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SoSH Running Dogs 2011 Run To 100k Training Thread


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#101 NortheasternPJ


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Posted 02 January 2011 - 09:44 AM

This may belong in the iPhone/Android apps threads as well, but RunKeeper Pro, normally a $10 app, is free through the end of January.


According to this app I just ran 4.27 miles, according to gmap pedometer I ran 4.7. That's a pretty big difference, I'm going to have to drive it out today. Anyone have any experience with it?

Edit: Just did the milage in my car and it came out at 4.5 on the dot. I guess that's the number I'll use. i'm interested to test this some more and see if its consistently short.

Edited by NortheasternPJ, 02 January 2011 - 12:27 PM.


#102 JGray38

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Posted 02 January 2011 - 04:32 PM

Look at the map it creates. You'll find that it can and will cut corners, drawing straight lines between signals. I used it for a while and found it to be routinely off by .2-.4 miles on my 6 mile run. You can edit the map, though it can be a pain. Once you figure out the correct distance create a route for that run.

#103 Trautwein's Degree


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Posted 02 January 2011 - 04:46 PM

If you are overweight, it's best to start dropping rate before you really start running. Running is a screwy thing. One of the reasons we're born to run is that our bodies use calories very efficiently. Running will make you hungry. Running may allow you to think that because you're doing it you can eat more than you really should. Very roughly, running burns about 100 calories a mile. Walking also burns 100 calories per mile. Running will burn more calories per mile but not that much more.

Here's the bottom line, right now you may not be able to run a mile or if you can it's all you got and maybe more. My advice is to start walking. Here's why in 30 minutes you should be able to walk 2 miles (that's 200 calories) as opposed to running one mile which is 100 calories. Walking isn't sexy advice but it's your friend and great cross training once you get running.

Walk 5 times a week for 30 to 60 minutes. Vary the times to give yourself some variety. Do this for 4 to 6 weeks before you start a couch to 5k program. Now is the time to work on your diet. Join weight watchers and lose some of those pounds now. That way when you start running it'll be easier because (1) you're carrying less weight; (2) you've got yourself in a routine of moving for 30 to 60 minutes for 5 days a week; (3) the walking will have significant benefits for both your muscles and you cardio vascular health.

Once you've done this then start a couch to 5k program. You'll still have plenty of time to get yourself in shape for a fall half marathon. Plenty. It goes without saying that before you begin running you should consult with a doctor. Consider purchasing a heart rate monitor. Quality monitors generally run about $30. Polar and Timex both make good ones.

#104 Trautwein's Degree


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Posted 02 January 2011 - 04:53 PM

John Bingham "The Penguin" is a hero to many. He's the author of the "Courage to Start" and "No Need for Speed". Here's one of his Runner's World Columns. Check out the rest here.

There's a quote by William Purkey, a well-known professor of education, that goes, "Dance like no one is watching, love like you'll never be hurt, sing like no one is listening, and live like it's heaven on earth." It seems like the perfect life philosophy—and one I've learned to apply to running over the years. I run like no one is watching, even when I'm racing with 35,000 people. I'm usually having so much fun, I simply don't care what anyone else thinks.

But I didn't always feel this way. In my early days, when I weighed 240 pounds, I ran like everyone was watching—and judging. If I was on a run and saw a car approaching, I'd stop and pretend I was looking for something I'd lost.

I was so concerned with what other people thought of me that by the time I did open up about running, I constantly worried whether I was living up to their expectations. My first coach put me on a treadmill, dialed up the pace to 9:20 per mile, and said to run for 40 minutes. I tried and, not surprisingly, failed. I couldn't help but be disappointed in myself—even though I knew what he was asking was nearly impossible for me.

I even dressed like people were watching. I bought the high-tech gear and sleek clothes that I thought would make people believe I was a runner—even if I felt like an imposter in them. And I didn't have a clue if the expensive shoes I was wearing were the right kind for me—I just wanted to look like I fit in with this group.

