Jump to content


Yo! You're not logged in. Why am I seeing this ad?

Photo

Feds intercept Jose Guillen's HGH package


This topic has been archived. This means that you cannot reply to this topic.
10 replies to this topic

#1 mabrowndog


  • Ask me about total zone...or paint


  • 37273 posts

Posted 14 November 2010 - 02:52 PM

Ruh roh...

Jose Guillen put himself and his wife in a world of legal hurt when the Giants' outfielder allegedly arranged for a shipment of nearly 50 pre-loaded syringes of human growth hormone to be sent to his San Francisco address in September, while his team was clawing its way to a playoff berth.

According to a source close to a federal investigation of Guillen, Drug Enforcement Administration agents, who were monitoring the activities of the suspected supplier, intercepted the package when it was sent to the Giants' outfielder to the attention of Yamel Guillen - Jose Guillen's wife, who also goes by Yamel Acevedo.

Federal agents contacted Major League Baseball's Department of Investigation about the shipment and the DOI, according to sources, continues to investigate the matter and whether anyone else in baseball might have been involved, especially since Guillen has a history of acquiring HGH and steroids: Prior to the release of the Mitchell Report on performance-enhancing drug use in baseball, Guillen was set to be suspended 15 games to start the 2008 season after he reportedly purchased HGH, testosterone and other steroids through the Palm Beach Rejuvenation Center in multiple transactions between 2002-2005. One of those shipments, which included HGH, testosterone proprionate, stanozolol and syringes, was sent to the Oakland Coliseum. The commissioner's office slapped Guillen with a 15-day suspension days before the release of the Mitchell Report, and the outfielder was to have served that ban at the start of the 2008 season when he was with the Royals. But in April of 2008, Bud Selig announced that Guillen and other players mentioned in the report would receive amnesty for "past acts" and Guillen did not serve the suspension. (One of the recommendations in the Mitchell Report was that packages sent to players at major-league ballparks should be logged, with the sender's address and phone number, the recipient's name and the date of delivery recorded.)

Under baseball's drug policy, a second offense against Guillen would possibly lead to discipline, and according to sources, baseball is actively pursuing information about the shipment or shipments. After the DEA tracked the September package, believed to have been sent from Miami through the San Francisco Airport, agents then arranged a controlled delivery to the home of Guillen, where Yamel Guillen signed for the package. Once she penned her signature, DEA agents identified themselves and Yamel Guillen consented to a search. She is believed to have left the country in recent weeks, returning to the Dominican Republic.

Jay Reisinger, Jose Guillen's attorney, declined to comment on the case.


But wait... There's more!!

The DEA may also be looking at a second incident in which HGH was also shipped to a San Francisco apartment or hotel address registered under Jose Guillen's name, according to sources, who say the shipments are linked to suppliers in the Dominican Republic. Steroids and HGH are legal in the D.R. and easily obtainable without a prescription, which has been a persistent problem for MLB's anti-doping efforts. When Alex Rodriguez admitted his past steroid use, he claimed that a cousin would go to the D.R. and secure the steroid Primobolan and then bring it to A-Rod in the U.S. when the star player was with the Rangers.

MLB has focused on cleaning up drug issues among prospects in the D.R., first hiring Sandy Alderson to overview its efforts and this past week replacing Alderson with Jorge Pérez-Diaz, a partner with the Puerto Rican law firm Pietrantoni Mendez & Alvarez LLP, after Alderson was named the Mets' new general manager last month. One of the issues Pérez-Diaz will tackle is the legality of steroids in the country.



You just know Selig and his lackies will pounce on this in their continuing quest to deflect blame, and what better scapegoat than a repeat offender? Of course, anyone named in the Mitchell report who's stupid enough to continue using this stuff deserves what they get.

#2 SeanBerry


  • poopdragon


  • 3226 posts

Posted 14 November 2010 - 05:28 PM

I am pretty convinced we'll never see Jose Guillen in a major league uniform again so any suspension Selig wants to give won't really matter.

