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Digesting Beckett's Dominance


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#1 mabrowndog


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Posted 03 October 2007 - 08:19 PM

I thought as early as the 4th inning that this was the best Beckett's looked all season. Not just because of his consistent veolcity, but because his breaking stuff had serious movement and he didn't leave ANYTHING up in the zone. As for the numbers:

* His third postseason shutout at the age of 27.

* Retired 19 straight hitters after the leadoff single to Figgins.

* Five batters put the ball in play on the first pitch. Five more did so on the second pitch.

* Of the remaining 21 hitters, Josh got ahead 0-2 on 9 of them.

* Threw first-pitch balls to just 6 hitters. Only one, Maicer Izturis in the 2nd, had a 2-0 count.

* Threw only 7 pitches in the 9th inning.

* Figgins (1st) and Izturis (5th) where the only batters to see 3 balls in a plate appearance.

* In all, he threw 83 strikes and only 25 balls.

Just outstanding.

Edited by mabrowndog, 03 October 2007 - 09:33 PM.


#2 JohntheBaptist


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Posted 03 October 2007 - 08:22 PM

I really felt the key to his entire outing was the two seamer, which he threw consistently in a perfect spot, in the right situations, and it was filthy tonight. It was really diving/ tailing.

Of course, that assumes that the rest of his pitches didn't look great all night too- they did. The curve was real sharp and the 4-seamer had some real hair on it.

But the 2-seamer was indicative of his willingness to try something other than simply blowing hitters away. It was really never even a contest. That's the best he's looked as a Red Sox, no matter what the circumstance.

edit- am I crazy, or did he more or less avoid the changeup tonight?

Edited by JohntheBaptist, 03 October 2007 - 08:23 PM.


#3 Fratboy


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Posted 03 October 2007 - 08:24 PM

THIS is the stud we traded for in 2005. Guy's got some serious huevos. We saw it in 2003. He got cocky in 2006 when he was just throwing the ball around, but 2007 is the year we're going to remember that he became a Pitcher, and a worthy successor to Pedro Martinez's legacy. Some of those pitches were so filthy they should have their mouths washed out with soap.

Simply a dominant, almost historical, postseason performance. I hope we can be treated to a few more in the next several weeks.

#4 Noah

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Posted 03 October 2007 - 08:26 PM

edit- am I crazy, or did he more or less avoid the changeup tonight?


I only noticed a couple, including one on a first pitch to Guerrero. Didn't really need it though, since the turnover two-seamer was awesome.

Beckett has had many days this year when he dominates by getting a lot of strikeouts on the curveball, but not today. Great job turning over the fastball, keeping it low, and getting swings and misses that way.

#5 bornintoit

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Posted 03 October 2007 - 08:26 PM

I loved the shit eating grin he had on his face after about the 4th... I think he knew he was in control..

The Angels didn't have a chance tonight.. simply amazing performance..

#6 tims4wins


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Posted 03 October 2007 - 08:27 PM

For reference, that was Beckett's 3rd career postseason shutout. Only Christy Matthewson, with 4, has more. The only other guys with 3 are Whitey Ford and Mordecai Brown.

I think this list speaks for itself.

#7 syoo8

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Posted 03 October 2007 - 08:29 PM

mabrowndog,

Glad you started this thread.

What happened tonight? Was it the extra rest that Beckett got? Or was it the big stage?

#8 dcmissle


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Posted 03 October 2007 - 08:29 PM

THIS is the stud we traded for in 2005. Guy's got some serious huevos. We saw it in 2003. He got cocky in 2006 when he was just throwing the ball around, but 2007 is the year we're going to remember that he became a Pitcher, and a worthy successor to Pedro Martinez's legacy. Some of those pitches were so filthy they should have their mouths washed out with soap.

Simply a dominant, almost historical, postseason performance. I hope we can be treated to a few more in the next several weeks.



Agreed. If memory serves, this is the most dominant post-season start for the Red Sox in at least a generation and perhaps longer. A complete game, four-hit shutout, with no walks and precious few 3-ball counts. I recall nothing like it in the playoffs. Not by Pedro. Not by Roger. Maybe my memory fails me here, but is what we saw tonight a first?

#9 Ananti


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Posted 03 October 2007 - 08:31 PM

Last CG shutout by a Red Sox pitcher in the post season was Game 1 1975 WS by Luis Tiant.