To be honest, I felt a certain satisfaction in believing that someone was watching. I really thought that other people cared about my performance. The best example of this was a combined, two-lap marathon and half in Florence, Italy. As I neared the finish line, the crowd began to cheer. I was astounded. Here I was, thousands of miles from home, and the Italians were yelling for "Il Penguino."

About 20 yards from the finish, the truth set in when the winner of the full marathon went past me as I was finishing the half-marathon. No one was cheering for me. No one probably even noticed that I was finishing. I couldn't help but smile at my own illusion of self-importance.

That's when I realized I had been running for every reason except the right one. I ran to make other people happy, ran to live up to their expectations. But that didn't matter. No one was watching—no one cared. So I decided I was going to run for me—just me—and gained a new enjoyment from the sport I hadn't truly experienced yet. That doesn't mean I don't want to improve or sometimes wish I could run faster. It just means that the joy I feel when I'm moving my body with my own two feet is so great that the act alone is satisfying enough. I've learned to run like no one is watching.

So if you see me at a race, and I look like a 60-year-old guy waddling along, don't worry. I'm fine. I'm better than fine. I'm happy. You see, I remember those words that first appeared here 13 years ago: "The miracle isn't that I finished. The miracle is that I had the courage to start."

Waddle on, friends.



#105 Trautwein's Degree


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Posted 02 January 2011 - 04:57 PM

I hope you've told some people that you're doing this. If not, please do. You are now a runner. There is one rule that I've found to be true it's that only non-runners will discourage you. Experienced runners will help you. Well you have the energy now, telling people about your goal is one of the ways to maintain motivated over the next 10 months on those days you'd just rather surf SoSH.

#106 Trautwein's Degree


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Posted 02 January 2011 - 05:04 PM

Other ways to stay motivated:

1. If you still have $12 burning a hole in your pocket from Christmas, consider subscribing to Runners World. The articles are good. At one time or another pretty much every runner subscribes.

2. Make a small donation to yourself on your Jimmy Fund page. Donate $10 to yourself. It'll feel good and help you to feel invested.

3. Get a paper calendar, make a plan, and put it on your fridge. If you don't have individual goals (e.g. run 3 miles on Tuesday) it's damn near impossible to reach your larger goals because it's so easy to put it off. Each week I put my workout schedule into google calendar and have it text me when I get up in the morning. It's just a reminder of my commitment.

#107 luckysox


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Posted 03 January 2011 - 08:02 AM

Thanks for all the advice, Traut.

#108 ( . ) ( . ) and (_!_)


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Posted 03 January 2011 - 10:05 AM

I have something going on with my feet when I run. I suspect the easy answer here is get better shoes, but I want to inquire here anyway.

When I go for a long run, my left foot (and occasionally my right foot) feels numb, like it has fallen asleep. Usually this happens pretty far into the run. It happened yesterday after about 4-5 miles of an 8 mile run. Usually I just slow down or walk for a minute, the feeling comes back and I am fine to continue. Anyone ever hear of anything like this? Is it a sign of a more serious problem?

Like I said I suspect its my shoes. But on that end I am getting new shoes as a birthday present this coming weekend and I am planning on going to a expert running store to finally get tested/fitted. Thanks.

#109 JGray38

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Posted 03 January 2011 - 10:26 AM

Make sure your laces aren't too tight, especially at the front of the foot. Sounds stupid, but I'm serious. Better shoes/better fitting sounds like a good way to go. Do you experience any tightness in your calves before the numbness? A search on Runner's World Forums brings back amegathread about this.

#110 ookami7m

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Posted 03 January 2011 - 10:37 AM

So I attempted to start Couch to 5k today. 15 minutes in my shins hurt so damn bad I could barely walk. clearly I didn't stretch enough, but hot fuck did it hurt. Suggestions for how to make that easier on a fat guy?