#3 PBDWake

  • 2623 posts

Posted 14 November 2010 - 06:58 PM

Yes, but it would let media advance the narrative that teams no longer want to touch Roidies with a 10 foot pole, and that's WHY he isn't gonna be touched.

#4 SoxSport

  • 7 posts

Posted 02 December 2010 - 09:34 AM

Isn't HGH one of those steroids they don't have a test for? As long as there are undetectable steroids out there, they'll be used. The money is too good not to.

#5 absintheofmalaise


  • too many flowers


  • 10773 posts

Posted 02 December 2010 - 09:46 AM

Isn't HGH one of those steroids they don't have a test for? As long as there are undetectable steroids out there, they'll be used. The money is too good not to.

HGH is not a steroid. There is a test that has been developed to detect HGH.

Google is your friend here. Please take the time to educate yourself before you post and when you do post, please try to add something that moves the discussion forward. Thanks.

#6 techsoldaten

  • 191 posts

Posted 05 January 2011 - 01:36 PM

HGH is not a steroid. There is a test that has been developed to detect HGH.

Google is your friend here. Please take the time to educate yourself before you post and when you do post, please try to add something that moves the discussion forward. Thanks.

Yeah, they call it a test, but it's more like a pop quiz:

http://articles.lati...-tests-20100304

"Even more troubling is the fact that, despite testers' optimism over last week's news that a single positive blood sample snared a British rugby player for HGH, there are questions about why hundreds of other athletes are suspected of having skirted detection in the same procedure."

While I can't claim to be familiar with all the science behind it, HGH tests tend to be centered around detecting abnormal testosterone levels in the human body. There are numerous ways to surpress testosterone levels temporarily - there is research stating that just watching Oprah can dramatically reduce it in males.

So, I don't think much of this thing they call a test. I also don't think HGH has the same impact as anabolic steroids, and HGH probably has about as much impact on the game as amphetamines. It's going to get someone to bounce back faster, and that's not a terrible thing that affects record books.

#7 SumnerH


  • Malt Liquor Picker


  • 14339 posts

Posted 05 January 2011 - 02:03 PM

While I can't claim to be familiar with all the science behind it, HGH tests tend to be centered around detecting abnormal testosterone levels in the human body.



No, they don't. There are 2 primary types of HGH testing.

Isoform ratio assays (formerly known as "direct testing") measure the ratios of the various isoforms of GH in the body. Naturally occurring HGH is about 75% of a specific isoform ("22-kDa") and 25% of non-22-kDa isoforms. Exogenous HGH as used in doping is entirely of the 22-kDa isoform. So if the 22-kDa ratio is particularly high, doping is assumed. The problem with isoform assays is that the isoforms have a very short half life; within 36 hours of stopping use, the ratios return to natural levels. So you pretty much have to catch someone immediately after using.

gh-dependent marker measurement looks for proteins that are generated in the presence of growth hormone and measures their levels. Usually IGF-1 (insulin-like growth factor 1) is the key protein measured, though generally you measure several to control for other possible reasons for IGF-1 spikes. If these proteins are present in abnormally high levels, it's a sign that exogenous HGH has been used.

#8 techsoldaten

  • 191 posts

Posted 05 January 2011 - 11:32 PM

No, they don't. There are 2 primary types of HGH testing.

Isoform ratio assays (formerly known as "direct testing") measure the ratios of the various isoforms of GH in the body. Naturally occurring HGH is about 75% of a specific isoform ("22-kDa") and 25% of non-22-kDa isoforms. Exogenous HGH as used in doping is entirely of the 22-kDa isoform. So if the 22-kDa ratio is particularly high, doping is assumed. The problem with isoform assays is that the isoforms have a very short half life; within 36 hours of stopping use, the ratios return to natural levels. So you pretty much have to catch someone immediately after using.

gh-dependent marker measurement looks for proteins that are generated in the presence of growth hormone and measures their levels. Usually IGF-1 (insulin-like growth factor 1) is the key protein measured, though generally you measure several to control for other possible reasons for IGF-1 spikes. If these proteins are present in abnormally high levels, it's a sign that exogenous HGH has been used.

