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SoSH Running Dogs 2011 Run To 100k Training Thread


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#1 Trautwein's Degree


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Posted 07 December 2010 - 02:00 PM

First, if you haven't already, please sign up for the group with the Jimmy Fund by clicking here. There is no financial consequence for doing so. They don't take your credit card and the process will take you all of 5 minutes. Once you've done this, you've set up your personal fundraising page. That's where you will raise all of your funds for this challenge. $500 per member is our goal. If you raise that money, you will get a Dana Farber/SoSH running shirt for your race. Do not start raising money on that page if you intend to run the BAA Boston Half Marathon in the fall. In all likelyhood, raising $500 will get you race entry there and a shirt but sit tight for now as far as fundraising goes.

We're getting a lot of questions in the other thread about where to start. If you are new to this or running a half marathon (13.1 miles) seems like an unreachable goal - have faith. You will cross that finish line. We will help get you there regardless of how out of shape you are. You will surprise yourself and one day, you may even say "I'm just doing 13 today".

Here are the first steps that you need to take to get to the finish line in October.

1. Sign up for the Jimmy Fund Group;

2. Sign up for the Daily Mile. The Daily Mile is a social training site where members post training, get feedback, and encouragement. The community is very positive. Do NOT worry for one second about what your running times are. Join the SoSH Running Dogs Group on Daily Mile and send friend requests to members. Logging your workouts and sharing them will improve both your training and commitment. The only people who judge runners are non-runners. You'll find the running community and our Running Dogs members very generous with their advice and encouragement.

3. Go to a running store and get fitted for shoes. Dicks is not a running store. Somewhere near where you live is a store that specializes in running shoes and gear. It's staffed by runners. Go there. Get fitted properly for shoes. Try on several pairs - run with them. If they don't work - take them back. I can't tell you how many new runners get discouraged because they get injured because they aren't wearing the right shoes for them. There are lots of good brands and makes - find one that's right for you. Do not take those old shoes out of the closet and try and start training with them. Good running shoes will cost you anywhere between $70 and $120. Make it your gift to yourself. There's no shortage of running gear on the market, most of it you can do without, but the proper shoes are a necessity.

4. Start thinking hard about your fall race. Think about where and when you want to run. Whether you're running a race near your house or traveling some distance - there are no shortage of great races in the fall. You can find one that works for you. Here's where I'm asking you to take a leap of faith. A giant leap of faith. The reason runners run races has nothing to do with winning them. Races are large goals. Those goals will provide focus and motivation for you to train. Knowing you're going to run a half marathon is what gets your butt out the door. Once you've found your race, if registration is open, strongly consider registering. If registration is not open, mark the day on the calendar that it opens and sign up on the first day. Doing so will strengthen your commitment and is a significant step to crossing that finish line. Let us know in this race what race you are doing. You'll be amazed what this will do for you.

The general arch of this training will go something like this. Pick out a spring 5k. There is a race near you. Saint Patrick's Day is sort of the opening day of racing season in the Northeast. These races are fun and almost always end with beer. St. Patrick's Day is the perfect amount of time it's going to take you to go from couch to 5k. Let us know what 5k you're considering or if you don't know of one we'll help you find one. Sign up for a race!

Half marathon training programs generally span about 12 weeks give or take. You should start your half marathon training in the summer (likely July). When you start the program, you'll need a base. We'll get you there. A base for a half program is being able to run roughly 5 miles (I'm speaking very generally here) for your long run and maybe 10 miles in a week (these are rough estimates).

Sass a Thon's husband is a certified coach and is going to help us with specific training programs for you. Including how to bridge the gap between your 5k in March and your half in the fall.

Please post any questions you have about the goal of this fundraiser, running, gear, nutrition, and life in general in this thread. There's enough experience on this board to make a difference in your life. The SoSH Running Dogs are outstanding. Welcome.

Edited by Trautwein's Degree, 07 December 2010 - 02:15 PM.


