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Stan "The Man" Musial passes away


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#1 soxhop411


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Posted 19 January 2013 - 07:53 PM

RT @dgoold: #Cardinals great Stan "The Man" Musial died today in St. Louis at 5:45 p.m. local time. He was surrounded by family.


Sad day for baseball today.

#2 Marbleheader


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Posted 19 January 2013 - 07:55 PM

Fuck. I hate seeing these guys go.

#3 Bob Montgomery's Helmet Hat


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Posted 19 January 2013 - 07:56 PM

I've always felt that he was one of the most underrated superstars of all time.

#4 Spacemans Bong


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Posted 19 January 2013 - 08:03 PM

I had 3 posts before somebody said he was underrated.

RIP Man.

#5 Jordu

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 08:03 PM

http://cbssports.com...-dies-at-age-92

Edited by Jordu, 19 January 2013 - 08:04 PM.


#6 DannyDarwinism

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 08:04 PM

He was my father's boyhood hero and a near mythical figure for me.

#7 TheWalthamKid

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 08:04 PM

One of the last ballplayers connected to the war era. Symbolized everything that St. Louis Cardinal baseball was about, a great man and a great ballplayer.

#8 pedro1918

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 08:06 PM

My old man's favorite non-Ted Williams player of all time.

Rest in peace.

#9 fenwaypaul

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 08:06 PM

Weaver and Musial on the same day. Wonder if Willie Mays is looking over his shoulder.

#10 SumnerH


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Posted 19 January 2013 - 08:06 PM

Stan at 87 years old:


#11 bankshot1


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Posted 19 January 2013 - 08:17 PM

I feel lucky to have seen him play a few times when I was a kid..

Very sad day for baseball

#12 soxfaninyankeeland


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Posted 19 January 2013 - 08:20 PM

1815 hits at home, 1815 hits on the road. Amazing.

#13 SemperFidelisSox


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Posted 19 January 2013 - 08:36 PM

Is there a baseball serial killer on the loose?

#14 SoxFanInPdx

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 08:36 PM

Is there a baseball serial killer on the loose?


Fucking Selig!

#15 maufman


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Posted 19 January 2013 - 08:55 PM

He had a higher career BA and OBP than Wade Boggs, and also hit 475 HRs in an era when that was still a shit-ton. "The Man," for sure.

My Dad grew up outside Pittsburgh in the late 1940's and 1950's and went to maybe 25 games a year at Forbes Field. Stan Musial is the visiting player he mentions most often -- no small distinction, considering the ridiculous number of all-time greats who plied their trade in the National League in those days.

RIP.

#16 terrynever


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Posted 19 January 2013 - 08:56 PM

Musial was born 20 miles south of Pittsburgh in Donora, Pa. Population around 6,000. Also born there were Ken Griffey Sr. and Junior. Not too shabby.

According to William Nack's ESPN.com obit, Musial played with Buddy Griffey, Ken's father, and stood up for Jackie Robinson and other black baseball pioneers against some of his racist St. Louis teammates.

Edited by terrynever, 19 January 2013 - 09:38 PM.


#17 Rudy Pemberton


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Posted 19 January 2013 - 09:19 PM

331 / 417 / 559
3630
475
1599 BB / 696 K

Just look at those numbers. God damn.

#18 darnedsox

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 10:35 PM

What a drag. My neighbor 3 doors down played minor ball with the Cards and knew Enos and Stan and others of that era. He was a catcher, and from what I know, was drafted into the Army and therefore missed out on a contract. I have tried to look him up online to verify his minor league exploits-no luck. They are all gone now, and one of his daughters I am still i contact with can't help me.
Anyhow, the guy was a grumpy prick to me-didn't want my hippy ass anywhere near his girls (he'd killed me if he only knew)....(that would be three turths and no lie). Later, he'd dismiss me as not a "true" baseball lover because i was f'n DH lovin' American Leaguer. I did get to meet Stan and Enos one year when they came to his house after scouting the Cincy A ball team we had in town back in the middle sixties(Geneva NY) just a quick shake the hand and an auto that is long lost. The neighbr guy would get tickets any time he wanted in St Louie and would go twice a year. He went to all home games for the 'Series. Later, when I worked two winters in Miami beach, two hotels South of Stan & Biggies, I would go to the beach bar but missed him(Stan) a few times. He could rake. As many runs scored as batted in.

