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Recomendation: iPhone vs. Android


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#1 OCD SS


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Posted 28 August 2011 - 12:10 PM

I've been talking to the tech officer where I work about getting rid of our BlackBerry Storm2s when our corporate plan is up and we're looking at getting away from BlackBerry altogether. Aside from the regular gripes, if I never get another "message truncated due to size" alert from my phone which is supposed to specialize in getting me my email above everything else, it will be too soon. So the replacements will likely come down to either the iPhone5 or an Android running on Verizon (which is what we've always used). They will also probably insist on getting world phones, although that may be less of a priority given that I don't think that feature gets used all that much.

While most of the people who are issued the phones will use it as their only phone, the key will be its buisness applications, which is primarily communication (email, texts), but also to replace other devices (digital cameras, GPS and/ or navigation) and we're looking at also how we may be able to get it to interface with other buisness systems such as our Filemaker system (which can be pretty slow and clunky from my desktop)as well as possibly other administrative features. Battery life is a key point, obviously.

I'm looking for comparisons or recommendations between the two platforms that I can sell to the tech VP. I prefer a touchscreen with a larger screen, and I have a pretty strong prejudice against Motorola products. But we probably won't have the luxury of choosing between a bunch of different phones, or waiting for something fancier to come out (when we're ready to make the move, which may be in a bit).

One thing to consider is that we will have these phones for the full duration of the contract, so I'd like to have something that will age well (hardware and software). Another thing is that I represent the high end of the "tech geek" spectrum where I work, and do spend some time helping my co-workers figure out how their phones work and what they need to add to get the most out of them, so something that is easier to use is probably a plus, but they were mostly happy with their Storm2s for awhile...

I figure (or hope) it will come down to either iPhone 5s, Google Nexus Primes, or maybe the upcoming HTC offering. I'd really like to avoid anything from Motorola, but could be talked out of this prejudice.

Any help or comments are greatly appreciated.

#2 mt8thsw9th


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Posted 28 August 2011 - 12:25 PM

One thing to consider is that we will have these phones for the full duration of the contract, so I'd like to have something that will age well (hardware and software).


Considering the iPhone 3GS (which was released in June 2009) is being supported by the latest iOS build to be released this Fall, while Motorola's first "iPhone killer" (released October 2009) stopped getting OS updates this past March, that's pretty much all you need to know about "aging well" in terms of software.

The iPhone 3G received OS updates for 2 years and 4 months.
The original iPhone received OS updates for 2 years and 7 months.

You'd be hard-pressed to find an Android phone that has received updates for the length of a contract.

#3 donutogre

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Posted 28 August 2011 - 12:29 PM

Unfortunately, Verizon seems completely uninterested in offering Google/Nexus devices, which is a real shame because that's about the only way I'd go Android. One of the best things about the iPhone is the utter lack of carrier influenced crap that ends up on so many devices.

Honestly, its a pretty close race between the two platforms at this point so it will probably come down to whatever device has the hardware that you want. For large screens, I predict Android will win out.

As for battery, my guess is that the iPhone will win that one. I have yet to hear about an Android device that has battery life that is comparable with the iPhone, but on the other hand most Android devices have replaceable batteries, so you can just carry a few if necessary.

As for lasting the duration of the contract, I'd again go with iPhone...unless you get a nice Google-built device like the Nexus series, when or if you'll get software updates is a bit of a crapshoot. I would expect an iPhone 5 to receive software updates throughout the duration of its contract without worry.

That's my rambling 2 cents...not very helpful, but I think you just need to wait and see what the new iPhone is like and compare that with the best available Android options at the time. Good luck!

#4 OCD SS


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Posted 28 August 2011 - 12:54 PM

While I pay attention to software updates and OS builds on my BB, unless the phones were to stop functioning I expect that most everyone else is not interested in being on the cutting edge. There's also the issue of how the updates are installed (I may wind up walking people through that), but suspect that that is another point in the iPhone's favor as it would just come over iTunes.

So here's a follow up: our work computers are PCs, and my home computer is a mac; does that preclude me from syncing between the 2 machines? I assume I could do that with Android if I had the appropriate software/ hardware (and it's something I never really got around to doing on my BB anyway).

#5 Trautwein's Degree


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Posted 28 August 2011 - 12:55 PM

Unfortunately, Verizon seems completely uninterested in offering Google/Nexus devices, which is a real shame because that's about the only way I'd go Android. One of the best things about the iPhone is the utter lack of carrier influenced crap that ends up on so many devices.

Honestly, its a pretty close race between the two platforms at this point so it will probably come down to whatever device has the hardware that you want. For large screens, I predict Android will win out.

As for battery, my guess is that the iPhone will win that one. I have yet to hear about an Android device that has battery life that is comparable with the iPhone, but on the other hand most Android devices have replaceable batteries, so you can just carry a few if necessary.

