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The New York Braves


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#1 TheYaz67

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Posted 19 October 2012 - 08:54 AM

Don't mean to "spook" Yankees fans so close to Halloween, but these numbers jumped out at me:

Atlanta Braves 1995-2005

11 postseason appearances
1 World Series Win
2 World Series Losses
3 NLCS Losses
5 NLDS Losses

NY Yankees 2001-2012 (missed postseason in 2008)

11 postseason appearances
1 World Series Win
2 World Series Losses
3 ALCS Losses
5 ALDS Losses

Postseason futility has a new home address in the Bronx. Even felt like Braves playoff games, what with all the empty seats at the Stade during ALCS games 1 and 2....

#2 Smiling Joe Hesketh


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Posted 19 October 2012 - 08:59 AM

Meh. I hate the Yankees as much as anyone but you're choosing a selective end point. Your endpoints really should be 1991 for the Braves and '95 for the Yankees. The Braves only won 1 WS despite their long dominance of their division. The Yankees have been more or less dominant since 1995, which changes your numbers by quite a bit.

#3 TheYaz67

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Posted 19 October 2012 - 09:11 AM

I think you mean starting point. Was just selecting a block of 11/12 straight years of play for each team that happened to produce these results - just kind of odd how they match up. I also chose the end point of 2005 for the Braves because of course they then proceeded to miss the postseason for the next 4 years (and one can but hope the same fate befalls the Yanks)....

#4 jon abbey


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Posted 19 October 2012 - 10:02 AM

Yeah, SJH beat me to the obvious point, since the same core won four titles in five years just before that.

So what is the historic comparison for the Red Sox of 2009-2012? :)

#5 jon abbey


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Posted 19 October 2012 - 11:02 AM

Joe Pos has a piece just up worth reading along somewhat similar lines, a different post-mortem take on this era of the Yankees.

http://www.sportsone...rticle/39913534

#6 mt8thsw9th


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Posted 19 October 2012 - 11:14 AM

So what is the historic comparison for the Red Sox of 2009-2012? :)


The 1987-1990 Yankees?

#7 jon abbey


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Posted 19 October 2012 - 11:30 AM

The 1987-1990 Yankees?


That's probably a pretty good comparison and would set you guys up for a helluva run starting in 2018.

#8 mt8thsw9th


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Posted 19 October 2012 - 11:34 AM

That's probably a pretty good comparison and would set you guys up for a helluva run starting in 2018.


I'm already psyched.

#9 Was (Not Wasdin)

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Posted 19 October 2012 - 02:48 PM

NY Yankees 2001-2012 (missed postseason in 2008)

11 postseason appearances
1 World Series Win
2 World Series Losses
3 ALCS Losses
5 ALDS Losses

Postseason futility has a new home address in the Bronx. Even felt like Braves playoff games, what with all the empty seats at the Stade during ALCS games 1 and 2....


To some extent it is cherry picking, but I think that there is a real sense that the Yankees teams from 1995-2000 were constructed much differently than the Yankees teams we saw for the rest of the 2000s. In 2000, the Yankees only had 3 of the top 10 highest salaries in the AL, and two of them were players they had developed who signed big extensions (Bernie Williams and Jeter, David Cone was the third). In 2001 they had 3/10 (swapping Clemens for Cone), and again in 2002 (swapping Mussina for Clemens). By 2004 they were up to 5/10, with Jeter being the only home grown player (A-Roid, Mussina, Kevin Brown and Gary Freakin Sheffield were the others), 6/10 in 2005, 6/10 in 2007, and 5/10 in 2010, including the top 4. The only home grown Yankee to appear in the top 10 during all of those years was Jeter, with one appearance by Mariano and one by Andy PettiTTe on his first return swing. They certainly had altered their approach to building a roster by the early 2000's (from what had been successful during the late 1990s) by giving big contracts to FAs or picking up big contracts in trades, and it doesnt seem unreasonable to judge that period differently.




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