#111 sass a thon

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Posted 03 January 2011 - 11:11 AM

So I attempted to start Couch to 5k today. 15 minutes in my shins hurt so damn bad I could barely walk. clearly I didn't stretch enough, but hot fuck did it hurt. Suggestions for how to make that easier on a fat guy?


Shin splints are just one of those things that every new runners is destined to experience. They will eventually go away and there are exercises you can do to ease the pain and keep them at bay. I can't remember exactly where they were posted, but check back through this thread and the other Running Dogs thread. I think Fris originally posted them.

#112 sass a thon

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Posted 03 January 2011 - 11:17 AM

My tip of the day for anyone with aches, pains, or general soreness: invest in a foam roller. Using a foam roller on your calves, hips, IT Band, etc can be extremely helpful. You can buy one at a running store or online (I got mine from Amazon).

Here are a couple articles/videos:

Intro to Foam Rollers

The (almost) Magical Foam Roller

Runners World: Videos

#113 ( . ) ( . ) and (_!_)


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Posted 03 January 2011 - 11:51 AM

Make sure your laces aren't too tight, especially at the front of the foot. Sounds stupid, but I'm serious. Better shoes/better fitting sounds like a good way to go. Do you experience any tightness in your calves before the numbness? A search on Runner's World Forums brings back amegathread about this.


Thanks for posting that thread, it's a jungle but I found some decent ideas in there.

I do not notice the calf tightness as I run, but when I first start running my calves would be so tight afterwards the next day that I could barely walk. I resolved that issue by doing some extra stretching before and after, paying particular attention to my calves. They still feel very tight after a run, but are no longer unmanageable. I also suffer from shin splits that are getting better. I am hoping the new shoes will help to further relieve the strain on my calves/shins and in turn help with the numbness.

The other interesting thing is the laces. I bought a little silicon pouch to hold a Nike+ chip to help measure my runs. It weaves into my laces, on my left shoe. I have at times felt numbness in my right foot, but it's mainly the left that bothers me. I suspect that the chip might be drawing the laces tighter, also contributing to the numbness. I will try the chip on the other show and see what happens.

Thanks!

#114 Trautwein's Degree


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Posted 03 January 2011 - 12:15 PM

With shin splints, I'm a big fan of (1) ice and (2) taking a stick (a rolling pin would also work) and rolling it over the shin. This may hurt like hell but it will eventually release the muscle.

#115 Frisbetarian


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Posted 03 January 2011 - 12:16 PM

So I attempted to start Couch to 5k today. 15 minutes in my shins hurt so damn bad I could barely walk. clearly I didn't stretch enough, but hot fuck did it hurt. Suggestions for how to make that easier on a fat guy?


http://sonsofsamhorn...ost__p__3275433

Works for just about everyone.

#116 sass a thon

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Posted 04 January 2011 - 09:50 AM

If anyone is in need of shoes and already knows what works for them, Running Warehouse is having a pretty sweet clearance sale. Sizes and styles are limited.

Women's Closeouts

Men's Closeouts

#117 ibrewbeer

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Posted 04 January 2011 - 06:51 PM

ok, mutha frackies.....I ran out of excuses, and today i knocked out my first step in C25K.
Got a new pair of shoes from the local running store experts...Asics or someshit. they were pricey so they must be good. Told the guy i need shoes for a fat man...he sold me something with support and cushion...gots to tell you, it felt like i was floating on air...never even thought about my feet...maybe because my back hurt so damn much...also, in conjunction with the c25k program, i ran Nike+ in the background

one step at a time

Next work out will be in Texas with my brother from another mother BOOGER on Thursday....

#118 luckysox


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Posted 05 January 2011 - 09:50 AM

If anyone is in need of shoes and already knows what works for them, Running Warehouse is having a pretty sweet clearance sale. Sizes and styles are limited.

Women's Closeouts

Men's Closeouts


thanks!!! holy cheap NB 1064's!