#10 wade boggs chicken dinner


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Posted 03 October 2007 - 08:32 PM

If I had one game to win, I don't think there's another pitcher in baseball I'd rather have starting. And to think, we have him signed for 3/$30M. Theo deserves mucho kudos for that one.

#11 jsinger121


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Posted 03 October 2007 - 08:33 PM

This is why you acquire pitchers like this for him to dominate in the playoffs. He saved his best start of the season for the right time.

#12 MidnightC

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Posted 03 October 2007 - 08:35 PM

More of his pitches were up in the first and second inning, but by the third, everything was around the knees, except when he didn't want it to be. He had exceptional fastball command tonight and a really, really good hook. I counted just two hanging curveballs, but the Angels didn't (or couldn't) do anything with them.

Most impressive was just that he got ahead of everyone. How many full counts did he get to--two? Three maybe? Even against a hacking club like the Angels, that's very difficult to do. Just strike after strike after strike.

I'm completely awed by that performance. I wish all our postseason games could go so smoothly and be that much fun to watch.

#13 amarshal2

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Posted 03 October 2007 - 08:35 PM

I really felt the key to his entire outing was the two seamer, which he threw consistently in a perfect spot, in the right situations, and it was filthy tonight. It was really diving/ tailing.

Of course, that assumes that the rest of his pitches didn't look great all night too- they did. The curve was real sharp and the 4-seamer had some real hair on it.

But the 2-seamer was indicative of his willingness to try something other than simply blowing hitters away. It was really never even a contest. That's the best he's looked as a Red Sox, no matter what the circumstance.

edit- am I crazy, or did he more or less avoid the changeup tonight?


I saw lots of change-ups...or at least that's what they looked like and the scoreboard agreed. He didn't use it as much later in the game when the curve was really working.

#14 dcmissle


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Posted 03 October 2007 - 08:36 PM

Last CG shutout by a Red Sox pitcher in the post season was Game 1 1975 WS by Luis Tiant.



Thank you very much. If pushed, I might have guessed Hurst.

Now that you mention this, I have a dim recollection of the Tiant effort, and it was dazzling, with pitches coming from every angle with changing speeds. Artistic. Tonight was overwhelming. Only Vladdy and Chone had a clue at the plate.

#15 satyadaimoku


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Posted 03 October 2007 - 08:38 PM

Agreed. If memory serves, this is the most dominant post-season start for the Red Sox in at least a generation and perhaps longer. A complete game, four-hit shutout, with no walks and precious few 3-ball counts. I recall nothing like it in the playoffs. Not by Pedro. Not by Roger. Maybe my memory fails me here, but is what we saw tonight a first?

Jim Lonborg's complete game one hit shutout in Game 2 of the 1967 World Series is probably better, although Lonborg only struck out four.

#16 Ananti


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Posted 03 October 2007 - 08:41 PM

If I had one game to win, I don't think there's another pitcher in baseball I'd rather have starting. And to think, we have him signed for 3/$30M. Theo deserves mucho kudos for that one.


In the post season, against lineups with good hitters and advanced scouting up the whazoo, you need guys who can dominate inside the strike zone. The control artists like Glavine or Maddux never does as well as the guys with the pure stuff like Beckett or Schilling.

#17 OilCanShotTupac


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Posted 03 October 2007 - 08:42 PM

Rarely, if ever, will you see a pitcher throw a curve with that much break AND that much control. He was making it do exactly what he wanted.

#18 86spike


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Posted 03 October 2007 - 08:43 PM

that heater he threw to Morales to end the 8th inning was one of the filthiest pitches I've ever seen Beckett throw. It started at Morales' elbow and then dove back in to catch the inside corner as if it was a 96 mph wiffle ball. Unreal.

I hope Daisuke and Curt are up for some competition and step up their games accordingly.

#19 TFisNEXT


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Posted 03 October 2007 - 08:44 PM

The greatest thing about Beckett's performance was that he was in complete control the entire time. You never once thought he might be losing it.

He worked his pitches perfectly. He probably could've had 10 or 12 Ks but at the expense of his complete game. He was happy to have them roll over his two seamer for groundouts.

#20 GreyisGone

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Posted 03 October 2007 - 08:47 PM

I saw lots of change-ups...or at least that's what they looked like and the scoreboard agreed. He didn't use it as much later in the game when the curve was really working.

Ya he threw at least 10 change ups. His first 2 pitches to Aybar were both change ups. He threw a real nice first pitch one to Vlad late in the game, threw a nice one to Anderson. He and Varitek did a good job working it in as the game went along.