Verizon rumored to be getting the Nexus Prime this fall. I wouldn't buy any phone right now until I see what the iPhone 5 brings. That announcement should be weeks away. In all likelyhood, I'll be switching to the next iPhone regardless of the hardware specs. iOS5 looks awesome. The next iPhone is almost certainly a world phone.

#6 mt8thsw9th


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Posted 28 August 2011 - 01:07 PM

While I pay attention to software updates and OS builds on my BB, unless the phones were to stop functioning I expect that most everyone else is not interested in being on the cutting edge. There's also the issue of how the updates are installed (I may wind up walking people through that), but suspect that that is another point in the iPhone's favor as it would just come over iTunes.

So here's a follow up: our work computers are PCs, and my home computer is a mac; does that preclude me from syncing between the 2 machines? I assume I could do that with Android if I had the appropriate software/ hardware (and it's something I never really got around to doing on my BB anyway).


With iOS you don't really even need to sync to your computer with the release of iCloud. You can have up to 5 computers associated with an iTunes account, so I presume the answer is "yes". Syncing also now takes place over wifi whenever you plug your phone into a power source.

Re: the updates, they're now OTA or via iTunes; you have a choice how to install. Regarding BB and Android updates, it's really at the whim of the carrier when they decide to release the update. I waited 6 months for Verizon to release OS 5 for BB, and just gave up and grabbed a Droid (which also had occasional waits for software releases).

If you want something that has the chance of stopping functioning, I'd recommend Android. If you want something stable and unfragmented - go iPhone.

#7 EddieYost


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Posted 28 August 2011 - 01:13 PM

So wait....mt8thsw9th....are you in favor of the iPhone? Get off the fence and tell us how you feel. :c070:

#8 czar


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Posted 28 August 2011 - 01:30 PM

So wait....mt8thsw9th....are you in favor of the iPhone? Get off the fence and tell us how you feel. :c070:


Who doesn't pine for the days when all he wanted was a sweet battery?

#9 mt8thsw9th


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Posted 28 August 2011 - 01:41 PM

Let's go further off topic, shall we?

#10 EddieYost


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Posted 28 August 2011 - 02:52 PM

Honestly...iPhones are really nice. If I could use one on my provider, and get one at a decent price, I probably would. If my company was going to pay for one for me, I would take it. I like Android better for me because it offers a lot, I can get Droids for cheap on craigslist, and my carrier allows them (they dont allow iPhones). I think in a corporate deployment iPhones probably make more sense as they are going to require less tweaking.

#11 OCD SS


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Posted 28 August 2011 - 03:57 PM

With iOS you don't really even need to sync to your computer with the release of iCloud. You can have up to 5 computers associated with an iTunes account, so I presume the answer is "yes". Syncing also now takes place over wifi whenever you plug your phone into a power source.


This is a big help, since I tend to ignore services like this.

If you want something that has the chance of stopping functioning, I'd recommend Android. If you want something stable and unfragmented - go iPhone.


To be honest, the biggest argument in favor of the iPhone is just how easy it is use; most of my coworkers are tech illiterate (and it's worse in other offices) so something that you can hand them that all works the same way and is intuitive is a huge selling point.

Honestly...iPhones are really nice. If I could use one on my provider, and get one at a decent price, I probably would. If my company was going to pay for one for me, I would take it. I like Android better for me because it offers a lot, I can get Droids for cheap on craigslist, and my carrier allows them (they dont allow iPhones). I think in a corporate deployment iPhones probably make more sense as they are going to require less tweaking.


My general inclination is to IOS5, but the trick is that I don't get to choose; I'm really just trying to lay out a list of reasons that support one platform or the other.

Things like less bloatware, or things that would reduce the buisness efficacy (even if it meant integrating non-buisness apps like facebook, say through something like motoblur) are things to consider. I remember Nip saying that the biggest issue with smartphones was that their batteries go out, and that makes a phone with a removable battery something to consider since the fix was just a matter of replacing said battery. Other things I'm considering are things like Motorola going to proprietary charging cables (while this is also an issue with apple, there's a good chance that everyone has docks or cables for their iPods).

#12 Jnai


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Posted 28 August 2011 - 04:54 PM

Battery life aside, I love my Droid Incredible. The Navigation is a killer app. Gmail integration is sweet.

And, strangely, I find the phone part of the phone to be much easier to use than my wife's iPhone. But that's probably just experience using the device.

#13 derekson

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Posted 28 August 2011 - 05:18 PM

This is a big help, since I tend to ignore services like this.



To be honest, the biggest argument in favor of the iPhone is just how easy it is use; most of my coworkers are tech illiterate (and it's worse in other offices) so something that you can hand them that all works the same way and is intuitive is a huge selling point.



