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It is the best of times. It is the worst of times.


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#1 Sille Skrub

  • 3,966 posts

Posted 28 August 2007 - 11:37 AM

Rick Pitino was right. The negativity in this town stinks and it sucks.

I'm really down on being a Boston sports fan right now. For all the friggin whining we heard this year, and this team might win 100 games. The Red Sox have had the best record in baseball for most of the season. Quite honestly, it has been one of my least enjoyable seasons and might be the best Red Sox team I will ever see in my lifetime. Here's the problem:

I really don't think people knew how to react to leading the AL East race rather than chasing.

It definitely made people crazy this season and you would think 2004 would have changed that.

Last Monday a jerkstore in my office said to me, "How much do you want to bet that the Sox go 18-20 the rest of the way and miss the playoffs?"

I said, "I'll take that bet, anything you want."

He goes, "Your Pats season tickets."

I said, "Fine, no problem. What are you putting up?"

He then shut up.

Yesterday I said to him, "Good thing you didn't take that bet, eh? The Sox have gone 6-1 since you said that."

He admitted he had jumped the gun and was reactionary. Unfortunately, too many Red Sox fans are like this. To them, I jokenly call the 2007 Red Sox the "worst, best team in baseball" in baseball history and they agree. The same people that cursed the team just a few days ago are now strutting around talking about playoff rotations. Give me an f'n break. Try sitting in KC or Cincinnati for a 162-game season. Some of you wouldn't make it.

In response to this post some might say, "But Skrub, people had every reason to worry as the lead went from 15 games to 4 within six weeks! The thought of 1978 had to creep into your head! We're Red Sox fans for goodness sake, we have to worry! The sky usually falls on us more than any other fan base on Earth!"

I totally disagree with this statement. Furthermore, I was 5 in 1978. My brother texted me this week and told me I was right about not worrying. I told him all summer that the Sox would be fine and that the Yankees would miss the playoffs. If you looked at our August/September schedule, and considered our pitching, you would have seen that there was nothing to worry about. Our offense isn't as good has it has been, but it is still good enough. We all know that pitching wins in October anyway.

With advances in technology, the thought of patience and calm have gone out the window. We need instant gratification all the time and move so fast that we sometimes miss the forest for the trees. We want everything. We want it all and we want it yesterday. This couldn't be more evident than in the mind of a typical Boston sports fan.

Furthermore with the recent success of the Patriots, Boston has taken on a football mentality when it comes to sports. We're still very much a baseball town, but it seems like we are looking through a 197lb. football helmet at this point. Baseball is very different from football as it is a 162-game season. It is cliched and has been repeated ad nauseum, but apparently still not enough: Baseball is a marathon, not a sprint. Even the very best teams lose about 60 times. For comparison's sake, 60 losses is like 1000 years of losses for Belichick and Brady. (fanboy emoticon)

We're very fortunate to be Boston sports fans right now. I don't think people see that around here. I can't even listen to WEEI, read the paper, read SoSH or even talk to the majority Red Sox/Pats fans here in the Commonwealth after a Sox or Pats loss. You can imagine how tough this is for a sports fanatic like myself and like many of you are. Hell, I can't even read a game thread when the Sox are losing (Yeah it's a game thread, I know. They aren't for me). It's absolutely horrible, and downright embarassing.

So, I'll echo my dear friend Fris with my simple yet humble request for Boston sports fans everywhere:

Remain calm, all is well.

Keep the faith.

If the Sox happen to lose 16-0 tonight, it isn't the end of the world. All they really need to do this week is win one against New York. It would be great if they win tonight because that would really put the pressure on the Yankees. A win tonight might even lead to a sweep. I think they will take 2 of 3 in the Bronx this series.

The 2007 Boston Red Sox
The 2007 New England Patriots
The 2007-2008 Boston Celtics

This is the golden age, folks. Try to enjoy the ride over the next 10 months. It is definitely going to be fun.

Skrub out.

#2 Guest_Corsi Combover_*

Posted 28 August 2007 - 11:41 AM

I thought it was the blurst of times?

