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Bobby Orr Film Biography


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12 replies to this topic

#1 scotian1

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Posted 14 February 2012 - 11:59 AM

If you have not had a chance to watch this three-part film biography of the greatest hockey player ever, it is well worth the time.


#2 mwonow

  • 1359 posts

Posted 15 February 2012 - 09:00 PM

Thanks for this - first two segments were great. I really got a kick out of Lanny's story.

Couldn't watch the third one...

#3 LogansDad

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Posted 16 February 2012 - 05:45 AM

That was awesome. With every new video I see on Number 4, I feel like I was cursed by not being born until 1979. I never got to see him play, but videos like this make it easy to appreciate just how amazing he was, and I think it has helped me to appreciate the greats that we have seen more recently like Tom Brady... they just don't come around all that often.

Thanks for posting this.

#4 scotian1

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Posted 17 February 2012 - 01:13 PM

I still marvel that he was playing major junior as a 14 yr. old playing against guys 5 and 6 years older than him.

#5 scotian1

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Posted 17 February 2012 - 01:42 PM

If you had trouble finding the final segment to this film biography, here it is. It recounts his knee problems, his playing in the 1976 Canada Cup for Team Canada when he could barely walk yet he won the tournament's MVP award, his retirement and number retirement.



#6 mwonow

  • 1359 posts

Posted 18 February 2012 - 01:28 PM

If you had trouble finding the final segment to this film biography, here it is. It recounts his knee problems, his playing in the 1976 Canada Cup for Team Canada when he could barely walk yet he won the tournament's MVP award, his retirement and number retirement.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TMx2AgEhwwM&feature=player_embedded


Sorry - I didn't have trouble finding it, I just couldn't watch. Even this many years later, I remember the knee problems, and how hard it was to watch Bobby stop being Bobby.

#7 Dalton Jones

  • 1334 posts

Posted 22 February 2012 - 04:34 PM

I saw almost all his games on tv and a few times live at the Garden. I worshiped the ground he walked on. If I met him today I wouldn't be able to speak. He was transcendent.

#8 jaret001

  • 141 posts

Posted 23 February 2012 - 10:50 AM

I saw almost all his games on tv and a few times live at the Garden. I worshiped the ground he walked on. If I met him today I wouldn't be able to speak. He was transcendent.

I grew up watching him, Esposito and the rest as well. My Orr story: during college I had the opportunity to spend time with former Whalers VP PR Phil Langan who was helping me try to get a front office position. He took me on a tour before a game and when we got on an elevator Bobby Orr was alone inside. When he acknowledged Mr. Langan and looked at me all I could do was smile - with the wide eyes of a kid seeing his idol - yet unable to say anything. Later on I was able to watch the game from the press box...and none other than Gordy Howe came through. Managed to say hello and shake his hand.

Quite a night.

#9 fenwaypaul

  • 2921 posts

Posted 23 February 2012 - 01:35 PM

I grew up watching him, Esposito and the rest as well. My Orr story: during college I had the opportunity to spend time with former Whalers VP PR Phil Langan who was helping me try to get a front office position. He took me on a tour before a game and when we got on an elevator Bobby Orr was alone inside. When he acknowledged Mr. Langan and looked at me all I could do was smile - with the wide eyes of a kid seeing his idol - yet unable to say anything. Later on I was able to watch the game from the press box...and none other than Gordy Howe came through. Managed to say hello and shake his hand.

Quite a night.


This trumps most of the stories in the P&G "encounters with the famous" thread.

#10 LoweTek

  • 727 posts

Posted 23 February 2012 - 02:06 PM

I saw almost all his games on tv and a few times live at the Garden. I worshiped the ground he walked on. If I met him today I wouldn't be able to speak. He was transcendent.


I did the same thing. TV38 was must see TV for a long time. Bobby is the one athlete I have always wanted to meet. Those I know who have met him indicate he is thoroughly gracious and approachable. He remains especially interested in kids and hockey and the growth of the game. He always was. As late as the mid 70's he was still sponsoring an annual summer tournament at Skate 3 in Tyngsboro which he would always attend. No program, no autograph tickets, no fanfare. He'd just stand next to the glass like anyone else and watch the games. He always personally gave the awards as well.

This will sound incredible to many of the present day hockey people around here but very early in his career he used to do a road show at small rinks all around New England. I think it was called the Bobby Orr Hockey Show, in fact. I was a little kid, gradeschool. He came to what used to be known as the Billerica Forum, later Joe Tully Forum (UML used to play there prior to Tsongas). He would bring along 4-5 Bruins teammates and conduct a sort of clinic on the ice. Kids would write questions on pieces of paper and he would randomly answer them sometimes accompanied by a subsequent demonstration. I can't remember too much about it but I do remember the tiny Forum was packed wall to wall and I had never seen it anywhere near capacity. You could hardly hear what he was saying the buzz was so loud not to mention the crappy sound system.

At the end when they left the rink to go to the dressing rooms under the stands, I tried get in a position in the runway to say hello or something but I was overwhelmed by the crush of people trying to do the same thing. I played hockey religiously for the next 15 years and rarely missed a game on TV. Orr was personally responsible for what would become a huge hockey boom not only in New England but all over the country.

Due to the Eagleson scandal, when he left the game he was near broke and had to get a job. He worked at Nabisco, Pandick Press and an early software company called Culinet which was later acquired by CA. All are interesting stories in themselves if you ever get a chance to look them up.

#11 scotian1

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Posted 04 March 2012 - 06:24 AM

Orr doesn't mind poking a little fun at himself either as this promo ad for Chevrolet and TSN shows.


Edited by scotian1, 04 March 2012 - 06:26 AM.


#12 mwonow

  • 1359 posts

Posted 04 March 2012 - 10:27 AM

Orr doesn't mind poking a little fun at himself either as this promo ad for Chevrolet and TSN shows.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fEvM-BpZdTg


Thanks, that was fun. There's a lot to like about Parry Sound, and the Bobby Orr references count for many of them! FWIW view from behind the Bobby Orr Hall of Fame (I thought it was called "Museum," but whatever) is great - it's on a narrow point, with big water on both sides...

#13 scotian1

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Posted 04 March 2012 - 12:33 PM

If you want to check out the Orr Hall of Fame, here is a link to its website:
http://www.bobbyorrh...om/information/

You should also check out the Hall's facebbok pare as there are some great photos.

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Bobby-Orr-Hall-of-Fame/186789610140?sk=wall#!/pages/Bobby-Orr-Hall-of-Fame/186789610140?sk=wall

Edited by scotian1, 04 March 2012 - 12:39 PM.





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