My general inclination is to IOS5, but the trick is that I don't get to choose; I'm really just trying to lay out a list of reasons that support one platform or the other.

Things like less bloatware, or things that would reduce the buisness efficacy (even if it meant integrating non-buisness apps like facebook, say through something like motoblur) are things to consider. I remember Nip saying that the biggest issue with smartphones was that their batteries go out, and that makes a phone with a removable battery something to consider since the fix was just a matter of replacing said battery. Other things I'm considering are things like Motorola going to proprietary charging cables (while this is also an issue with apple, there's a good chance that everyone has docks or cables for their iPods).


If I were looking to deploy phones for my company, this would be pretty important to me: Android malware up 76 percent, nonexistent on iOS

Especially with a lot of the user base apparently not being very tech savvy, and thus likely to not vet apps they might run across.

Edited by derekson, 28 August 2011 - 05:20 PM.


#14 amlothi

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Posted 28 August 2011 - 05:36 PM

Android user here. Love it. Wouldn't recommend it for massive deployment in business yet. Why? To me, the big advantage of Android is openness and customization. These are things that can be difficult in a corporate situation if your users are changing things on their phones. It can be a nightmare for tech support.


Are you in need of encryption on your phones at all? That might be an easy way to make a decision, if that's something important to you.

#15 Gorton Fisherman

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Posted 28 August 2011 - 06:59 PM

Things like less bloatware


Point: iPhone. iPhone = zero bloatware.

I remember Nip saying that the biggest issue with smartphones was that their batteries go out.


Point: iPhone. Battery life is a strong suit of iOS devices, especially in comparison to the majority of Android devices.

Other things I'm considering are things like Motorola going to proprietary charging cables (while this is also an issue with apple, there's a good chance that everyone has docks or cables for their iPods).


Point: iPhone. While iOS compatible charging cables/docks/etc. are indeed "proprietary" to Apple (i.e. they all use Apple's "dock connector"), the fact is, the hardware ecosystem for iOS devices is a huge and often understated advantage of iOS devices. The vast majority of hardware accessories designed for iOS devices (including charging cables, docks, A/V cables, etc.) can be used across the entire Apple family of iPods, iPads, and all models of iPhone going back to 2007. A similar advantage applies to cases and whatnot: there is a huge variety of cases/screen protectors/etc. available for any given iPhone model, while the same typically cannot be said of the Samsung Menstruate or Droid Psychotic or whatever the temporarily popular Android device of the week happens to be.

#16 Kevin Jewkilis

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Posted 28 August 2011 - 07:09 PM

Point: iPhone. While iOS compatible charging cables/docks/etc. are indeed "proprietary" to Apple (i.e. they all use Apple's "dock connector"), the fact is, the hardware ecosystem for iOS devices is a huge and often understated advantage of iOS devices. The vast majority of hardware accessories designed for iOS devices (including charging cables, docks, A/V cables, etc.) can be used across the entire Apple family of iPods, iPads, and all models of iPhone going back to 2007. A similar advantage applies to cases and whatnot: there is a huge variety of cases/screen protectors/etc. available for any given iPhone model, while the same typically cannot be said of the Samsung Menstruate or Droid Psychotic or whatever the temporarily popular Android device of the week happens to be.


You're so right. I can never find micro-USB cables. Damn Motorola for using an industry-standard! Damn them to hell!

#17 Caspir

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Posted 28 August 2011 - 07:26 PM

I will say that Google Navigation is free, and far superior to the iPhone alternatives.I'm not a huge iPhone fan, and I love my Incredible. The Nexus Prime going to be a hell of a device, and since you said you're an HTC fan, they're launching some great phones this Fall. I'd wait and see what the dual core offerings are before making a decision.

#18 mt8thsw9th


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Posted 28 August 2011 - 07:28 PM

The Google Nav is a huge plus if you're managing a fleet of cab drivers.

#19 Gorton Fisherman

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Posted 28 August 2011 - 07:43 PM

You're so right. I can never find micro-USB cables. Damn Motorola for using an industry-standard! Damn them to hell!


Yeah, you're right, that's a really a huge advantage! Except for that whole 'reality' thing, which is: you're *much* more likely to find an Apple-dock compatible charging cable than a micro-USB charging cable in any given office, school, or retail establishment that exists in the United States, or probably elsewhere for that matter. Again, point: iPhone.

#20 lanstein

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Posted 28 August 2011 - 07:44 PM

iPhone. I've had two Android phones and an Android tablet. I'm over it. The user experience is not nearly as good.

#21 OCD SS


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Posted 28 August 2011 - 07:45 PM

You're so right. I can never find micro-USB cables. Damn Motorola for using an industry-standard! Damn them to hell!


I happened to read a review of the Android phone my dad switched to, the AT&T Atrix, that said that Motorola had switched to a branded micro USB, and that the phone wouldn't charge on a standard micro-USB. I assume that this will be standard on their upcoming phones (for something like the Bionic).

