan

  • 1083 posts

Posted 21 February 2013 - 09:00 PM

Thanks. 






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