#3 Drocca


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Posted 28 August 2007 - 11:51 AM

Part of the problem, in my eyes, is that so many people take discussing and analyzing the team to mean we're not enjoying it. I'm enjoying this season. Part of what makes me enjoy baseball is discussing it and part of discussing any team is discussing faults. It's a baseball message board. I don't live in New England anymore so I don't know how the fans are right now up there and I don't listen to WEEI but as far as SoSH goes there's room for plenty of voices.

#4 mbarrett

  • 143 posts

Posted 28 August 2007 - 11:56 AM

One of the reasons people might not be overly excited about the 07 Red Sox is because they have not been an overly exciting team. They haven't had a long winning streak (or a long losing streak, for that matter). They haven't had a lot of exciting ninth inning comebacks.

Unlike the 03 and 04 seasons, there hasn't been a slogan or nickname associated with the team (fine by me).

There's no mercurial star like Pedro, or a quote machine like Millar.

Ortiz is having a very good season, but it's not spectacular like last year's was.

We have JD Drew, who makes most people sour just at the mention of his name.

These Red Sox just aren't as memorable as more recent versions, and so for some people, that translates into not a great team. Even if they've had the best record in the majors almost all season.

I'd think that this weekend's annihilation of the woeful White Sox would finally shape people up. Hard for me to say, since I live 3,000 miles from Boston--a fact that often makes it much easier to be a Red Sox fan.

#5 Gene Conleys Plane Ticket

  • 3,189 posts

Posted 28 August 2007 - 12:01 PM

Rick Pitino was right. The negativity in this town stinks and it sucks.

I'm really down on being a Boston sports fan right now. For all the friggin whining we heard this year, and this team might win 100 games. We've had the best record in baseball for most of the season. Quite honestly, it has been one of my least enjoyable seasons and might be the best Red Sox team I will ever see in my lifetime. Here's the problem:

I really don't think people knew how to react to leading the AL East race rather than chasing.


...

With the advances in technology, the thought of patience and calm have gone out the window. We need instant gratification all the time and move so fast that we sometimes miss the forest for the trees. We want everything. We want it now and we want it yesterday. This couldn't be more evident than in the mind of a typical Boston sports fan.

Furthermore, with the success of the Patriots, Boston has taken on a football mentality when it comes to sports. We're still very much a baseball town, but it seems like we are looking through a 197lb. football helmet at this point. Baseball is very different from football as it is a 162 game season. It cliched and has been repeated ad nauseum, but apparently still not enough: Baseball is a marathon, not a sprint. Even the very best teams lose about 60 times. For comparison's sake, 60 losses is like 1000 years of losses for Belichick and Brady. (fanboy emoticon)

We're very fortunate to be Boston sports fans right now. I think people don't see that around here. I can't even listen to WEEI, read the paper, read SoSH or even talk to the majority Red Sox/Pats fans here in the Commonwealth after a Sox or Pats loss. You can imagine how tough this is for a sports fanatic like myself and like many of you are. Hell, I can't even read a game thread when the Sox are losing (Yeah it's a game thread, I know. They aren't for me). It's absolutely horrible, and downright embarassing.

So, I'll echo my dear friend Fris with my simple yet humble request for Boston sports fans everywhere:

Remain calm, all is well.

Keep the faith.

If the Sox happen to lose 16-0 tonight, it isn't the end of the world. All they really need to do this week is win one against New York. It would be great if they win tonight because that would really put the pressure on the Yankees. A win tonight might even lead to a sweep. I think they will take 2/3 in the Bronx this series.

The 2007 Boston Red Sox
The 2007 New England Patriots
The 2007-2008 Boston Celtics

This is the golden age, folks. Try to enjoy the ride over the next 10 months. It is definitely going to be fun.

Skrub out.


I gotta say, I've been thinking pretty, much the same thoughts for most of this season. I mean, I'm not saying not to be critical of the Red Sox' flaws. But the fact is, this team has led the division virtually wire to wire this season. Yet from the media, the fandom and even from this board, if I were just an objective observer, I'd think that this was the worst thing that ever happened. Honestly, this race has never really been close. I've been a Red Sox "die hard" since I was old enough to understand when my dad read me the standings in the paper. I've lived through it all, from Luis Aparicio to Grady Little. But even after all that, I still scratch my head over the reactions to what has been one of the three or four best regular seasons of my lifetime.