The Google Nav is a huge plus if you're managing a fleet of cab drivers.


Actually, I often have to do site visits to areas all around the tri-state area that involve tacking on a GPS-nav system to my rental car charges. The systems Avis or whoever give out are not particularly good, and I've often wound up relying on someone sitting next to me with an iPhone, although the google maps software on it hasn't always been great. I don't think there are plans to hand these phones out to our trucking division (probably just based on the cost vs how rough our drivers can sometimes be with phones), but since I've never owned a car in NYC I've never really gotten the "muscle memory" of all the different roads, exits, and ways around. A good nav app is a huge plus.

#22 mt8thsw9th


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Posted 28 August 2011 - 07:54 PM

Google Nav is pretty great, but the iPhone Mapquest nav app passed the "driving in LA" test when I was there in March.

#23 dcdrew10

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Posted 29 August 2011 - 08:45 AM

I have an Andriod, the HTC Glacier (US name T-mo mytouch4g, but that sounds like a sex club and I tend not to use it) and I think it is a mixed bag. I have to restart my phone at least once a day because it freezes or gets so slow it's unusable or the HTC Sense skin crashes. The battery is horrendous, I have to keep wi-fi and Bluetooth off unless I am near a power source. Getting apps off the phone are a complete pain in the neck and I have not found a free media player (obviously not a priority for a business solution, but still noteworthy) that comes even close to the iOS offerings. They released the OS update for my phone 3 months ago and I have yet to get it, which is totally carrier dependent. Wireless syncing on Android is fine, but if I want to connect my phone to the computer to sync files it's more complicated.

I like the maps and Google integration, but the Google integration isn't that far behind on iOS. The main thing I like about Android over iOS is Swype and voice commands. Entering text for emails or SMS is amazing on Swype, it's very quick and relatively painless compared to typing in iOS.

I have a first generation iPod Touch and an iPad, neither of which have ever given me any problems. The OS never needs to be restarted, the batteries last a long time, and there are no problems with syncing or updating the OS. If/when my carrier gets the iPhone I will gladly drop my Android for the Apple. The openness idea of Android is cool, but I have neither the time, nor the interest in customization and I feel that if I shell out several hundred dollars for a device, I should not have to change the operating system to get it to work the way I want it, it should just work. Another advantage is the components for iPhones are specifically matched for the iOS and integration. You don't have a situation where a carrier throws Gingerbread on a single core processor, low RAM phone and calls it entry level, but still charges $150-200 for it.

Android is not bad by any stretch, but I find iOS better in almost every way.

#24 ShaneTrot

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Posted 29 August 2011 - 09:04 AM

I have no experience with Android. I am sure it is excellent but there are four things I love about iOS. 1. Every update is easy and better than the last. 2. iTunes integration makes handling media very easy. 3. All the apps (except iPad only) work on my iPad, my daughter's iPod Touch and my iPhone. I bought Plants vs Zombies once and it plays great on all three. 4. I am paranoid about losing data and I like the synching with my Mac.

#25 Kevin Jewkilis

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Posted 29 August 2011 - 09:44 AM

Yeah, you're right, that's a really a huge advantage! Except for that whole 'reality' thing, which is: you're *much* more likely to find an Apple-dock compatible charging cable than a micro-USB charging cable in any given office, school, or retail establishment that exists in the United States, or probably elsewhere for that matter. Again, point: iPhone.


Ok, I'll concede the point. At any given school, office, or retail establishment, you're unlikely to find a cable to charge any HTC, Motorola, Nokia, LG, Hewlett-Packard, Samsung, Sony Ericsson phones and tablets, blackberries and most PDA's, a variety of mp3 players, and the two bestselling ereaders, among other devices. It's like looking for water in the middle of the Sahara. So what, that's like 3 points for iphone?

Motorola switching to a proprietary cable would be really stupid for them and contrary to the Android idea of avoiding proprietary bullshit.

#26 Foulkey Reese


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Posted 29 August 2011 - 09:53 AM

iTunes integration makes handling media very easy.


Wow.

To me, that is without a doubt the absolute worst aspect of owning an iPhone or iPad. iTunes is just beyond awful.

I personally prefer Android for multiple reasons, but I do think it would be easier to go iPhone if you're giving out the phones to multiple people. When optimized I think Android is superior to IOS, but it does take a bit of tweaking to get there and that's probably not something that's going to work in your situation.

As far as the GPS I think the free Google Maps program that comes with the Droid phones is night and day better than iPhone Mapquest. My wife has it and it's wrong constantly even in "easy" places.

But at the end of the day a good Droid and an iPhone are both awesome phones. You can't really lose going with either imo.

Point: iPhone. iPhone = zero bloatware.