#21 bankshot1


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Posted 03 October 2007 - 08:49 PM

Beckett was so damn fluid out there, he made pitching look easy. That was just a beautifully pitched game.

#22 singaporesoxfan

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Posted 03 October 2007 - 08:49 PM

* Five batters put the ball in play on the first pitch. Five more did so on the second pitch.

* Of the remaining 21 hitters, Josh got ahead 0-2 on 9 of them.


I love this combination. Angels are pretty free-swinging, but still - the choice for them tonight was between putting the ball in play for an out or waiting to be struck out.

#23 Papelbon's Poutine


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Posted 03 October 2007 - 08:50 PM

that heater he threw to Morales to end the 8th inning was one of the filthiest pitches I've ever seen Beckett throw. It started at Morales' elbow and then dove back in to catch the inside corner as if it was a 96 mph wiffle ball. Unreal.


That pitch immediately made me think of Lowe's pitch in Oakland to finish it out. Just filthy. I don't think I've ever seen Beckett throw a pitch with that particular movement on it.

#24 Worst Trade Evah


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Posted 03 October 2007 - 08:51 PM

I like pictures, so here's the Fangraph for the game

Posted Image

What's cool here is how flat it is. And look at the pLI at the bottom -- there are practially no hi-leverage moments in the whole game.

That's dominance.

Compare it to the Rockie game the other day, which was a complete see-saw.

A picture of the game like this is kind of fun.

#25 dcmissle


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Posted 03 October 2007 - 08:52 PM

If I had one game to win, I don't think there's another pitcher in baseball I'd rather have starting. And to think, we have him signed for 3/$30M. Theo deserves mucho kudos for that one.



Yes Theo does, and if this proves out, the Sox would be wise to approach him about an extension with 2 years left. Beckett is rare -- think of how many great pitchers have never been able to match their success in the playoffs. He's a cold blooded assassin who lives in and up to the moment, never letting it get the better of him. Tonight reminded me of what Dave Stewart routinely did when matched against Clemens in the late 80s, even better.

Edited by dcmissle, 03 October 2007 - 08:54 PM.


#26 mabrowndog


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Posted 03 October 2007 - 08:54 PM

During his press conference Josh said he specifically didn't want to get into a strikeout war with that lineup because "those are the at-bats that will drive up your pitch count."

Instead, he pitched to contact, which he said makes sense "when you've got a defense like we've got."

Translation: This was just as much a night of mental mastery for Josh Beckett as it was a night of physical dominance and control.

#27 Mourning Woodward Jr

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Posted 03 October 2007 - 09:06 PM

Tonight reminded me of what Dave Stewart routinely did when matched against Clemens in the late 80s, even better.


Definitely better. With Stewart, you always had this "why aren't they hitting this guy?" feeling -- at least I always felt that way. He rose to the occasion, but left you with some hope most of the way through.

There was no hope for the Halos tonight. None. Fusing that power with that control; that velocity with that mind game, and this one -- even for the most anxiety-ridden Sox fan -- was never in doubt.

#28 Kitchkinet

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Posted 03 October 2007 - 09:09 PM

This is the Josh Beckett I know from personal experience.

I was in the stands for 2003 NLCS Game 5, his first postseason CGSO. It's amazing, because he easily could have been shaken up. He gave up 4 ER in the first inning of Game 1, but the Fish rallied from behind to get him off the hook and even win the night. And then the Fish lost three in a row. He could have easily given up. But he bucked up, and proceeded to go nine innings, carrying the team with 11 K's, while only scattering 2 hits and issuing one walk.

What I saw that night was the emergence of greatness. He had a total of 2 ER and tossed 19 K over 14 1/3 IP in his two losses that postseason, NLDS Game 1 and WS Game 3. He finished the postseason 2-2 with a 2.11 ERA, with 21 hits and 47 K/12 BB over 42 2/3 IP (0.77 WHIP) in 5 starts and a relief appearance (4 IP in LCS Game 7).

Josh Beckett is a big-game pitcher. Give him the ball, and he will keep you in the game. This year, I'm confident that he will remind the world of that.

Edited by Kitchkinet, 03 October 2007 - 09:09 PM.


#29 LoweSox


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Posted 03 October 2007 - 09:17 PM

If memory serves, this is the most dominant post-season start for the Red Sox in at least a generation and perhaps longer. A complete game, four-hit shutout, with no walks and precious few 3-ball counts. I recall nothing like it in the playoffs. Not by Pedro. Not by Roger.