#6 Ananti


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Posted 28 August 2007 - 12:01 PM

Sports fandom is not about been rational. It's about being fanatics, being irrational, being emotional, being impulsive, being bi-polar. It's an outlet for all the wackiness that has to go somewhere.

And that's a good thing. If it doesn't get channeled in something innocuous like baseball or football, the wackiness get channeled in much worse ways in other parts of the world (like blowing oneself up).

So I say, get happy, get depressed, jump for joy, wallow in self pity. Whatever works for you as a fan!

#7 mt8thsw9th


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Posted 28 August 2007 - 12:06 PM

I was talking to my dad at some point last week, he usually uses me as a barometer. I just told him to "give it time". The irony of being a part of this message board (with tens of thousands of posts at other boards over the past 6+ years) is I really hate when people over-analyze, game to game, and overreact to things week to week. The bottom line was then, and is now, is that the Red Sox are in first, and hope for the best from here on out.

#8 Tizzolator

  • 498 posts

Posted 28 August 2007 - 12:10 PM

I know that this is a simple answer to a complex question, but I honestly blame WEEI for this phenomenon - post 2004. Despite what happened in 2004, their shtick never changed.

#9 ToeKneeArmAss


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Posted 28 August 2007 - 12:13 PM

Good post, Skrub. But for my money, DCHONG said it more succinctly and eloquently here.

#10 Flask N Gaggin'

  • 428 posts

Posted 28 August 2007 - 12:28 PM

Good post, Skrub. But for my money, DCHONG said it more succinctly and eloquently here.


It's down to the residue of the loser mentality that surrounded the Sox pre-2004. Some people refuse to look at the facts and see that Sox are a well run, talented team. They have a great chance at winning it all, however certainly there are no guarantees. Many people just sit around waiting for the other shoe to drop. Any time over the last few months you would start talking about the division being over people would respond with "I survived '78, etc...." This certainly isn't a WEEI phenomenon, as the majority of the hosts have had the division being wrapped up for quite awhile now. And lets not forget the obsession with the Yankees that drives people to constantly measure the Sox against them.

If Pats fans were like Sox fans, we'd be talking about how we are nervous about Maroney's shoulder, and waiting for Moss to go on a killing spree.

I also think the amount of coverage (TV, radio, newspapers, messageboards, blogs, etc) out there now can lead to overanalysis that can make people forget the big picture.

#11 gcapalbo

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Posted 28 August 2007 - 12:33 PM

I think you're absolutely right Skrub.

Perhaps we like to think of ourselves as 'better' than the average fan around here, and less prone to fits of panic and negative thinking, but obviously it has happened here, perhaps to a lesser amount than in the general fan base, but nonetheless there has been some panic.

Lately, I've been dealing with this kind of thing with my 80yr. old dad. He has lived through it all from Pesky holding the ball, through 2004 and up until the present day. In '04, the night after game 3 of the ALCS he lectured me about how "You don't get it... it will always be the same..." (implying... you fool). Obviously he was very happy a few days later.

This year, right about the time the Yankees pulled to within 4 games, I tried to explain the whole 'strength of schedule' thing to him and he just rolled his eyes... and reminded my of it after the Yankees-Cleveland series.

I really think that people like my dad, who have been through the 'lean' years have been psychologically damaged to some extent and it hurts. (I was in college in '78... ouch!).

It's a lot of history to live through.

My theory about the turnaround in the fortunes of both the Red Sox and the Patriots is pretty simple, and obvious:

Change of ownership.

Say what you will about the Yawkeys, both good and bad, there was something not quite right in their management of the club, and those same mistakes were repeated year after year, especially IMHO when Tom and Jean became old and the team was largely managed as a 'trust'.

Watching the team these past few years, '06 and '07 especially has been like watching a computer run a mathematical model. The results are predictable, and repeatable.

Certainly last year, you wanted the ball to get hit sharply into the infield because you knew something amazing would happen.

This year you want to see the bullpen come into a game in the late innings, because they're going to largely shut down the opposition.