To me, any program that you can't remove is bloatware, so apps like the stock checker or note pad that you can't even hide on the home screen (as far as I know anyway) are just as bad as Verizon including a Blockbuster app.

Batterywise my Droid X on Gingerbread gets almost the exact same battery life as my wife's iPhone 4 and I know that I use my phone to do more.

Edited by Foulkey Reese, 29 August 2011 - 09:56 AM.


#27 donutogre

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Posted 29 August 2011 - 09:56 AM

Here's the Android phone that will likely be the one that you stack up against the iPhone 5:
http://www.bgr.com/2...ime-in-october/

#28 Foulkey Reese


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Posted 29 August 2011 - 09:57 AM

Here's the Android phone that will likely be the one that you stack up against the iPhone 5:
http://www.bgr.com/2...ime-in-october/

Welp, so much for be getting the Bionic in a few weeks.

#29 sibpin

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Posted 29 August 2011 - 01:35 PM

the key will be its buisness applications, which is primarily communication (email, texts)


This is something that I think has been overlooked in this thread so far - I am an Android user solely because of the availability of physical keyboards. I just cannot write a good email on a phone touch screen, regardless of the various tricks people have come up with - Swype, autocomplete, voice-to-text, etc.

I agree that iOS is easier, better, all of that - I own an iPad, since typing is easier on tablets because of size and typical use environment - but if you've got fairly heavy writing needs on the phone, there is a large selection of Android phones with keyboards and no iOS solution that comes anywhere close.

#30 FL4WL3SS


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Posted 29 August 2011 - 01:42 PM

Posted Image

#31 EddieYost


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Posted 29 August 2011 - 01:53 PM

Posted Image

awesome
:rolling:

Edited by EddieYost, 29 August 2011 - 02:01 PM.


#32 zenter


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Posted 29 August 2011 - 02:22 PM

I use both every day - work-issued iPhone 4 and personal Android (Samsung Captivate). Personally, I find the Android interface to be much more pleasing. The key factor is that the benefit of Android is also its curse for wider deployments - customizability. Any phone deployed by IT would need to be customized somewhat. Android simply has more options, which is frustrating for some and a boon for others.

iPhone has the benefit of uniformity, but the drawbacks (to me) outweigh the benefits. The interface is singular and the email application is quite limited. I don't appreciate these facts, nor do I care for the iOS keyboard. iTunes is terrible for managing the device - I consistently lose apps and media content whenever I plug my iPhone in to an authorized computer. The solution to virtually any stability problem with iOS devices is either wipe or replace. Not exactly the kind of rock-solid stability mt8thsw9th discusses. iCloud's ability to resolve these issues is as yet unknown, but it may erase them. We shall see.

In terms of updates and support, something else mt8thsw9th refers to, while the OG iPhone and iPhone 3G were technically supported by the iOS released more than 2 years later, the new OS's made the devices virtually unusable. People on iPhone 3G are recommended by many tech people NOT to update to iOS 4, and I expect the same to be true for 3GS and iOS 5. It is disingenuous of Apple to treat them as supported when the new OS really does depend on the better hardware, but Apple's insistence on "simplicity" means a bad experience for anyone with an older phone.

Android also suffers from YMMV, but for the opposite reasons and with opposite effects. Each manufacturer wants its own brand all over the individual phone experience. As such, updates (while over-the-air) are not universal nor consistent. The upside is you are rarely saddled with an OS the phone's hardware cannot handle, but the downside is you may never have access to certain features. For example, Samsung is notorious for abandoning their already-released devices, Motorola and HTC less so. In this respect, HTC is second only to a Google Nexus phone.

If any phone is deployed, make sure that it is limited to one or two models, so software updating, etc., can be handled better. My first recommendation is a Google-branded Android phone which gets certain specific software packages (e.g., swype) installed prior to deployment. I'd say a close second is the iPhone, if only because other flavors of Android are harmed by manufacturer and carrier customizations.

#33 mt8thsw9th


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Posted 29 August 2011 - 02:30 PM

In terms of updates and support, something else mt8thsw9th refers to, while the OG iPhone and iPhone 3G were technically supported by the iOS released more than 2 years later, the new OS's made the devices virtually unusable. People on iPhone 3G are recommended by many tech people NOT to update to iOS 4, and I expect the same to be true for 3GS and iOS 5.


You can ask the three SoSHers that are running the iOS 5 beta on 3GS if that is the case:

http://sonsofsamhorn...ost__p__3680474

http://sonsofsamhorn...ost__p__3695607

Early returns are positive.

Edited by mt8thsw9th, 29 August 2011 - 02:35 PM.


