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The Feds Investigating the Marlins Stadium Deal


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#1 absintheofmalaise


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Posted 03 December 2011 - 12:15 AM

It looks like the SEC is a bit curious about how Loria convinced the local government to build him the new stadium.

The subpoenas focus heavily on the Marlins, requesting communications to and from team executives, documentation that might show the team’s ability to pay for or contribute to the financing of the stadium, and information on any meetings involving not only Loria and Selig, but also team President David Samson and former Major League Baseball president and chief operating officer Robert DuPuy. DuPuy was instrumental at the latter end of the hard-fought deal.



#2 ThePrideofShiner

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Posted 03 December 2011 - 02:52 AM

Yahoo!'s Passan has a column up about it:

http://sports.yahoo....feasance_120211

Here is the Miami Herald's story:

http://www.miamihera...into-miami.html

#3 GBrushTWood

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Posted 03 December 2011 - 11:01 AM

This is very indirectly related, but it's a brilliant piece by Matt Taibbi regarding the shady practices going on at the SEC when they investigate this type of corruption. Truly a chilling read.

A Matter Under Inquiry is just a preliminary sort of look-see – a way for the SEC to check out the multitude of tips it gets about suspicious trades, shady stock scams and false disclosures, and to determine which of the accusations merit a formal investigation. At the MUI stage, an SEC investigator can conduct interviews or ask a bank to send in information voluntarily. Bumping a MUI up to a formal investigation is critical, because it enables investigators to pull out the full law-enforcement ass-kicking measures – subpoenas, depositions, everything short of hot pokers and waterboarding. In the Deutsche case, Flynn and other SEC investigators got past the MUI stage and used their powers to collect sworn testimony and documents indicating that plenty of übernahmegespräche indeed had been going on when Breuer spoke to Der Spiegel. Based on the evidence, they sent an "Action Memorandum" to senior SEC staff, formally recommending that the agency press forward and file suit against Deutsche.

Read more: http://www.rollingst...7#ixzz1fUIHx1wP


Hopefully the SEC really goes after Loria, Samson, and the rest of the Marlin criminals. After all, they don't belong to Wall Street, right?

#4 Muddy Chicken

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Posted 04 December 2011 - 04:01 AM

1322928076[/url]' post='3875782']
This is very indirectly related, but it's a brilliant piece by Matt Taibbi regarding the shady practices going on at the SEC when they investigate this type of corruption. Truly a chilling read.



Hopefully the SEC really goes after Loria, Samson, and the rest of the Marlin criminals. After all, they don't belong to Wall Street, right?


Here's the NY Times's story:
http://bats.blogs.ny...5/?ref=baseball

#5 Rough Carrigan


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Posted 04 December 2011 - 05:04 PM

It looks like the SEC is a bit curious about how Loria convinced the local government to build him the new stadium.

What, he can't bribe City Councillors like Lucchino did in San Diego? What's this world coming to?!