-dcmissle

Here, here.

Other notes:

"I don't quite get it. And while we're here, how could anyone pick Josh Beckett for the the Cy Young Award over Sabathia when Sabathia threw 41 more innings and had similar stats? What am I missing? I mean, I'm the biggest homer on the planet and even I don't think Beckett deserves it over Sabathia. Why is this even a debate?" -Bill Simmons.

Josh Beckett:
Career postseason shutouts: 3
Career postseason innings pitched: 51.2
Career postseason hits allowed: 25
Career postseason runs allowed: 10

(Edit: added substance.)

Edited by LoweSox, 03 October 2007 - 09:20 PM.


#30 fletcherpost


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Posted 03 October 2007 - 09:19 PM

Beckett threw 108 pitches and 83 for strikes. 8 K's and 0 Walks.

When Vlad gets base hits in the 7th and 9th innings respectively (both times with no runners on) Beckett arrests any potential momentum by closing out the inning with relative ease, pitching to contact.

He looked as focused as I have seen him all season. He actually looked rather serene on the mound. I hate to say it but he made it look easy. He pitched like a true Ace and he sets the standard.

#31 Soxfan in Fla


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Posted 03 October 2007 - 09:23 PM

The beauty of his great performance is that our bully is even more rested. No Paps, no Okajima, no MDC. I think that is huge for a pen that had at least one tired arm and one arm that is always a close watch (Paps) that are main cogs.

#32 TheRooster

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Posted 03 October 2007 - 09:23 PM

Agreed. If memory serves, this is the most dominant post-season start for the Red Sox in at least a generation and perhaps longer. A complete game, four-hit shutout, with no walks and precious few 3-ball counts. I recall nothing like it in the playoffs. Not by Pedro. Not by Roger. Maybe my memory fails me here, but is what we saw tonight a first?


I know you wrote "start" but Pedro's 6 inning no-no against Cleveland should at least get a respectful nod here.

#33 SoxFanSince57


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Posted 03 October 2007 - 09:29 PM

During his press conference Josh said he specifically didn't want to get into a strikeout war with that lineup because "those are the at-bats that will drive up your pitch count."

Instead, he pitched to contact, which he said makes sense "when you've got a defense like we've got."

Translation: This was just as much a night of mental mastery for Josh Beckett as it was a night of physical dominance and control.


Yes, this does illustrate his maturation as a "pitcher". Great to see.

His location was just unbelievable tonight--83 strikes and 25 balls.

I was 'yapping' to myself when Josh came out in the 9th, but when I saw his look of complete satisfaction, happiness and pride in his accomplishment I realized, once again, that Tito is smarter than me by miles. IMO, this was a landmark win for Beckett. Letting Josh 'go for the win' was the right move.

Beating the ERA king of the AL was quite something.

#34 The Gray Eagle


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Posted 03 October 2007 - 09:34 PM

"That pitch immediately made me think of Lowe's pitch in Oakland to finish it out. Just filthy. I don't think I've ever seen Beckett throw a pitch with that particular movement on it."

I had the same flashback to D-Lowe when he threw that pitch. The late movement made it unhittable. He could've yelled "here comes a fastball on the inside corner" and it still would've been untouchable.

This is a start that will be remembered for its pure dominance for a long time, no matter what else happens from here on.

#35 Soxfan in Fla


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Posted 03 October 2007 - 09:35 PM

Yes, this does illustrate his maturation as a "pitcher". Great to see.

His location was just unbelievable tonight--83 strikes and 25 balls.

I was 'yapping' to myself when Josh came out in the 9th, but when I saw his look of complete satisfaction, happiness and pride in his accomplishment I realized, once again, that Tito is smarter than me by miles. IMO, this was a landmark win for Beckett. Letting Josh 'go for the win' was the right move.

Beating the ERA king of the AL was quite something.


He had only thrown 101 pitches and was on a roll. No reason not to bring him out. Tito also had the pen ready behind him if necessary. Right move all the way by Tito.

#36 tims4wins


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Posted 03 October 2007 - 09:36 PM

Beckett pitched to more batters (31) than pitches he threw for balls (25). I can't imagine that's been done very often in postseason play, if it's ever been done.

A stunning display of both command and power tonight.

Edited by tims4wins, 03 October 2007 - 09:36 PM.