#2 Trautwein's Degree


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Posted 07 December 2010 - 02:07 PM

You're going to start with couch to 5k. If you have an ipod or an iphone there are several apps that can help you. Here's a link to a basic couch to 5k program. The basics of couch to 5k are simple. The goal is to improve duration by combining running with walking while gradually increasing your running over time. Programs generally last about 9 weeks. THERE IS NO SHAME IN WALKING. WALKING IS GOOD. Feeling like you have to go out and run 2 miles to start is a recipe for failure. One it won't be fun for you, two you may get discouraged, and three you may get hurt. You'll be plenty ready to run your St. Patricks day 5k. A 5k is 3.1 miles.

The program is manageable and progressively pushes your comfort level. Stick with the program. People who think it's too easy are the ones who don't finish. Don't run extra. It says run 3 days a week - do it. If it starts out too easy, stick with it, and consider making the running portions of your program a little harder. But do walk. Over the 9 weeks you'll strengthen both your muscles and your CV health. You'll notice a difference. Just go step by step.

Edited by Trautwein's Degree, 07 December 2010 - 02:08 PM.


#3 ( . ) ( . ) and (_!_)


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Posted 07 December 2010 - 02:32 PM

3. Go to a running store and get fitted for shoes. Dicks is not a running store. Somewhere near where you live is a store that specializes in running shoes and gear. It's staffed by runners. Go there. Get fitted properly for shoes. Try on several pairs - run with them. If they don't work - take them back. I can't tell you how many new runners get discouraged because they get injured because they aren't wearing the right shoes for them. There are lots of good brands and makes - find one that's right for you. Do not take those old shoes out of the closet and try and start training with them. Good running shoes will cost you anywhere between $70 and $120. Make it your gift to yourself. There's no shortage of running gear on the market, most of it you can do without, but the proper shoes are a necessity.



(I thought it might be helpful to list some running stores)

This store has been recommended to me by several serious runners in Rhode Island Rhode Runner

#4 JGray38

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Posted 07 December 2010 - 03:23 PM

New England Running Co. in Beverly MA
Yankee Runner in Newburyport (can't find a site...)

#5 Trautwein's Degree


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Posted 07 December 2010 - 03:32 PM

I shop at Fleet Feet in West Hartford, CT.

#6 Trautwein's Degree


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Posted 07 December 2010 - 03:34 PM

There are a number of different race finder websites. None are comprehensive. Generally, I find Cool Running to be the best. You can search for all sorts of races on their site.

#7 sass a thon

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Posted 07 December 2010 - 03:51 PM

If anyone is on the fence about participating in this, please go ahead and do it. In 2007, my husband tried to convince me to join a program to train for a half marathon. At the time I could barely manage running to the end of the block and back, so it seemed laughable. I have asthma. I'm a terrible athlete. The only extracurricular I excelled at in high school and college was smoking pot. I never had a problem with weight but I do have a problem with laziness and the fact that I really love my couch and TV. But I went for it and can honestly say running has changed my life. Crossing a finish line is the most amazing feeling ever, no matter what the distance. The only thing you have to have in spades is the desire to do this - everything else can be learned and developed. Everything Ryan says is true about the supportive nature of Daily Mile; sign up and I promise we can help you accomplish your goal.

#8 TallerThanPedroia


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Posted 07 December 2010 - 04:08 PM

3. Go to a running store and get fitted for shoes. Dicks is not a running store. Somewhere near where you live is a store that specializes in running shoes and gear. It's staffed by runners. Go there. Get fitted properly for shoes. Try on several pairs - run with them. If they don't work - take them back. I can't tell you how many new runners get discouraged because they get injured because they aren't wearing the right shoes for them. There are lots of good brands and makes - find one that's right for you. Do not take those old shoes out of the closet and try and start training with them. Good running shoes will cost you anywhere between $70 and $120. Make it your gift to yourself. There's no shortage of running gear on the market, most of it you can do without, but the proper shoes are a necessity.


And if anyone is interested in barefoot or minimalist running, both Kremlin Watcher and I have been doing so for over a year now.

#9 24JoshuaPoint


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Posted 07 December 2010 - 04:25 PM

I'm currently in training to run the Cox in May but since it's my first marathon i'm staying away from fundraising as the last try did not work out. I'm in decision between the BAA and the Hartford half for the Jimmy Fund cause. Both seem pretty cool.




ed - wrong thread

Edited by 24JoshuaPoint, 07 December 2010 - 04:48 PM.