#119 ookami7m

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Posted 05 January 2011 - 11:15 AM

http://sonsofsamhorn.net/topic/19148-sosh-running-dogs/page__view__findpost__p__3275433

Works for just about everyone.


Holy cow, thanks Fris. That helped a ton with today's run. I stretched like you said yesterday and then a lighter set before I ran today. Much less pain.

#120 ookami7m

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Posted 05 January 2011 - 11:17 AM

Successfully completed Week 1 Day 1 of Couch to 5k with much less pain. Felt really good to hear "you have completed this workout" when I got to the end. This will get easier guys. One thing I remember now from a past life where I was actually in shape - the first few weeks are hardest. Once you get in a rhythm it will keep you moving.

#121 NortheasternPJ


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Posted 06 January 2011 - 09:01 AM

So I think I'm going to officially join this thread. I've been running casually (2-3 miles a couple days a week) for the last couple years. I have gotten hurt a couple times due to freak injuries, rolled my ankle twice and almost broke it then playing Frisbee pulled my quad so bad it hurt for 13 weeks. For the last 6-8 weeks I've been slowly upping my frequency and mileage. Never thought of doing a half until this thread. Looking at the Novice Half Mile Training Guide posted earlier, its pretty much what I've been doing anyways.

I just got back from a 6.1 mile run which I ran at a 8:35 pace. Felt great the whole time and that's the longest I've run in probably 2.5 years. I ran 5 miles about a week ago which felt great too. I'm going to look for a half in May or June probably and see how it goes. Only thing that worries me is if I can keep going through in the drecks of Feb. when its 8 degrees out for 2 weeks in a row.

#122 ( . ) ( . ) and (_!_)


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Posted 06 January 2011 - 09:29 AM

So I think I'm going to officially join this thread. I've been running casually (2-3 miles a couple days a week) for the last couple years. I have gotten hurt a couple times due to freak injuries, rolled my ankle twice and almost broke it then playing Frisbee pulled my quad so bad it hurt for 13 weeks. For the last 6-8 weeks I've been slowly upping my frequency and mileage. Never thought of doing a half until this thread. Looking at the Novice Half Mile Training Guide posted earlier, its pretty much what I've been doing anyways.

I just got back from a 6.1 mile run which I ran at a 8:35 pace. Felt great the whole time and that's the longest I've run in probably 2.5 years. I ran 5 miles about a week ago which felt great too. I'm going to look for a half in May or June probably and see how it goes. Only thing that worries me is if I can keep going through in the drecks of Feb. when its 8 degrees out for 2 weeks in a row.


I signed up for the Boston's Run to Remember half marathon on May 29th. If you are looking for one in Boston then check it out. The course looks pretty great, you see a lot of the city.

#123 sass a thon

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Posted 06 January 2011 - 09:42 AM

So I think I'm going to officially join this thread. I've been running casually (2-3 miles a couple days a week) for the last couple years. I have gotten hurt a couple times due to freak injuries, rolled my ankle twice and almost broke it then playing Frisbee pulled my quad so bad it hurt for 13 weeks. For the last 6-8 weeks I've been slowly upping my frequency and mileage. Never thought of doing a half until this thread. Looking at the Novice Half Mile Training Guide posted earlier, its pretty much what I've been doing anyways.

I just got back from a 6.1 mile run which I ran at a 8:35 pace. Felt great the whole time and that's the longest I've run in probably 2.5 years. I ran 5 miles about a week ago which felt great too. I'm going to look for a half in May or June probably and see how it goes. Only thing that worries me is if I can keep going through in the drecks of Feb. when its 8 degrees out for 2 weeks in a row.


Sounds like you are in fantastic shape and are more than ready to train for a half. You're MUCH farther along (and much faster) than I was when I started in 2007. Welcome aboard!

#124 NortheasternPJ


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Posted 06 January 2011 - 10:35 AM

Sounds like you are in fantastic shape and are more than ready to train for a half. You're MUCH farther along (and much faster) than I was when I started in 2007. Welcome aboard!