#37 LynnRoyalRooter

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Posted 03 October 2007 - 09:40 PM

Just to chime in on this I think that a couple of points are well taken.
1)The control within the zone allowing you to get outs on pitchers pitches early in the count was amazing.
2)I don't know who was calling the pitches/setting up the game plan, but they were on point with every pitch. They would throw off speed when guys were swinging and paint the corner when they were taken.

To be honest, the Angels were trying to work the count a little bit, it's just that it was 0-2 every time that they did. There's no team that hits that Josh Beckett, not the Angels, not the Yankees, not the 2003 Red Sox.

Sometimes guys like Beckett who throw very hard with some movement can get away with missing their location just because they throw so hard so often times opponents will just foul it off...tonight he wasn't ever even missing his spots.

Anyway - Fantastic performace...Let's take it from here.

#38 staz


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Posted 03 October 2007 - 09:41 PM

In 140 minutes, Beckett singlehandedly:
- Put his team in the driver's seat of this series
- Gave his team as much momentum as can be had after one game
- Got his banged up teammates on and off the field swiftly
- Ensured a fully rested pen for game 2
- And I wouldn't be surprised to see a couple of those flailing LAA hitters go into a tailspin for a game or two.

Tonight's performance may have coattails.

#39 OttoC


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Posted 03 October 2007 - 09:52 PM

Agreed. If memory serves, this is the most dominant post-season start for the Red Sox in at least a generation and perhaps longer. A complete game, four-hit shutout, with no walks and precious few 3-ball counts. I recall nothing like it in the playoffs. Not by Pedro. Not by Roger. Maybe my memory fails me here, but is what we saw tonight a first?

By Game Score, Bill Dinneen has the best performance for a Red Sox pitcher, with a 3-hit shutout over the Pirates at home on October 2, 1903, walking 2 and striking out 11 for a score of 90. Lonborg's 1-hitter was second at 88 and Beckett's third at 87. (Note: I only did complete games).

#40 mabrowndog


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Posted 03 October 2007 - 09:57 PM

QUOTE(dcmissle @ Oct 3 2007, 06:29 PM) *
Agreed. If memory serves, this is the most dominant post-season start for the Red Sox in at least a generation and perhaps longer. A complete game, four-hit shutout, with no walks and precious few 3-ball counts. I recall nothing like it in the playoffs. Not by Pedro. Not by Roger. Maybe my memory fails me here, but is what we saw tonight a first?

(TheRooster @ Oct 3 2007, 10:23 PM)
I know you wrote "start" but Pedro's 6 inning no-no against Cleveland should at least get a respectful nod here.

I watched Luis Tiant shut down the vaunted Big Red Machine in game 1 of the '75 World Series -- a complete game 5-hitter with 3 Ks and 2 BBs. Luis beat the Reds more with guile and finesse than with his fastball.

And while not a complete game, Clemens' performance in Game 6 in '86 (before it all fell apart...) is worthy of note: 7 IP, 4 H, 1 ER, 8 Ks and 2 BBs.

I think we often discount the starting pitching in the 2004 WS for some reason. Perhaps because of the LCS hangover, or perhaps because after Game 2 the Cardinals just seemed like a resigned and beaten team. Regardless, two performances stand out: Pedro and Lowe each threw 7 innings of 3-hit ball in games 3 and 4. Pedro whiffed 6 while walking 2, while Lowe racked 4 Ks and a walk.

Still, none of these match what Beckett did tonight.

By Game Score, Bill Dinneen has the best performance for a Red Sox pitcher, with a 3-hit shutout over the Pirates at home on October 2, 1903, walking 2 and striking out 11 for a score of 90. Lonborg's 1-hitter was second at 88 and Beckett's third at 87. (Note: I only did complete games).

FWIW, Tiant's game score was a 78.

Edited by mabrowndog, 03 October 2007 - 10:01 PM.


#41 singaporesoxfan

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Posted 03 October 2007 - 10:02 PM

From the AP report, a good sense of just how much a throwback Beckett's CG shutout is:

Christy Mathewson is the only pitcher with four postseason shutouts; Beckett tied Whitey Ford and Mordecai Brown with three.

Link

With all the additional postseason games every year, it's pretty amazing that the other people with that many postseason shutouts still precede the division-play era (although obviously the demise of the CG is well documented). And it's a great list for Beckett to join. Although admittedly I can't imagine Beckett getting as great a nickname as "Three Finger".