#34 derekson

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Posted 29 August 2011 - 02:53 PM

The iOS 5 beta runs fantastically on the iPhone 3GS. iOS 4 ran poorly on the iPhone 3g, but that is no reason to assume anything about iOS5 and the 3GS. The 3GS is not terribly behind the iPhone 4 in terms of CPU and GPU compared to the huge gulf between the 3G and 3GS. If anything iOS 5 runs faster and smoother than 4 did on my 3GS.

#35 Monbo Jumbo


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Posted 29 August 2011 - 04:03 PM

Swype - point(s) Android.

#36 Foulkey Reese


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Posted 29 August 2011 - 04:09 PM

Swype - point(s) Android.

Being able to customize the keyboard and other tools might be my overall favorite aspect of Android. The thumb keyboard I have on my Asus Android tablet runs circles around the stock Android and Apple keyboard. There are just so many things about the iPhone that you're locked into and have no way of changing.

Of course if you're looking to have one phone for an entire company or department, the uniformity is probably something that you want.

#37 mt8thsw9th


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Posted 29 August 2011 - 04:15 PM

There are just so many things about the iPhone that you're locked into and have no way of changing.


Granted you're probably not going to want a corporate phone to be jailbroken, but you can get Swype via Cydia if you're so inclined.

#38 czar


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Posted 29 August 2011 - 06:12 PM

There are just so many things about the iPhone that you're locked into and have no way of changing.


Pssssshaw. I have everything your damn Android has and then some.

Thanks, Cydia!

* Yes, I acknowledge you won't want to jailbreak company phones en masse, but unless you are totally technologically illiterate (admittedly like half of iPhone users, but sorostitutes aren't involved in this discussion) the "iPhone can't do so much stuff!" meme is played out.

** So with that said, back to your "corporate phone" programming-- I also vote stock iPhone. Most reasons have been covered-- my biggest gripes would be e-mail/keyboard exp. with OOTB iOS, but depending on the employees of interest, this is probably not a dealbreaker.

Edited by czar, 29 August 2011 - 06:14 PM.


#39 Fratboy


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Posted 29 August 2011 - 06:23 PM

OCD SS, I'll echo what Foulkey's saying. They'll take my Droid X (and Nexus Prime in a few months) from my cold, dead hands before I traded it in for an iPhone. But were I to be issued a corporate phone, I'd want an iPhone. We have Blackberrys deployed here by corporate, and frankly, I'm not impressed. Granted, they get good battery life. That's about all I can really say about BB that's good. But for a simple, intuitive interface that just DOES, you can't go wrong with iPhone.

#40 CoRP

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Posted 29 August 2011 - 07:03 PM

Make them get you a Bold 9900. You'll change your mind about the Blackberry.

#41 OCD SS


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Posted 29 August 2011 - 07:59 PM

... iTunes integration makes handling media very easy.


This is actually pretty important since I often need to move pictures around from my phone to other people via email or onto the server. This is a really frustrating part of using a BB (especially with the way they stripped functionality out of the DM software).

This is something that I think has been overlooked in this thread so far - I am an Android user solely because of the availability of physical keyboards. I just cannot write a good email on a phone touch screen, regardless of the various tricks people have come up with - Swype, autocomplete, voice-to-text, etc.

I agree that iOS is easier, better, all of that - I own an iPad, since typing is easier on tablets because of size and typical use environment - but if you've got fairly heavy writing needs on the phone, there is a large selection of Android phones with keyboards and no iOS solution that comes anywhere close.


My first phone was a BB 8830, and while I can still see the point of a physical keyboard, I'm not sure anything on Android would compare to a BB keyboard (and I don't like the landscape keyboards, they're too big). After using a Storm2 (and comparing it to a straight touchscreen via using Opera Mini as a browser), I prefer having a large screen with which to see and read my email and figure I'll get used to a touchscreen.

Make them get you a Bold 9900. You'll change your mind about the Blackberry.


It's not coming with QNX is it? And the hardware and software will still be behind what's available for Android/ IOS the day it's released. Part of it is the form factor; I want a big screen (note: could just be a "full" screen, not necessarily one of the new "oversized" screens) with which to read the email since I can always pound out my super verbose emails on a desktop. If BB ever had its act together my favorite form factor is something like the Torch or Pre, but I want to steer away from what looks like a dying platform that has really annoyed me at every turn. After having to watch RIM half-ass pretty much everything at every turn for the last two years I'm done (well, if it were actually up to me).

#42 Gorton Fisherman

  • 913 posts

Posted 30 August 2011 - 06:39 AM

To me, that is without a doubt the absolute worst aspect of owning an iPhone or iPad. iTunes is just beyond awful.


You know, I hear this sort of thing a lot, and I'm curious: just what is it about iTunes that you find to be "beyond awful", exactly? I mean, I'm not saying it's the fastest or most elegant piece of software that's even been written, but in my experience, it does a more than adequate job of allowing me to selectively decide what media (apps, music, video, etc.) that I want to have loaded on each of my devices, using one unified interface. For me, it works as advertised, and the only thing that really sucks about using it is the need to plug in a USB cable in order to sync, and this requirement will be going away with the advent of iOS 5.