#19 Yazdog8

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 10:49 PM

One of the classiest men to ever wear a baseball uniform. And one hell of a nice guy.

Edited by Yazdog8, 19 January 2013 - 10:49 PM.


#20 Catcher Block

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 11:49 PM

I'm in my fifth year working for the Cardinals, and I've always been astounded by the stories and memories that staff members and fans have, and how everyone beamed when they got to tell the Red Sox fan about Stan Musial.

Nearly everyone in the organization has their Stan story...mine will be the reaction to his passing. During the 6-0 Blues victory over Detroit, everyone in my section got the news and immediately called someone to tell them. The older guy near me called his dad, and it was tough to watch. This was their Ted.

A sad day in St. Louis.

#21 RedOctober3829


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Posted 20 January 2013 - 12:37 AM

I'll never forget how I heard about his death. I was at the BBWAA NYC dinner tonight and the president of the Hall of Fame got up and announced that Stan had died. You could just see the reactions of people like Davey Johnson, Bud Harrellson, and Willie Mays.

#22 Savin Hillbilly


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Posted 20 January 2013 - 10:42 AM

One of my favorite Bill James lines is about Musial: “He was never colorful, never much of an interview. He makes a better statue."

#23 Bad Penny

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Posted 20 January 2013 - 11:09 AM

My first glove was a Stan Musial model that my Grandpa bought me at Montgomery Wards back in the early 70's. R.I.P.

#24 Al Zarilla


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Posted 20 January 2013 - 12:44 PM

One of my favorite Bill James lines is about Musial: “He was never colorful, never much of an interview. He makes a better statue."

There are two statues of Musial outside of Busch Stadium. I hope at least one of them captures his once and forever stance. Looking at Google images, I'm not sure. My first three baseball heroes as a kid: Ted Williams, Joe D. and Musial.

#25 jaytftwofive

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Posted 20 January 2013 - 02:10 PM

I've always felt that he was one of the most underrated superstars of all time.

My God had he played in New York he would have been ahead of Mantle and Dimagg, and right under Ruth and Gherig. Bill James ranked him as a hitter a little bit over Ted Williams also. I disagree but he had some valued points.

#26 allmanbro

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Posted 21 January 2013 - 02:19 AM

As has been mentioned, he was an underrated superstar; his career stats are eye-popping. Ted Williams is one of the best comparisons: just look at those OBPs.

More importantly, locally, the man meant everything to baseball fans here in St. Louis.

For a bit, Albert Pujols had a chance to be the new Stan the Man. But those years are over. I actually always though that the love this city showed for Stan was something that would move Albert. I, and many others, were wrong. The true greats that play of one team there entire career look to be basically extinct (Yankees and other teams with bottomless pocketbooks excepted).

Edited by allmanbro, 21 January 2013 - 02:21 AM.


#27 Savin Hillbilly


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Posted 21 January 2013 - 02:20 PM

Bill James ranked him as a hitter a little bit over Ted Williams also. I disagree but he had some valued points.


To be fair to James, he ranked Musial as the better all-around LF of the two, not as the better hitter (at least, if you're referring to his article in the Historical Abstract). The former ranking is defensible, the latter would not be.

Here's the money quote from the essay: "(I)f I had to choose between the two of them, I'd take Musial in left field, Musial on the basepaths, Musial in the clubhouse, and Williams only with the wood in his hand. And Stan Musial could hit a little, too."




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