#42 LahoudOrBillyC


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Posted 03 October 2007 - 10:03 PM

By Game Score, Bill Dinneen has the best performance for a Red Sox pitcher, with a 3-hit shutout over the Pirates at home on October 2, 1903, walking 2 and striking out 11 for a score of 90. Lonborg's 1-hitter was second at 88 and Beckett's third at 87. (Note: I only did complete games).

If one compares 2007 to 1903 and 1967, however, a different picture would starkly emerge.

#43 dcmissle


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Posted 03 October 2007 - 10:04 PM

Per ESPN, bigger picture:

Christy Mathewson is the only pitcher with four postseason shutouts; Beckett tied Whitey Ford and Mordecai Brown with three. Nice company.

#44 Foulkey Reese


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Posted 03 October 2007 - 10:10 PM

As soon as the game was over I remarked to my friend that this might have been the first Sox game of the season where I didn't have at least some anxiety. But for this game there was none...it just breezed right by because of Beckett.

To say that Beckett was in complete control would be the understatement of the season. Just utter and complete dominance in every way possible tonight. I agree with JohntheBaptist that his 2 seamer was key tonight, and it was as sharp as I've ever seen him throw it.

This is definitely the guy the Sox traded for, and it's very very exciting to realize that we have him locked up for a while. What a deadly post season weapon.

#45 Tudor Fever

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Posted 03 October 2007 - 10:13 PM

By Game Score, Bill Dinneen has the best performance for a Red Sox pitcher, with a 3-hit shutout over the Pirates at home on October 2, 1903, walking 2 and striking out 11 for a score of 90. Lonborg's 1-hitter was second at 88 and Beckett's third at 87. (Note: I only did complete games).

Babe Ruth had a Game Score of 97 in Game 2 of the 1916 World Series. He threw 14 innings, giving up 1 run.

Edited by Tudor Fever, 03 October 2007 - 10:14 PM.


#46 MidnightC

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Posted 03 October 2007 - 10:18 PM

From the AP report, a good sense of just how much a throwback Beckett's CG shutout is: Link

With all the additional postseason games every year, it's pretty amazing that the other people with that many postseason shutouts still precede the division-play era (although obviously the demise of the CG is well documented). And it's a great list for Beckett to join. Although admittedly I can't imagine Beckett getting as great a nickname as "Three Finger".


It's incredible considering this is only Beckett's second trip to the postseason ever. I mean, how does a guy throw three complete game shutouts in only six career postseason starts?

#47 tims4wins


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Posted 03 October 2007 - 10:23 PM

As soon as the game was over I remarked to my friend that this might have been the first Sox game of the season where I didn't have at least some anxiety. But for this game there was none...it just breezed right by because of Beckett.

I feel the exact same way, Foulkey. It was probably the least stressful Sox playoff game I've ever experienced, and that includes blowouts over Cleveland 1998 & 1999, the Pedro/Roger game in 1999, and game 1 in Anaheim in 2004. Once Papi homered to give them the 3 run cushion, and it was evident that Beckett was dealing, I was basically able to sit back and not freak out about anything. A great, great feeling, and perhaps part of the reason why the crowd seemed a little dead.

Not coincidentally, it was also the shortest Sox playoff game that I can ever remember.

#48 CaptainLaddie


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Posted 03 October 2007 - 10:25 PM

The AP had a nickname for him - too bad it's already in use. "Mr. Zero".

Edit - That was amazing. He was just on his game all night. I couldn't believe how easily he got through a pretty damn good Angels lineup 3+ times. I wonder if he hadn't let Figgins on to start the game, how things would have been different.

Edited by CaptainLaddie, 03 October 2007 - 10:26 PM.


#49 86spike


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Posted 03 October 2007 - 10:26 PM

I remember feeling that same ease during Game 7 of the 2004 ALCS in the Bronx after the Damon and Bellhorn dingers... but then Theo let Pedro pitch that vanity outing and he sucked and the 'who's your daddy' cants started and I got really fucking tense.

tonight turned out easier... although far less fun, of course.

#50 mabrowndog


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Posted 03 October 2007 - 10:27 PM

Per ESPN, bigger picture:

Christy Mathewson is the only pitcher with four postseason shutouts; Beckett tied Whitey Ford and Mordecai Brown with three. Nice company.

You are the 4th person to post this same information, including SSF just two posts before you.

Is anyone actually reading this thread???