Thanks. I'm in pretty good running shape but I'm still about 16 pounds over my ideal weight. Hoping that this gets me down to where I want to be again. Too long of just eating and drinking too much. Now I'm off diet cokes/caffeine and running more and I feel better than I have in a long time.

Anyone have any suggestions on a good half marathon around May/Early June around Mass? I am looking at the Boston 13.1 but that's the last weekend of June. I'd prefer to do one a bit before that due to the possibility of high temps.

#125 bosoxgrl


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Posted 06 January 2011 - 11:27 AM

Anyone have any suggestions on a good half marathon around May/Early June around Mass? I am looking at the Boston 13.1 but that's the last weekend of June. I'd prefer to do one a bit before that due to the possibility of high temps.


Here you go:

Providence, May 1

#126 Jim Ed Rice in HOF


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Posted 06 January 2011 - 12:48 PM

Anyone have any suggestions on a good half marathon around May/Early June around Mass? I am looking at the Boston 13.1 but that's the last weekend of June. I'd prefer to do one a bit before that due to the possibility of high temps.

Another May 1 race, this one in Hampton, NH Wallis Sands Half Marathon.

I'm contemplating entering this one a month earlier in Newmarket, NH Great Bay Half.

#127 Trautwein's Degree


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Posted 06 January 2011 - 03:09 PM

Here you go:

Providence, May 1


Providence was a nice half course. It's pretty much rolling hills through some really nice neighborhoods in North Providence, into Pawtucket, along the water, and back into downtown.

Here's what'll greet you post race:
Posted Image

#128 24JoshuaPoint


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Posted 06 January 2011 - 03:22 PM

Here's what'll greet you post race:


I heard a rumor there is beer too. Is that true?

#129 Trautwein's Degree


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Posted 06 January 2011 - 03:26 PM

I heard a rumor there is beer too. Is that true?

Yes. That brings up a good point. At the end of most "larger" and many smaller half marathons there is free beer.

#130 NortheasternPJ


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Posted 06 January 2011 - 07:15 PM

Great suggestion guys. I was talking to my younger sister today about it, she lives in Stamford, CT and was complaining about the races around there. So she's going to sign up as well and we'll both do the Providence. Now I've heard Pizza and Beer, even better. I try to run the Harpoon 5 miler every year for that reason. I'll join the SoSH group and all that tonight.

This is great motivation and a great idea. 5 days ago I would have never thought I could do a half marathon. Now I'm almost half way to the mileage and have a good plan on how to get there. I've never run more than 7 miles so I'll soon be in uncharted territory.

#131 Trautwein's Degree


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Posted 06 January 2011 - 10:24 PM

Great suggestion guys. I was talking to my younger sister today about it, she lives in Stamford, CT and was complaining about the races around there. So she's going to sign up as well and we'll both do the Providence. Now I've heard Pizza and Beer, even better. I try to run the Harpoon 5 miler every year for that reason. I'll join the SoSH group and all that tonight.

This is great motivation and a great idea. 5 days ago I would have never thought I could do a half marathon. Now I'm almost half way to the mileage and have a good plan on how to get there. I've never run more than 7 miles so I'll soon be in uncharted territory.


The satisfaction of setting personal distance records is significant. Every week you enter unchartered territory. In a few weeks, you'll look back and say "I'm only doing 7 today".

#132 d.ro.ho

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Posted 06 January 2011 - 10:50 PM

I'm contemplating entering this one a month earlier in Newmarket, NH Great Bay Half.

I'd highly recommend the Great Bay Half marathon. I did it two years ago and had a blast, despite being apprehensive about signing up when a friend dragged me into it. Granted, it is the only one I have ever done, so I don't have much to compare it to. However, a big chunk of the race is on winding back roads (some dirt) along the marshes/coast, so the scenery is terrific. It was a cool scene - every mile or so locals were out playing instruments to cheer you along. There was a cello/violin duo, a dude playing the banjo, and even a bunch of punk ass 15 year olds rocking out with electric guitars in their driveway. Passing these folks definitely helped keep your spirits up. Early April is early, but it kept me moving in the darkest days of the winter.