Obviously these are generalities, and some players have worked out better than others. The '06 season fell apart because of injuries, the hitting this year has not been (until recently) as hot as we'd all like... but nothing is ever perfect.

That being said, this team has played at a fairly consistent level throughout the season because it is well constructed, and well coached. Theo and company have more talent in the pipeline (Lester, Buchholz, Ellsbury, etc.) so that this team is likely to be competitive for years to come.

So yes, enjoy these years.

For the short term, 2/3 in the Bronx, a sweep if we can get to PettiTTe.

#12 JohntheBaptist


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Posted 28 August 2007 - 12:43 PM

This is my motto...hence, I am about to be banned and everyone is happier for it.

I think you're about to be banned because you willingly took a bet and are about to lose it.

I think, at the end of the day, the long, continual stretch of summer baseball just perpetually lends itself to streaks and resulting [over] reaction. Because there's no down time to get what's going good/ bad "corrected" outside of the field, its constantly happening and perpetuating itself- unlike in, say, football. Well, relatively.

Edited by JohntheBaptist, 28 August 2007 - 12:44 PM.


#13 jacklamabe65


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Posted 28 August 2007 - 12:43 PM

Scrub - I feel fortunate that I was baptized as a Red Sox fan by teams that regularly lost a hundred games in a ballpark that usually had less than ten thousand a game. I did not know what success was until my sixth year of following the team.

Accordingly, our recent successes makes all of this so sweet because I well remember when the team was truly marginalized. Ditto for the Pats - in spades. Present-day C’s and B's fans know what I am talking about.

#14 OneRedSock


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Posted 28 August 2007 - 12:46 PM

Part of the perception here has to come from the fact that SOSH prides itself on not being part of the fans of a lessor stature than I brigade of happy-go-lucky fans. We pride ourselves on looking deeper until we find the flaws, instead of just swilling our overpriced lagers and doing the wave. If you asked an average fans of a lessor stature than I fan how the team was doing they'd say it was fantastic and then suggest that they Yankees could go perform some anatomical improbabilities. Lots and lots of Sox fans are very happy right now.

The flipside is that SOSH doesn't feel the downs as badly -- we bleed Red Sox red, just like everyone else, but we also start looking at the farm system or trades or anything else that will distract us from previously annual August swoon.

#15 yecul


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Posted 28 August 2007 - 12:46 PM

I dunno, I have a different viewpoint on this.

The people who care about every form of non-positive commentary are the ones with the deepest ingrained "loser mentality" (using gcapalbo's term) of all.

People have different tendencies when faced with adversity. Mr. Jerkstore takes the route of setting expectations low to guard himself against the potential for failure. Until Boston wins the Series this should be expected. Conversely, others take the route of completely ignoring the possibility of failure. Unable to deal with failure? Not wanting to? Afraid? While this has the potential to setup for a big disappointment, I'd imagine that there's a certain level of emotional detachment that guards against it.

To be honest though, I don't see it, but maybe that's because I'm not living in Boston. Sure there are different levels of concern of various things, but the majority of the board and all playoff projectors have all been favorable. There will always be idiots out there, but I really have to question their level of involvement with the team. They're the equivalent of Yankee fans that "just watch the playoffs". But, who gives a shit about them? When you start to worry about what the jerkstore is selling then it's time to move on.

#16 Fratboy


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Posted 28 August 2007 - 12:47 PM

<slow clap>

I agree with your sentiments almost entirely, Skrub. Recognize that I come from a slightly different perspective, that of someone raised a Cubs fan, but adopted the Sox as my hometown/laundry team as an adult. As a kid, I never had any designs on the Cubs winning the World Series, not with the Mets and Cards hanging around. .500 was enough for me. In that respect, Red Sox fans have really been spoiled for a long, long time, not having suffered the indignity of a 90-loss season since 1966, longer than any other major league franchise.

That said, I want to address what I perceive to be the central question in your argument:

“Why has this season been lacking joy?”