Of course, the real strength of iTunes is the underlying ecosystem. What other mobile platform provides such a comprehensive, convenient means to legally acquire such a wide array of digital content (apps, music, movies, TV shows, e-books), all using one unified user account?

To me, any program that you can't remove is bloatware, so apps like the stock checker or note pad that you can't even hide on the home screen (as far as I know anyway) are just as bad as Verizon including a Blockbuster app.


Really? This handful of relatively small, innocuous apps that the OS developer (Apple) has decided make part of the core OS, are the same thing as commercially-branded crapware that your carrier (not your OS developer) has decided to arbitrarily lock onto your device, strictly for promotional purposes, or in exchange for payola from one or more third-parties? I guess I don't see them as exactly equivalent.

I iTunes is terrible for managing the device - I consistently lose apps and media content whenever I plug my iPhone in to an authorized computer.


"Consistently lose apps and media content"? Seriously? Very odd. I've used iTunes quite heavily to manage a couple different iPods and three different iPhones over the past several years, and the number of instances I've seen of what you describe: zero. Nor have I really heard of anyone else having this sort of "consistent" problem with iTunes.

The solution to virtually any stability problem with iOS devices is either wipe or replace. Not exactly the kind of rock-solid stability mt8thsw9th discusses.


Again, I've never had to wipe or replace an iOS device due to "stability problems". Not once. In my experience, "rock-solid stability" is a pretty good general assessment of iOS devices, as well as of the OS itself.

Edited by Gorton Fisherman, 30 August 2011 - 06:56 AM.


#43 ShaneTrot

  • 4,526 posts

Posted 30 August 2011 - 09:05 AM

Wow.

To me, that is without a doubt the absolute worst aspect of owning an iPhone or iPad. iTunes is just beyond awful.

How so? I have heard this before and it's a mystery to me. As well as my music, I am always listening to podcasts, audiobooks from Audible, iTunes U lectures, I have TV shows and 278 apps. As of this morning I have 58 podcasts, 721 songs, all the apps, 26 videos, 2 audiobooks and 16 iBooks on my phone. I make smart playlists, and I download new podcasts daily. How hard is that? If I had an individual app for each media type, I would go insane.

I will say that I have taken to listening to Slacker, Pandora and TuneIn Radio for music.

#44 mt8thsw9th


  • anti-SoSHal


  • 14,130 posts

Posted 30 August 2011 - 09:31 AM

I've been using iTunes since my first iPod in 2004. While it's not perfect, I've much preferred it to just dumping files into a folder on my phone as I did with my BlackBerrys and Droid. Things are organized and I have direct access to iTunes. I can also sort my apps through it. Non-iTunes podcasts I've subscribed to have been handled seamlessly by iTunes. What exactly are people looking for it to do or not do?

#45 PBDWake

  • 2,784 posts

Posted 30 August 2011 - 09:47 AM

I've been using iTunes since my first iPod in 2004. While it's not perfect, I've much preferred it to just dumping files into a folder on my phone as I did with my BlackBerrys and Droid. Things are organized and I have direct access to iTunes. I can also sort my apps through it. Non-iTunes podcasts I've subscribed to have been handled seamlessly by iTunes. What exactly are people looking for it to do or not do?


While I love my iPhone, I'm not a huge iTunes fan. I would love to be able to sync my iPhone with iTunes across multiple computers that have my iTunes account on them without losing my files. It's not really, to me, a huge thing to ask them to be able to just download whatever's on my phone to my computer, and upload whatever's on that computer to my phone as well. It does it whenever I purchase songs and apps through my phone and sends them back to my home computer. But it's annoying that if I ever go on the road for business, I can't sync it to my laptop and add something I download in the meantime.

#46 teddykgb

  • 3,650 posts

Posted 30 August 2011 - 09:59 AM

I think a lot of the iTunes hate spawns from the days when people used things like Winamp and more folder based storage. The transition to let iTunes manage your music and its location(s) was a very hard one to make for many, myself included, and the system sort of makes it absurd to a computer savvy person who wants to put one specific song onto their ipod but instead of just dragging it from a location they know to their device, they have to import it into itunes, make sure it is checked, then sync the entire device, which anyone who has used an iphone can tell you can take quite a long time, especially if you've updated apps over wifi directly on your device.

And of course it is sort of absurd, but it's also sort of a small price to pay for a lot of the great things that iTunes does. It's just that if you've got that mentality iTunes pretty consistently seems like overkill.

#47 PBDWake

  • 2,784 posts

Posted 30 August 2011 - 10:31 AM

Yeah. My disappointment in iTunes really doesn't extend to my iPhone, which I love, and the shortcomings I dislike shouldn't effect corporate use of the phones.