I consider myself schooled. Thank you. For whatever reason, I failed to differentiate between GH and testosterone.

Are you aware of any criticisms of the marker method in general? I know that these systems are applied widely outside North American sports leagues, but often read about concerns that the tests are ineffective esp. with regard to rugby.

#9 SumnerH


  • Malt Liquor Picker


  • 14339 posts

Posted 06 January 2011 - 12:11 AM

I consider myself schooled. Thank you. For whatever reason, I failed to differentiate between GH and testosterone.

Are you aware of any criticisms of the marker method in general? I know that these systems are applied widely outside North American sports leagues, but often read about concerns that the tests are ineffective esp. with regard to rugby.


They all suck. The marker methods are improving, but none of them are particularly great at catching people. The belief is that within 5 years there'll be a more effective test, but at the moment it's really only a minor threat--if you happened to take HGH within the last 1-2 days when we come around, we might get you.

That's better than the "no problems, have fun, there's no test!" atmosphere that existed 5 years ago, but it's not much.

And they're all blood-test methods, which MLB doesn't use; the urine tests are theoretically able to occasionally catch someone under the right circumstances, but (I think, I could have missed something) have never actually done so in practice and have ridiculously small windows from what I understand. They're also likely to improve, but more slowly than the blood tests (ie don't hold your breath).

Edited by SumnerH, 06 January 2011 - 12:12 AM.


#10 Kull


  • wannabe merloni


  • 1141 posts

Posted 15 February 2011 - 12:31 AM

And they're all blood-test methods, which MLB doesn't use; the urine tests are theoretically able to occasionally catch someone under the right circumstances, but (I think, I could have missed something) have never actually done so in practice and have ridiculously small windows from what I understand. They're also likely to improve, but more slowly than the blood tests (ie don't hold your breath).


In other words, testing is purely a public relations gimmick - at least as it pertains to HGH. The only way they are going to catch someone is events like this one. I can understand why a successful young ML player wouldn't take the risk, but if you are young and marginal or old and hanging on, there's almost no downside. Other than the health risks (which are debateable and possibly even non-existent, unlike sterioids), there's almost no reason not to use it.

#11 maufman


  • SoSH Member


  • 11978 posts

Posted 16 February 2011 - 09:14 AM

Is there any evidence that HGH is an effective PED, except when used in conjunction with anabolic steroids?

There is some thought that HGH accelerates the growth of connective tissues, et al., required to support the rapid increase in muscle mass stimulated by steroid abuse. Obviously, this is conjecture-- there is no ethical way to test this hypothesis. The ridiculous success enjoyed by Barry Bonds in the early '00s might provide some anecdotal support for this hypothesis if he in fact used HGH in conjunction with his steroid regimen (as Game of Shadows stated he did).

HGH helps people with deficient hormone production produce normal muscle mass. Iirc, use of HGH by normal people isn't shown to enhance muscle development, but it's risky to extrapolate studies of typical people to professional athletes, who are by definition outliers. The players in the Mitchell Report who used HGH but (as far as we know) not steroids were generally players trying to recover more quickly from injury, with Andy Pettitte being the most high-profile example. This is consistent with the general belief that HGH probably doesn't have a steroid-like effect on the growth of muscle mass.

The anti-aging properties of HGH are a controversial topic in medical circles. It's pure speculation whether HGH's anti-aging properties (assuming they exist) would slow the effects of age on an elite athlete in his 30s. I expect this is the appeal of HGH to someone like Jose Guillen. And yes, I agree with what's been said above-- Guillen probably was looking at a ST invite before this, which he now won't get, and the owners will hold this up as evidence that "juicers" are no longer welcome in the game. Yawn.

Edited by maufman, 16 February 2011 - 09:16 AM.