There are several reasons for this:

1) This is a Red Sox team different from any one we’ve ever seen. In a word: balance. We’ve been fed (and thoroughly digested) the lie that Fenway is an extreme hitter’s park, one of the best in baseball, and that the only way a team could succeed would be with offense and league average pitching. It’s been shown for a while that with the new ballpark’s built that Fenway is neutral with slight-to-moderate biases to the hitter. League-leading offense with mediocre/mediocre-plus pitching was the formula for the 2003-2005 teams, and filled the ballpark with a sense of excitement and foreboding for opponents. Papi and Manny hit home runs at will! Trot, Millar, and Mueller are doubles machines! We’ll bludgeon our opponents to death!

This ain’t that team no longer, boys.

What did we learn from the 2004 and 2005 World Series? Pitching, pitching, pitching. Derek Lowe had the best two weeks of his life. Petey held his own. Schilling had his own medical heroics. Foulke sacrificed his career for a World Championship. Timlin, Embree, and Leskanic were nails when they needed to be. So too for the White Sox in 2005. The pitching and lack of depth was the main weakness with the 2006 staff. Theo recognized that they were somewhat limited with the number of runs they were going to score in 2007, so they set their eyes on acquiring pitching and anticipating improvement from the parts they already had in place.

This team is very similar to the 1998-2002 vintage of the Red Sox, with a couple of differences:

First, whereas in 1998-2002 the offense was concentrated in Nomar, Everett, and Manny, the wealth has been spread around. They’re league average-plus at all positions but one, and earlier they had a bunch of replacement level talent manning key positions. (Darren Lewis, anyone?)

Second, the pitching staff was Pedro and everyone else, but Pedro was so strong that he single handedly made them the best pitching staff in the league.

This is the studs and scrubs approach that made Dan Duquette so vilified in these parts. He never complemented the core with the talent needed to take them to the next level.

This 2007 club has a much better offense than those earlier teams because of the balance from top to bottom. That combined with arguably the best pitching staff in all of baseball, and this team will be in every game and not suffer any long losing streaks.

Offense and spectacular walkoff homeruns are sexy. Pitching and defense isn’t. The Red Sox win not by hitting their opponents over the head and making blood spurt like a fountain, but by cutting them off at their knees so they wallow helplessly in a pool of blood.

2) Ghosts and Pressure. 1974. 1977. 1978. 2005. All these teams held leads late in the season and blew them. We fear the future because we know the past, despite the 1986 team hanging on to win the division handily, but that was an aberration, don’tcha know? They could have blown it in 1988 and 1990 as well, but didn’t. Not that it matters, really. This perception has been wrought by the media looking to connect this team to those of the past that failed, but doesn’t account for the unique circumstances for each situation.

“We know they will fail. This is their destiny. This is the Red Sox. This is what they do. 2004 was smoke and mirrors – just 2.5 months of luck.”

Well yeah, winning a championship does take luck. Luck is the residue of good design. 1997 Marlins. 2001 Diamondbacks. 2003 Marlins. 2005 White Sox. 2006 Cardinals. None of those clubs were what I would call “good”. But they made plays and won when they needed to and reaped the rewards. Why can’t the Sox do the same?

The 14.5 game lead over the Yankees on Memorial Day may have been eerily reminiscent of their lead in 1978, but was more vulnerable because it was in May, not July. What happened in 1978 was the exception, not the rule, and nothing that proved a particular rule. There is no connection.

When you get out to a big lead early, you feel the pressure not to necessarily succeed, but to not fail. For most of the .500-ish stretch, my prevailing thought upon a Sox victory wasn’t “Thank God they won!” but rather “Thank God they didn’t lose!” This is a little different than the mindset of the 2003/2004 fan, hopeful and optimistic that the quality of the team wasn’t reflected in the won/loss record, but that they could win their way into the postseason tourney.

Ladies and Gentlemen, the Boston Red Sox are your 2007 American League East champions. Revel in it. Drink deeply. Savor it. Enjoy it. No matter what happens this postseason.

And root your guts out for the Indians, Tigers, and Mariners.

#17 BS_SoxFan

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Posted 28 August 2007 - 12:56 PM

I know that this is a simple answer to a complex question, but I honestly blame WEEI for this phenomenon - post 2004. Despite what happened in 2004, their shtick never changed.