#10 Fo' Rheal

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Posted 07 December 2010 - 04:31 PM

Just signed up for this 5K on 3/13 in Somerville. Couch to 5K, here I come.

#11 Ryo Sen

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Posted 07 December 2010 - 04:32 PM

Just signed up for this 5K on 3/13 in Somerville. Couch to 5K, here I come.


Me, too -- yay, for running followed by green beer.

#12 mrcleanwell

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Posted 08 December 2010 - 07:11 PM

Does anyone run with a partner or is it a solitary event for you? I feel like a partner would keep me from getting discouraged and get me off my ass when I'm feeling lazy. However, I can see it turning into a hassle if one of us were to advance at a faster rate than the other.

If anyone has ever trained with a partner before let me know how it went. I'm on the fence about committing to this and feel that this would really help me get going.

#13 ( . ) ( . ) and (_!_)


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Posted 08 December 2010 - 09:13 PM

Talked it over with my fiance and I am in for this for sure. I've signed up for everything and I am ready to go. I am going to run the Boston's Day to Remember half marathon on May 29th!

It feels good to just write it.



#14 bostonbeerbelly

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Posted 08 December 2010 - 09:41 PM

Hi all and good luck to all new runners willing to take the challenge.


-Start Ramble-
I used to be a pretty decent runner back in high school 6 years ago, I averaged 55 miles a week for 4 years. So I got recruited to a college and I gave it up the first day. In the mean time I have lived a very unhealthy lifestyle. I basically am a walking poster boy for someone who drinks like a fish and smokes like a chimney.

Well I have decided to get healthy, I have given up the bottle and working on the smokes. Today is two weeks sober and thats the longest I have been since I have been 14, so I am pretty happy and feeling pretty good. My running in the past 6 years has been limited to random 5k's here and there to prove myself I could still do it, and a 5:55 minute mile that my friends bet me a $100 I still couldn't break 6 minutes. I ran 3 miles today to get my baseline and I clocked in a little under 25 minutes, I am not sure whether I am happy I did it or disappointed in my time. I am very competitive and I get down on myself cause I have taken so much time off. This disappointment has always stopped me from getting back into the swing of things, and as we all know we can come up with 100 different excuses on why we don't want to go for a run today.

Things are different this time, and it is because I am going to hold myself accountable in this group. My goals are as follows -

1) 5k road race by end of March
2) 10k road race by June 1st
3) Around the Cape - Labor Day weekend i think?
4) Run the BAA Half very competitively

My goal all my life has been to run the Boston Marathon before my grandmother dies. Well I am unemployed working on sobriety and have all the time in the world so I have no reason to not get in great training.

I want to thank Ryan for organizing this and I hope we can raise some serious cash for the Jimmy Fund. I wish everyone the best of luck with their training and look forward to hearing everyones updates and boring others with mine.
- End Ramble -

#15 sass a thon

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Posted 08 December 2010 - 09:48 PM

Talked it over with my fiance and I am in for this for sure. I've signed up for everything and I am ready to go. I am going to run the Boston's Day to Remember half marathon on May 29th!

It feels good to just write it.



Congratulations. You've already done the hardest part.

#16 sass a thon

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Posted 08 December 2010 - 09:51 PM

Hi all and good luck to all new runners willing to take the challenge.


-Start Ramble-
I used to be a pretty decent runner back in high school 6 years ago, I averaged 55 miles a week for 4 years. So I got recruited to a college and I gave it up the first day. In the mean time I have lived a very unhealthy lifestyle. I basically am a walking poster boy for someone who drinks like a fish and smokes like a chimney.

Well I have decided to get healthy, I have given up the bottle and working on the smokes. Today is two weeks sober and thats the longest I have been since I have been 14, so I am pretty happy and feeling pretty good. My running in the past 6 years has been limited to random 5k's here and there to prove myself I could still do it, and a 5:55 minute mile that my friends bet me a $100 I still couldn't break 6 minutes. I ran 3 miles today to get my baseline and I clocked in a little under 25 minutes, I am not sure whether I am happy I did it or disappointed in my time. I am very competitive and I get down on myself cause I have taken so much time off. This disappointment has always stopped me from getting back into the swing of things, and as we all know we can come up with 100 different excuses on why we don't want to go for a run today.