#133 24JoshuaPoint


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Posted 07 January 2011 - 08:55 AM

So she's going to sign up as well and we'll both do the Providence.


Excellent. My plan is to run providence as well to aid in partaking of said free beer.

#134 rbeaud

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Posted 07 January 2011 - 09:19 AM

Great suggestion guys. I was talking to my younger sister today about it, she lives in Stamford, CT and was complaining about the races around there. So she's going to sign up as well and we'll both do the Providence. Now I've heard Pizza and Beer, even better. I try to run the Harpoon 5 miler every year for that reason. I'll join the SoSH group and all that tonight.


I'n curious about your sister's complaints. In Orange, I've rarely driven more than 15 minutes to run a race (albeit mostly 5-10k). Lots of fun, flat races in New Haven and Fairfield throughout the year. Generally, theHi Tek site shows most every race in CT.

And I'll second the Harpoon 5M. Loved it last year, though it was a tad humid, and will try to do it again.

#135 Jim Ed Rice in HOF


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Posted 07 January 2011 - 03:35 PM

I'd highly recommend the Great Bay Half marathon. I did it two years ago and had a blast, despite being apprehensive about signing up when a friend dragged me into it. Granted, it is the only one I have ever done, so I don't have much to compare it to. However, a big chunk of the race is on winding back roads (some dirt) along the marshes/coast, so the scenery is terrific. It was a cool scene - every mile or so locals were out playing instruments to cheer you along. There was a cello/violin duo, a dude playing the banjo, and even a bunch of punk ass 15 year olds rocking out with electric guitars in their driveway. Passing these folks definitely helped keep your spirits up. Early April is early, but it kept me moving in the darkest days of the winter.

Nice to hear that - thanks for the info. I live about 15 minutes from there so I'm familiar with at least part of the route but it's good to hear the folks living along the way get into it.

#136 Fo' Rheal

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Posted 07 January 2011 - 08:18 PM

I am officially halfway through the C25K program, and I just wanted to say the difference between Day 1 and today is unbelievable. I am floored. I started the program on December 11.

For those beginners, run-haters and people struggling at the beginning, I just want to say stick with it. It gets much less brutal and actually kind of enjoyable! I hated running and could barely run a half mile at a snail's pace. I hurt in places I didn't know it was possible to hurt. I was unmotivated. Now, I look forward to my workouts and have noticed I make it a tad further down the road in a little less time. The pain has subsided, thanks to SuperFeet, ice and stretching.

Edited by Fo' Rheal, 07 January 2011 - 08:19 PM.


#137 sass a thon

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Posted 07 January 2011 - 09:08 PM

I am officially halfway through the C25K program, and I just wanted to say the difference between Day 1 and today is unbelievable. I am floored. I started the program on December 11.

For those beginners, run-haters and people struggling at the beginning, I just want to say stick with it. It gets much less brutal and actually kind of enjoyable! I hated running and could barely run a half mile at a snail's pace. I hurt in places I didn't know it was possible to hurt. I was unmotivated. Now, I look forward to my workouts and have noticed I make it a tad further down the road in a little less time. The pain has subsided, thanks to SuperFeet, ice and stretching.


This is just so incredibly awesome. Congratulations to you. And the best part...it only gets better.

#138 24JoshuaPoint


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Posted 08 January 2011 - 01:32 AM

Fantastical. Posts like that inspire us. And fyi everyone that runs feels some sort of pain. You just have to know if its typical, bad, or good. Bc there will always be something (at least for me). Just keep truckin.