I agree wholeheartedly. I was just stunned on Sunday following the game when I was out driving around to hear a guy call WEEI saying he wanted to discuss the absolute ass kicking the Red Sox gave the White Sox over the weekend. I expected a glowing phone call, doing little more than praising every great moment of the weekend, and instead, this jerk actually had the nerve to question Terry Francona's decision to rest Manny Sunday, saying it could have cost the Sox a game they won 11-1! He went into the old "they win in spite of Francona..." rant and brought up 1978 before John Rische, one of the bright spots of WEEI just stopped the guy, hung up, and moved on. Its that group of people, who, sadly, make up a large portion of the fandom, that continue promoting this miserable Red Sox fans stereotype, and hopefully a consistently good, albeit unexciting (as opposed to 03 and 04) season will help to quell some of those stereotypes. This has been a tremendous season that I have been very happy to be a part of, the Sox are going to win the AL East.

Edited by BS_SoxFan, 28 August 2007 - 12:57 PM.


#18 Razor Shines

  • 3,486 posts

Posted 28 August 2007 - 01:00 PM

I know that this is a simple answer to a complex question, but I honestly blame WEEI for this phenomenon - post 2004. Despite what happened in 2004, their shtick never changed.

WEEI's schtick didn't create the negative fans, it's the other way around. WEEI is the way they are because they know their audience. Cynical Sox fans have been around much longer than WEEI.

Although I'm optimistic, I have come to accept that some Sox fans have become very jaded by the events of the past 30 years, and I guess they might have good reason for that. What happened in 1978, 1986, and 2003 (and a few more minor failures in between) really isn't paralleled by any American sports franchise.

#19 Lose Remerswaal


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Posted 28 August 2007 - 01:00 PM

Skrub's got Bingo.

I've been pretty darn cool, calm, and collected all season. 14 game lead on the Yankees? Terrific, but there's half a season to go. Injuries happen, trades happen, anything can happen.

4 game lead on the Yankees? Yeah, it's not 14, but we've got a much easier schedule ahead of us than they do the rest of the way.

8 game lead with 31 to go? Just take 1 of these 3 and you've taken another week off of the schedule where they can barely see out dust. And we've got 13 straight against Tampa, Toronto, and Baltimore between this series and the Yankees coming to Fenway.

If the Sox take 1 of 3 from the Yankees this week, and only go 8-5 against Tampa, TB, and Baltimore, the Yanks will have to go 11 and 1 vs. TB, Toronto, KC and Seattle over the next two weeks to come here still down 4 games.

Y'all should enjoy being in first place. The view is great from here, if you dare to enjoy it.

#20 DJnVa


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Posted 28 August 2007 - 01:02 PM

I think we need to coin a term for those who, no matter what, are waiting for the collapse. We have "fanboys" and "fans of a lessor stature than I" but the other extreme is just as wacked out.

People throw the term "fanboy" around so much I don't think they know what it means anymore. Honestly, you're not being a "fanboy" if you didn't expect Lugo to hit .197 the entire year. There were reasons to expect a turnaround. People are conditioned so much not to drink the kool-aid that they try too hard sometimes to go the other way.

Folks, 130 games are a large enough sample-size. The Sox are good. They've consistently had the biggest lead in the game all summer long. They've had the best record in the game most of the summer. They can put the nail in the coffin regarding the Yankees and the AL East in AUGUST. Every once in a while it's good to remember that.

EDIT: Seriously, that's awesome. Take care of business the next 3 days and SiaS $200 million machine will spend an entire month chasing the Seattle Mariners. Yeah, that's what Roger Clemens signed up for.

Edited by DJnVa, 28 August 2007 - 01:05 PM.


#21 RedOctober3829


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Posted 28 August 2007 - 01:06 PM

This era of Boston sports has the chance to rival any time in any cities' history. Just imagine what could happen this year.

1)World Series parade in November
2)Super Bowl parade in February
3) NBA Championship celebration in June.

No city in America could realistically think of this proposition. New York? No way LA? No football team Chicago? Please. I have never been happier to be a Boston sports fan. Just reference my sig.