Things are different this time, and it is because I am going to hold myself accountable in this group. My goals are as follows -

1) 5k road race by end of March
2) 10k road race by June 1st
3) Around the Cape - Labor Day weekend i think?
4) Run the BAA Half very competitively


So you're 'unhealthy' and have barely been running yet you put together a sub-25 minute 3 mile run? I'd say that's pretty damn impressive...lots of regular runners would kill for that time. Congratulations and welcome back to the world of running. :) Those are some great goals, by the way. I look forward to watching you attain them.

#17 24JoshuaPoint


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Posted 09 December 2010 - 08:51 AM

For anyone starting fresh I would suggest a heart rate monitor if it hasn't been suggested already. I picked up my first one when i started training and it seemed very helpful. I was smoking quite a bit back then and when i started running I was operating at a pretty high HR level. With just a little training it starts to drop pretty significantly and you begin to figure out your zones and I found it to help maximize training especially if you mix in tempo's and short sprints or hills within your runs.

Everybody's zone is different but from what i've read if you keep your zones constant for each type of training then more is gained. (aerobic vs. anaerobic) I wear it for anything now that requires me to put my sneakers on. Plus i find the data pretty interesting. Not only does your HR go down during training but your resting heart rate will go down as well which is really cool. When you start doing the math it puts into perspective just how much you are changing your body. For example bringing your resting rate down by five points will save you over half a million heart beats per year.

#18 Trautwein's Degree


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Posted 09 December 2010 - 10:51 AM

I want to thank Ryan for organizing this and I hope we can raise some serious cash for the Jimmy Fund. I wish everyone the best of luck with their training and look forward to hearing everyones updates and boring others with mine.
- End Ramble -


I want to thank you. Reading this post is one of the top 5 moments of 2010 for me. Watch out Boston. There's no better time then now.

Edited by Trautwein's Degree, 09 December 2010 - 11:05 AM.


#19 MPG3AJG

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Posted 09 December 2010 - 11:55 AM

Long time Lurker, First time Post-er… What a great idea and obviously a great cause, thanks for setting this up Traut, and for allowing lurkers to get involved. Unfortunately, we’ve all been directly or indirectly affected by this terrible disease and DFCI is SUCH a great cause and help those friends and family afflicted. Anything that can be done to help raise money for research will help.

To echo others on this board, you CAN do this, and this is coming from someone who started running on the wrong side of 30 and about 50 lbs heavier. Don’t try to run the 5K/10K/Half/Marathon tomorrow or next week. Follow the program that best suits you and stick with it (lots of good ones out there, I like www.HalHigdon.com as a resource). The progress you see week over week, month over month is amazing. You might not see it day to day, but you will see improvement and results over time. Just keep at it, “run your own race”, and have FUN!

And absolutely get over to Daily Mile and sign up. It’s a great way to keep track of your mileage and improvement as well as a great motivational tool.

Bring on the 2011 season!!

#20 luckysox


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Posted 09 December 2010 - 01:37 PM


Posted this in the Resolve to do something great....thread on the main board, but that may have been the wrong place so I am re-posting. I swear, sometimes the timing of random things in life sort of make me wonder if anything is random at all.

On Monday, when this whole thing for the Jimmy Fund was posted on the main board, my mom had her first treatment for lymphoma.

In addition to that, I am a mess right now - last week, my partner and I had to bring a little girl that we thought would be our daughter - a two week old - who was placed with us for adoption on 11/19, back to the agency and her birthmother, who decided to parent afterall. This is the 2nd time this happened to us in 5 months - the 1st being in July with an infant boy. Between our own woes with trying to adopt and my mother dealing with lymphoma and now the treatment for it - well, it's been a crap 6 months.