#139 Varitekstheman

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Posted 08 January 2011 - 06:07 PM

Week 1 of C25K is in the books. Overall, other than my glacial running speed, it wasn't too bad. I ran on the indoor track at work while we were closed so I didn't have to worry about any gawkers. Also, since I work at the gym, I sneak my dog in to jog alongside me, which is strangely motivating.

All week my actual jogging speed would have put me at about an 11.5-12 minute mile. This morning I ramped it up a bit for the last 4 jogging portions to about a 10 minute mile. So, that was kinda nice. Still obscenely slow, but not as profane as earlier in the week.

On days I am not doing C25K, I am doing the Spartacus workout with some co-workers. I have a lot of work ahead, since to get this thing done, I am realistically going to have to lose 40-50lbs.

On a related note, I am off to check into the Fatass thread...

#140 Trautwein's Degree


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Posted 08 January 2011 - 07:20 PM

Week 1 of C25K is in the books. Overall, other than my glacial running speed, it wasn't too bad. I ran on the indoor track at work while we were closed so I didn't have to worry about any gawkers. Also, since I work at the gym, I sneak my dog in to jog alongside me, which is strangely motivating.

All week my actual jogging speed would have put me at about an 11.5-12 minute mile. This morning I ramped it up a bit for the last 4 jogging portions to about a 10 minute mile. So, that was kinda nice. Still obscenely slow, but not as profane as earlier in the week.

On days I am not doing C25K, I am doing the Spartacus workout with some co-workers. I have a lot of work ahead, since to get this thing done, I am realistically going to have to lose 40-50lbs.

On a related note, I am off to check into the Fatass thread...


Don't worry about pace. Just keep moving. You just got through the toughest week of your training. Save this post. Read it the night before you complete your half marathon this fall.

#141 Trautwein's Degree


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Posted 08 January 2011 - 07:23 PM

I am officially halfway through the C25K program, and I just wanted to say the difference between Day 1 and today is unbelievable. I am floored. I started the program on December 11.

For those beginners, run-haters and people struggling at the beginning, I just want to say stick with it. It gets much less brutal and actually kind of enjoyable! I hated running and could barely run a half mile at a snail's pace. I hurt in places I didn't know it was possible to hurt. I was unmotivated. Now, I look forward to my workouts and have noticed I make it a tad further down the road in a little less time. The pain has subsided, thanks to SuperFeet, ice and stretching.


Starting is the hardest part. Couch to 5k pushes you just hard enough. I'll never forget when it said "run for a half hour". I thought I was going to die.

#142 NortheasternPJ


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Posted 09 January 2011 - 03:19 PM

I sneak my dog in to jog alongside me, which is strangely motivating.



I agree, I run with my dog all the time. I'm going to start having to leave her at home or drop her off half way on longer runs. she's a mut but can easily run 6 miles with me. I don't want to take her longer since I'm afraid of her joints etc. But running with a dog is great, I always have a training partner and she always wants to run a good pace. She never complains either. She does love squirrels a bit too much though.

#143 One Red Seat

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Posted 09 January 2011 - 03:49 PM

Starting is the hardest part. Couch to 5k pushes you just hard enough. I'll never forget when it said "run for a half hour". I thought I was going to die.

I did day 1 of week 2 yesterday. It didn't kill me but it pushed me fairly hard and I did find myself wondering...how the f am I ever going to run for a half hour straight. I just don't see it but am sticking with it and hope to be proved wrong.

I also have a couple of stupid questions...

1. At the end of the program now, it ends with a walk of 1 minute. The alternating walk/run then ends and it tells you to "cool down" for 5 minutes. Is cool down anything other than just walking for another 5 minutes? At the end of the regular program, I am still 5-10 minutes from home, so I just walk the rest of the way. Am I supposed to do something else? Stretch again? Sit down? What is cool down?

2. The program is set up for 3x per week so I guess it assumes you rest 2 consective days i.e. Sat. & Sun. Is that right? Can I just run every other day leaving myself one day of rest always and thus ending up running 4 days every other week?