Edited by RedOctober3829, 28 August 2007 - 02:06 PM.


#22 SaveBooFerriss


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Posted 28 August 2007 - 01:09 PM

I think we need to coin a term for those who, no matter what, are waiting for the collapse.


Before 2004, the term was "Red Sox fans." I agree that since 2004 there should be a new term.

#23 Shelterdog


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Posted 28 August 2007 - 01:15 PM

I think we need to coin a term for those who, no matter what, are waiting for the collapse. We have "fanboys" and "fans of a lessor stature than I" but the other extreme is just as wacked out.


SoSHers? Honestly, there are tons of posters on this board - and in particular the game threads - who are relentlessly negative.

Just wait and see, if the sox lose two or three games against the MFYs, the board will be going nuts.

#24 William Robertson

  • 3,469 posts

Posted 28 August 2007 - 01:19 PM

I agree with Skrub about 99%. These are good times, and I'm enjoying them, and I like this team.

For the 1%:

First, I'm not there, and I didn't make it to Fenway this year, but it seems that a lot of people are not participating in the negativity you pointed out. The fan base is huge, and a very small percentage of malcontents can make a lot of noise. I see a lot of people having fun, including the Sox fans I hang out with behind the dugout when the Drive come to Hickory, NC. And I think at least one thing happened that says the fans are more positive this year, and that's the Lugo experience. Again, I wasn't there, but it seemed that his bad times did not draw nearly the load of fan opprobrium that has been showered on players in the past in similar situations, and weren't there a few occasions when the fans at the park offered him support when he was at the worst point?.

Second, my psychology buddies tell me pain is one of the most effective reinforcers of memory, and people who lived through '78 (I attended at least half the home games, and all the games during the crazy period) can't be blamed too much for having some anxiety that things can go wrong. I didn't like the constant "sky is falling" mess any more than you did, but I also think there were some young fans who didn't have a very complete understanding of the fact that a four game lead in mid-August is fairly fragile. This wouldn't be as much fun if it wasn't a little bit scary.

#25 Fratboy


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Posted 28 August 2007 - 01:21 PM

Just wait and see, if the sox lose two or three games against the MFYs, the board will be going nuts.

I completely disagree. I think everybody knows the Yankees are COOKED w/r to the division title. People will go nuts if the Sox are swept, I'll give you that, because that'll happen regardless of the opponent.

My larger point is that nobody will care if the Red Sox win exactly one game.

Care to make it interesting?

#26 Razor Shines

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Posted 28 August 2007 - 01:21 PM

SoSHers? Honestly, there are tons of posters on this board - and in particular the game threads - who are relentlessly negative.

Just wait and see, if the sox lose two or three games against the MFYs, the board will be going nuts.

I generally find SoSH to be one of the most optimistic subclasses of Sox fan.

Yeah, you'll see some negativity here if your scenario happens, simply because there isn't really any positive spin to getting swept by the Yankees.

#27 Smiling Joe Hesketh


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Posted 28 August 2007 - 01:26 PM

I'll address a couple of things that I think may be reasons for the attitude Skrub describes:

- The very nature of this year's pennant race. I think it's a fairly unique feeling to leap out early to a big lead and then see it slowly get whittled away as the season goes along. I don't think anyone expected that now-legendary 14.5 game lead over NY to stand up all season, but I do think it's fair to note that it's an unsettling feeling being the chased for once instead of the chasers. To see NY get red hot and slice the lead down to 4 games was not a lot of fun. I enjoyed it more in 2004 cutting NY's lead from 10 games to 2, even though this year the club is technically in a better position.

- The team's unusual consistency has perhaps made them appear less strong than they really are. Whereas in 2004 you had a 20-2 run late in the year, giving a hint that the team was special, this club has yet to have a winning streak over 5 games in 2007. They also do not have as many 9th inning comebacks this year as they've had in the past. While in the long run it really makes no difference in the quality of the team, in the short run it gives the appearance of maddening inconsistency. Add to that the mediocre months they've had recently (13-14 in June, 15-12 in July), plus the team's rather obvious flaws (disappointing seasons from Lugo and Drew, lack of HR power from Ortiz and Manny, Youkilis' terrible second half, leaving tons of runners on base) and it is a team where it's easier to point out the flaws rather than the strengths. As Frat pointed out, winning with pitching can be effective, but it ain't sexy.