When I have a tough time, I sit on my arse, eat, and watch television. Sometimes I don't even get out of bed to do it (except to get to the fridge), not that I sleep. I just lay there. I know when this happens that the only thing that helps me to start feeling better is to get outside and exercise (inside on the treadmill or bike doesn't work). I was perfectly willing to do the sit on my arse thing for another month or so and just hope we get placed with another baby soon and then I'd miraculously feel better, but now I'm compelled to at least give this running thing a try. I mean, crimony, it's for cancer, and in memory of a very awesome guy. And I have a mom fighting cancer and a dad who already fought and won his cancer battle, and I'm miserable and need to do something to help myself feel whole and worthy again. I feel pretty broken and unworthy right now. I am hoping that committing to this and finding some sort of joy in it will help me start to get better. I have no excuse in terms of time - I quit my job for this baby and now am home all day with 3 dogs, a big bed and the fridge.

Background - I hate running. I have tried, and failed, many times to become a runner. My dad is a runner (finished his 1st marathon in October) and I have tried to tap that gene inside me, but in 36 years I have not been able to do so. I am a former athelete - I was good (when I was young and thin) at almost everything, but NEVER at running. I suck at it, I hate it, and I'm pretty sure it hates me. But I know I can do the committment to training part - I have trained for and completed several multi-day 300+ mile bike rides and even this summer finished a sprint tri-athlon that at least required me to get outside and do a litte bit of work every day, though not to this extent. But even in a damn sprint tri where the run was just 3.1 very flat miles, I managed to only run about 1.5 and walk the rest. It's just that when I run, everything hurts. Knees, hips, ankles, feet, and LUNGS. Even when I'm in shape, my damn lungs hurt!! I have never been able to figure out that nice, smooth breathing that most runners have. Also, I have never experienced the "runner's high." I would like to, unless it is a bunch of bunk, in which case I will be sad, but accepting of the fact that running will alwasy just hurt me and never feel good.

Injury background - I have foot problems. 2 years ago, I had a non-traumatic version of Dustin Pedroia's foot injury and was in a boot for 16 weeks. I've had several stress fractures in both feet over the years, and had one particularly nasty break to my 5th metatarsal on a fall down some stairs in London. I know that stress fractures are easy to come by when ramping up too fast as a runner. I am worried about that. However, I got my foot doc's blessing yesterday. He told me to stick to a resonable training regimen and then said "Good for you, if you lose weight you'll have fewer issues with your feet." I wanted to strangle him through the phone, but it turns out that's impossible (even though he's right, the bastard). He recommended the following book to keep my feet in tact: "Running for Mortals." I bought it yesterday. It looks pretty useful.

So I guess I'm ready. I'll sign up at the Jimmy Fund sight next, download the couch to 5k program to my iphone, and start today (edit: I did all of this - started yesterday). Then I guess I'll look for a 5k around here for March.

Thanks for the inspiration, Traut and others.

PS - that video made me bawl.


#21 Fo' Rheal

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Posted 09 December 2010 - 01:59 PM

Rock on, luckysox!

After work, I am heading out to get some green Superfeet insoles. I guess they work wonders for the high-arched like myself. I have downloaded a bunch of C25K podcasts - just have to get them on the MP3 player and get my ass in gear. Looking forward to it. Thanks to everyone for the inspiration - just need to keep the motivation going.

#22 sass a thon

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Posted 09 December 2010 - 02:11 PM

Rock on, luckysox!

After work, I am heading out to get some green Superfeet insoles. I guess they work wonders for the high-arched like myself. I have downloaded a bunch of C25K podcasts - just have to get them on the MP3 player and get my ass in gear. Looking forward to it. Thanks to everyone for the inspiration - just need to keep the motivation going.


Let me know how those work out. I have insanely high arches and my podiatrist wants me to get $250 custom orthotics but I totally can't afford those. A cheaper option would be nice.

#23 24JoshuaPoint


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Posted 09 December 2010 - 02:23 PM

Damn good luck to you LS; that is really tough times. Running for Mortals was the first book i read as well along with a couple others. Great read.

#24 Trautwein's Degree


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Posted 09 December 2010 - 03:09 PM

If you are just starting out - check out John Bingham's The Courage to Start.

Jeff Galloway is the founding father of the run/walk method. Check out Galloway's website and books On Running and Half Marathon: You Can Do It.

Another big name in running advice is Hal Higdon.Check out his website. His book - Marathon The Ultimate Training Guide is probably the most popular book on marathon training.

Edited by Trautwein's Degree, 09 December 2010 - 03:09 PM.