3. I know you are not supposed to push too far ahead of the program but...on off days, is brisk walk of 2 or so miles ok? Or is that not considered proper rest? I like to get outdoors and walk but don't want to negatively impact my ability to be rested for and complete the running program.

Thanks for the help.

#144 crescd215

  • 328 posts

Posted 09 January 2011 - 05:12 PM

2. The program is set up for 3x per week so I guess it assumes you rest 2 consective days i.e. Sat. & Sun. Is that right? Can I just run every other day leaving myself one day of rest always and thus ending up running 4 days every other week?


I have a similar question. The program I'm using has two medium distance days during the week with a long distance on Saturday. How detrimental is it to postpone the long run until Sunday, giving only one day of rest instead of two until the next week's schedule begins?

#145 Fo' Rheal

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Posted 09 January 2011 - 05:49 PM

[quote name='One Red Seat' timestamp='1294606198' post='3327744']
I did day 1 of week 2 yesterday. It didn't kill me but it pushed me fairly hard and I did find myself wondering...how the f am I ever going to run for a half hour straight. I just don't see it but am sticking with it and hope to be proved wrong.

I am right there with you, but somehow, you just do it. When I started Week 4 and the five minute runs, I was looking around for Candid Camera. I've finished Week 4 and my lardass that struggled with the 90 second runs can now bang out a 5 minute one. It really is pretty cool.

I can't help with your other 2 questions, but I can speak to #3. I run every other day and hadn't been doing anything in between. Yesterday, (off day) I decided to do some "light" cardio, so I did a half hour on the eliptical. I woke up this morning and my legs felt like two cement pillars attached to my hips. Needless to say, today's C25K workout wasn't my best effort. I think it varies from person to person - try a walk and if your runs suffer a bit, maybe dial back the off-day workouts.

#146 ookami7m

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Posted 10 January 2011 - 08:58 AM

I did day 1 week 2 of c25k today and I too was wondering how I could run for a half hour. But after a shower and recovery a bit I know I can do this. And to whoever above said they had a glacial pace - I did 1.99 miles in 30 minutes. I'm not worried about pace though - just finishing.


On a side note and az runners in here interested in doing Pat's Run in April? My office has a team that I'm helping organize

#147 ookami7m

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Posted 10 January 2011 - 09:00 AM

For those that want to see glacial check out my rubkeeper charts here. http://rnkpr.com/adnskw

#148 Trautwein's Degree


  • a Connecticut bicycle attorney in General Motor's Court


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Posted 10 January 2011 - 12:16 PM

We now have 26 people signed up. That's a total of $13,000.00 pledged for the Jimmy Fund. Outstanding. Keep on keeping at it. As you sit here in January, imagine yourself crossing the finish line wearing a Dana Farber singlet and how that's going to feel. Let that thought carry you to the next telephone pole or the next walk break.

#149 Trautwein's Degree


  • a Connecticut bicycle attorney in General Motor's Court


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Posted 10 January 2011 - 03:20 PM

Orange Julia just sent me a link to the Providence Rock n Roll Half Marathon on August 7, 2011. It's the first year of the event. I figured this may be of interest to some folks.

#150 bgo544

  • 420 posts

Posted 11 January 2011 - 10:11 PM

Thanks to Traut and the rest of you for getting me off my butt and running again for the first time in 15 years. My goal is a 10k on April 30 that is being run in conjunction with the relatively new Illinois Marathon.

And the motivation is contagious. My wife is now registered for the 5k, and my 3-year-old son will do the 1k "fun run". My wife told her friends, and so far 3 of them have joined in for the 5k, including a woman who is about to give birth any day now. And 5 of my son's little friends will now be running the 1k with him. My wife's sister and her fiance are thinking of flying out here and doing the 10k with me.

So I started training of the weekend, running on our treadmill in the basement. Did 1.5 miles of run/walk intervals on Saturday, and 3.5 miles of the same yesterday. So far so good.