#48 dcdrew10

  • 938 posts

Posted 30 August 2011 - 10:50 AM

Of course, the real strength of iTunes is the underlying ecosystem. What other mobile platform provides such a comprehensive, convenient means to legally acquire such a wide array of digital content (apps, music, movies, TV shows, e-books), all using one unified user account?



"Consistently lose apps and media content"? Seriously? Very odd. I've used iTunes quite heavily to manage a couple different iPods and three different iPhones over the past several years, and the number of instances I've seen of what you describe: zero. Nor have I really heard of anyone else having this sort of "consistent" problem with iTunes.



Again, I've never had to wipe or replace an iOS device due to "stability problems". Not once. In my experience, "rock-solid stability" is a pretty good general assessment of iOS devices, as well as of the OS itself.


I second the bold section. To pull anything into my Android device I have to go into my file system and then import it to DoubleTwist then transfer it to my phone. iTunes already pulls my podcasts and audiobooks off the web, it automatically rips a CD I put in and is the download center for the Digital Copy of legally purchased Blu-Ray/DVD/Digital Copy movies. All my media is already there with no extra steps. I have had three media management systems for portable electronic devices iTunes, DoubleTwist, and whatever ran my Rio One in 2001 and iTunes was by far the best. My 4 year old uses iTunes to listen to music, so it can't be that hard to use. Also most people already have an iPod (the market share is around 75% as of 2010) so it should be familiar and it's not much of a step for them to add their phone to their iTunes. DoubleTwist's one advantage is you can use the same device on multiple computers, but with Cloud syncing that is not going to be an issue any more.

I have 3 iPods, and iPad my wife and kid each have one and we have never had a problem with stability in the 7+ years of using iPods.

Edited by dcdrew10, 30 August 2011 - 10:56 AM.


#49 zenter


  • slumdog idol


  • 4,799 posts

Posted 30 August 2011 - 11:04 AM

"Consistently lose apps and media content"? Seriously? Very odd. I've used iTunes quite heavily to manage a couple different iPods and three different iPhones over the past several years, and the number of instances I've seen of what you describe: zero. Nor have I really heard of anyone else having this sort of "consistent" problem with iTunes.

Yes, I do consistently lose content from my iPhone whenever I plug-in. This is not hyperbole. Just last week, I (successfully) downloaded several podcast episodes to the iPhone for a trip, but then charged by hooking up to my computer. By the time I hit the car, I lost every single device-downloaded podcast. Luckily, my Android phone doesn't have the 20MB download limit and I was able to download en-route.

Before you ask, the iPhone and iTunes are not set to synch. I do plug into other computers, but (again) I disabled synch, so nothing should be lost. It simply loses stuff upon plugging into a computer. Routinely. Standard solutions (de-authorizing/re-authorizing, uninstall/reinstall iTunes, etc) don't work. The only suggested "solution" by the Apple smarty-pants is... you guessed it - wipe and start over. I tried that, but it still didn't fix my issues. I did lose my awesome Skee-Ball record that way, though.

Again, I've never had to wipe or replace an iOS device due to "stability problems". Not once. In my experience, "rock-solid stability" is a pretty good general assessment of iOS devices, as well as of the OS itself.

I had to replace a 2.5G 64GB iTouch because it suddenly decided to stop interfacing with ANY iTunes instance. I lost a good deal of data/playlists/etc that way.

Look, I'm not saying everyone has had the same luck as me. I'm saying that the i-ecosystem is just as unreliable as many other ecosystems. And I'm not an Apple hater either...

The thing I give Apple over just about any other company is customer service. They have people I can talk to, and they will gladly replace broken devices with little hassle (within the AppleCare period, of course). I still think the iTouch is quite nearly the best non-cellular MID out there.

That all said, while the iPhone is just fine as a corporate phone, I believe it's not the best. In fact, upon further reflection I think it and Android might be overkill - one of the new Bberrys might do the corporate job just as well while being a less-distracting alternative.

Edited by zenter, 30 August 2011 - 11:06 AM.


#50 Gorton Fisherman

  • 913 posts

Posted 30 August 2011 - 11:06 AM

While I love my iPhone, I'm not a huge iTunes fan. I would love to be able to sync my iPhone with iTunes across multiple computers that have my iTunes account on them without losing my files. It's not really, to me, a huge thing to ask them to be able to just download whatever's on my phone to my computer, and upload whatever's on that computer to my phone as well. It does it whenever I purchase songs and apps through my phone and sends them back to my home computer. But it's annoying that if I ever go on the road for business, I can't sync it to my laptop and add something I download in the meantime.


Actually that's a fair point... hopefully this limitation will be going away with the advent of iCloud/iOS 5, where the whole concept is that the "cloud" now becomes the master repository...