#25 Trautwein's Degree


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Posted 09 December 2010 - 03:12 PM

Also the Runnersworld Website is filled with great information.

#26 TallerThanPedroia


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Posted 09 December 2010 - 04:19 PM

After you join the Daily Mile SoSH group, let us know who you are here:

http://www.dailymile.../8427-who-s-who

#27 TallerThanPedroia


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Posted 09 December 2010 - 04:41 PM

With all this talk of expensive shoes and orthotics, I hope y'all will indulge me just one post to evangelize for barefoot/minimal running.

I'll bore you with the details of my 13 months experience on request, but this video sells it better than I probably can (apart from the very end, where it becomes a Terra Plann shoe ad, and I can't speak to those).



#28 luckysox


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Posted 09 December 2010 - 07:49 PM

With all this talk of expensive shoes and orthotics, I hope y'all will indulge me just one post to evangelize for barefoot/minimal running.

I'll bore you with the details of my 13 months experience on request, but this video sells it better than I probably can (apart from the very end, where it becomes a Terra Plann shoe ad, and I can't speak to those).



TTP, my dad read a book that came out this time last year - crap I can't remember the name - about the tribe in Mexico(?) that runs barefoot. He loved it and wanted to abandon his shoes forever. My mother talked him out of running barefoot because they live in a snowy area and she's a pain in the butt and she owns him. I think I'll read it, though because my feet are a mess. Something has to give. Maybe its my expensive shoes.

#29 TallerThanPedroia


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Posted 09 December 2010 - 08:00 PM

Born To Run. One of the several things that got me to switch. A great read even if you aren't into barefoot running - just a really damn good story.

I run truly barefoot intermittently (way too cold right now), otherwise I wear these lovely things.

#30 Trautwein's Degree


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Posted 09 December 2010 - 08:28 PM

Keep the stories of why your doing this coming. I love reading them. I'm also interested to learn what races people are running. There are so many great races out there. I love hearing about them.

#31 pedros hairstylist


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Posted 09 December 2010 - 08:50 PM

Marathon Sports (there's one on Boylston St. in Copley Square right near the BAA Marathon finish line and one in Wellesley by Route 9) in the Boston area is a very good (real) running store. I will be buying a HR monitor.

Since I'm going to train on a treadmill during the winter months, is there anything/equipment I need to consider?

#32 sass a thon

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Posted 09 December 2010 - 09:05 PM

Two gear suggestions for newer runners (apologies if Traut already covered this):

1. Avoid cotton and opt for running shorts and shirts made of some kind of wicking material. These can be purchased at running stores, Target, or places like Academy/Dick's. This goes for socks and sports bras, too.

2. Chafing is not fun; invest in a tube of Body Glide. It's the best $7 you'll spend.

#33 Jim Ed Rice in HOF


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Posted 09 December 2010 - 10:18 PM

I just joined the running dogs as well. Started running this summer at the tail end of my fat ass thread journey. I was into sprinting back in high school but hated running more than a mile. Got up to 3-4 miles before a foot injury setback but I've been slogging along on the treadmill at Planet Fitness for the last month or so. I'm going to see what I can do to get myself up to that 1/2 marathon goal.

#34 luckysox


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Posted 09 December 2010 - 10:24 PM

Two gear suggestions for newer runners (apologies if Traut already covered this):

1. Avoid cotton and opt for running shorts and shirts made of some kind of wicking material. These can be purchased at running stores, Target, or places like Academy/Dick's. This goes for socks and sports bras, too.

2. Chafing is not fun; invest in a tube of Body Glide. It's the best $7 you'll spend.


I have a nice tube of Butt Butter from my century cycling days...same stuff (anyone who rides and runs)? It was a Godsend on those rides. I assume its close so I'll give it a try when I get up to more miles (see all that confidence of WHEN, not IF???)

I told my parents today that I was doing this, and to my surprise, they didn't laugh (like I said, I've tried this before and failed). They were pretty proud and my mom said "Hey, maybe you'll help with a cure." I thought that was pretty awesome. My dad said, "But you hate running" and then said he'd run the 1/2 marathon with me - though he's much faster than I'll ever be. But pretty cool.

Day 2 tomorrow. Nice and early, in 25 degrees. I plan to beat the school buses out.

#35 luckysox


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Posted 09 December 2010 - 10:27 PM

I just joined the running dogs as well. Started running this summer at the tail end of my fat ass thread journey. I was into sprinting back in high school but hated running more than a mile. Got up to 3-4 miles before a foot injury setback but I've been slogging along on the treadmill at Planet Fitness for the last month or so. I'm going to see what I can do to get myself up to that 1/2 marathon goal.


Awesome.

#36 pedros hairstylist


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Posted 09 December 2010 - 10:42 PM

Can anyone recommend an inexpensive HR monitor? I dont want something with a million features -- I dont even really want a calorie counter. That's not why I'm doing this and it will be too tempting to focus on that rather than the target HR and fitness.

Dumb Question: where do you put this chafing stuff -- I assume inner thighs, but are there other spots? I've run here and there and dont recall other body parts that chafed but maybe that's because I wasnt doing it far or long enough?

#37 sass a thon

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Posted 09 December 2010 - 11:05 PM

Dumb Question: where do you put this chafing stuff -- I assume inner thighs, but are there other spots? I've run here and there and dont recall other body parts that chafed but maybe that's because I wasnt doing it far or long enough?


Honestly, everyone is different and sometimes the only way to learn is by chafing. I don't use it on my legs, but I can't run without putting it under the straps of my sports bra - specifically the bottom front band. I also put it on the outside of my feet, where I might get blisters, and on the inside parts of my arms that rub against my body. But again, eventually you'll figure out where you need it.

#38 Trautwein's Degree


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Posted 10 December 2010 - 04:50 AM

Can anyone recommend an inexpensive HR monitor? I dont want something with a million features -- I dont even really want a calorie counter. That's not why I'm doing this and it will be too tempting to focus on that rather than the target HR and fitness.

Dumb Question: where do you put this chafing stuff -- I assume inner thighs, but are there other spots? I've run here and there and dont recall other body parts that chafed but maybe that's because I wasnt doing it far or long enough?


I chafe on my upper inner legs and ummm...nether regions. Sometimes on my chest (insert nipple joke) and with some shirts at the seam under my arm pits. I have fairly sensitive skin. I don't run without body glide. The longer the distance the more places I put it on.

Buy moisture wicking stuff. It doesn't have to be expensive either. It just can't be cotton anything. Don't wear cotton. There is no limit to how much high end running apparel can run you. You don't need to buy it. I buy 90% of my clothes at TJ Maxx at race expos or at Target. Target has some great buys with their champion line. I bought a running fleece there for $5 after Thanksgiving.

#39 Trautwein's Degree


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Posted 10 December 2010 - 04:54 AM

I also get stuff at roadrunnersports.com and through amazon. In terms of quality of apparel I really like Brooks and Saucony.

The other thing is to preserve you moisture wicking stuff let it air dry. Your expensive socks will turn hard after a few rounds in the drier.

#40 Trautwein's Degree


  • a Connecticut bicycle attorney in General Motor's Court


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Posted 10 December 2010 - 06:39 AM

If you're going to be using the treadmill set the incline at 1. Doing so will help your form and more closely simulates outdoor running.

#41 sass a thon

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Posted 10 December 2010 - 07:44 AM

I also get stuff at roadrunnersports.com and through amazon. In terms of quality of apparel I really like Brooks and Saucony.

The other thing is to preserve you moisture wicking stuff let it air dry. Your expensive socks will turn hard after a few rounds in the drier.



I also think runningwarehouse.com is a great site. That's pretty much where I buy 100% of my gear these days. My running club gets a 15% discount on that site. Check my link to see if any of these are in your area....the membership fee usually pays for itself in discounts.

Running Warehouse - Club Discounts

Edited by sass a thon, 10 December 2010 - 07:45 AM.


#42 TallerThanPedroia


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Posted 10 December 2010 - 08:54 AM

Boston-area Groupon:

http://www.groupon.c...oston?c=dnb&p=5

#43 boogerpressley

  • 619 posts

Posted 10 December 2010 - 11:06 AM

Alright so I'm in. I joined Daily Mile a few months ago but it fell to the wayside. This time. I won't let that happen.

Just signed up for this http://www.dashdowngreenville.com/

Now, let's get my fat arse in shape aye.

#44 sass a thon

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Posted 10 December 2010 - 11:22 AM

Alright so I'm in. I joined Daily Mile a few months ago but it fell to the wayside. This time. I won't let that happen.

Just signed up for this http://www.dashdowngreenville.com/

Now, let's get my fat arse in shape aye.



www.dallasrunningclub.com

Cost of membership gets you 8 free races a year, so it more than pays for itself. Plus, discounts at Run On, Luke's Locker, and on runningwarehouse.com.

Edited by sass a thon, 10 December 2010 - 11:23 AM.


#45 Jim Ed Rice in HOF


  • Red-headed Skrub child


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Posted 10 December 2010 - 12:13 PM

For those in the NH seacoast area, two March events that end at beer serving establishments.

St. Paddy's Five Miler in Portsmouth on March 13th. Race ends at Paddy's American Bar in the Pease Tradeport.

Pursuit of the Holy Grail in Epping March 19th.

#46 Ryo Sen

  • 438 posts

Posted 10 December 2010 - 05:31 PM

ETA: Ooops, missed that the Groupon was already posted. Instead, ladies, I pass on a recommendation for sports bras for those of us in need of support: Moving Comfort's Fiona sports bra (for high impact): http://www.amazon.co...ref=oss_product If y'all have any other suggestions for good sports bras, I'd be much obliged. :)

There's only a few hours left, but a timely Groupon for those investing in new gear: $25 for $50 worth of "running apparel" at Greater Boston Running Company: http://www.groupon.c...-company-boston

Edited by Ryo Sen, 10 December 2010 - 05:39 PM.


#47 Frisbetarian


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Posted 11 December 2010 - 09:09 AM

If you find a pair of running shoes you really like, go out and buy multiple pairs. The shoe companies change designs constantly and you rarely can find the same pair when you need new ones. If you can find when the change is coming, you can often get great deals on discontinued shoes. Also, running shoe outlet stores, like the Saucony Outlet in Peabody, MA (where I get my stuff), are a great place to get discounted running shoes. There is usually a seconds wall at these places where shoes with "mistakes," like putting the woman's color on the sole of a men's shoe, can sell for real short $. It's hit or miss, but always worth a shot.

#48 Fo' Rheal

  • 88 posts

Posted 11 December 2010 - 12:45 PM

Well, Day 1 of C25K is in the books. I surprised myself! The green Superfeet insoles made a huge difference - I ran relatively pain-free. The pain in my heel got 100 times worse when I was doing my recovery walks. So, I guess I just keep running! Hoping the ice and anti-inflams keep this sucker under control.

Edited by Fo' Rheal, 11 December 2010 - 12:45 PM.


#49 crescd215

  • 329 posts

Posted 13 December 2010 - 05:52 PM

Two Easters ago my dad had a heart attack. This past February my mom had one as well.

Here's to dropping about 25 lbs and returning to pre-college/drinking physique. And fighting off those bad heart genes.

Signed up on both sites. Planning on the DRC Half in Dallas on Nov. 6.

Edit: wrong date

Edited by crescd215, 13 December 2010 - 05:56 PM.


#50 Terras


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Posted 13 December 2010 - 07:24 PM

I started my Semi-C25K yesterday and found that I don't actually know how fast jogging is. I wound up doing more than the prescribed amount of running because every time I'd hit the jogging minute, I'd turn the treadmill up a little faster because I couldn't tell how fast I was supposed to be going and if I was supposed to be breathing heavy by the end of the minute or what. I couldn't tell you how fast I was going because midway through the session I accidentally hit the treadmill screen and it freaked out, but I know that I started walking at a 2 and running at a 5 and ended up walking at a 3 and running at an 8.

Also, as I was running, I noticed in my reflection that as I was finishing my stride, my back foot is kind of flailing out a little bit. When I tried correcting it by keeping my feet straight, I found myself running more on the outside of my feet. I know that certain people run certain ways in respect to which part of their foot they use the most, (I think I run on the inside) but is it normal for me to have to change my form just to keep my feet straight?