- While the mantra of "best team in baseball" gets bandied about plenty, this year it strikes me as being less than a useful descriptor because there doesn't seem to be as many dominant teams this year as there were in past years. Nearly all of the divisional races are pretty close, and this year it certainly feels that any team that gets into the playoffs could win the whole thing. If it's a crapshoot, then it's tough to take a lot of solace in having the best record in baseball.

Look, if folks are going to be miserable there's not a lot anyone can do about it. Take their money like Skrub, or ignore them, or mock them if necessary. But let's not veer the other way and turn this into the Happy Sunshine Fun Forum. Discussion about the team is not necessarily negative.

#28 esfr

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Posted 28 August 2007 - 01:26 PM

Reading this makes me feels its more fun to be Sox fan in NYC than it is in Boston...easy to tune them out if you need to but fun as hell when you want to tune them in.

I've actually enjoyed the season more than many in recent memory because the individual stories form a nice back drop to the team success...especially since my man Coco remembered how to hit and Lugout came back from the brink. Oki, Lowell, Pedroia, Dice-K, Beckett are all stories you can get excited about...I'm not a big Wake fan but happy to see him succeed and after the Renteria experiment I'm convinced every player gets a year so Drew doesn't kill me either. Manny and ORtiz have been below career years but not disastrously or maddeningly so.

Interestingly, among my immediate cohort of fellow fans 3 of us are in NYC, 1 in LA and 1 in Boston. The guy in LA has been uncharacteristically the optimist. The guy in Boston was upbeat but had to take a leave of absence last week when the lead shrunk to 4 games and the the other 2 guys in NYC have felt its the worst best team in baseball. So there you have among the 5 of us all the various feelings I've seen expressed here...

To me its clear that some of the negativity stems from the squander factor that has persisted all year (until last Thursday anyway), which makes the losses more frustrating - that's just human nature to react that way...

Personally, I've been frustrated with Tito's (and the teams) lack of urgency at times and that marvelous 7 game run in 2004 didn't do anything to convince me that Tito was a master button pusher as much as a guy who just tried to keep things loose and let things happen.

Finally, what i want to see now that i can be greedy with a WS victory in hand is for the Red Sox to dispense with a there high anxiety tradition and break from the historical script with a convincing series victory this week.

#29 smastroyin


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Posted 28 August 2007 - 01:32 PM

Honestly I do think that part of the problem is that people don't necessarily recognize the parity of the league right now. We went through so many years with multiple 100 game winners that people set that as their expectation for a "great" team. Also, as a couple of others have pointed out, they are winning more with pitching which tends to be the more boring way to win. After 2003-2005 we got spoiled, and last year everything sucked, so I think people associate losing with a somewhat tepid offense. And, frankly, in casual terms it is easy for us who pay a lot of attention to know that Pedroia is such a huge improvement over Loretta and Lowell and Varitek are performing so much better than last year that it makes up for, in some ways, the lack of power from Ortiz and Manny and the lost season of JD Drew.

On the pitching side, a lot of their strength is from depth and not from heights. This is unusual for the Sox fans of this generation who are used to having an ace that is a legitimate contender for the Cy Young award every year but not having much depth. A kind of similar year was 1993 pitching wise where Clemens was injured and largely ineffective so people tend to forget how great that team was at pitching. I think casual fans might look at say, Schilling's year and think the pitching staff isn't that good because they don't have that kind of ace at the front of the staff.

#30 cutman1000

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Posted 28 August 2007 - 01:34 PM

I think it's easy to start this thread after the Sox just extended their lead in the division from 4 games to 8 games in about a week. But the simple truth is a 14 game lead turned into a 4 game lead with still plenty of games to be played. I don't think I could ever be called a negative fan, but I was nervous.

I've never lived in Boston and only listened to WEEI on MLB audio, so I haven't been affected by any negative mentality. The Sox just didn't play good baseball for an extended period of time, and many fans were worried.

Edited by cutman1000, 28 August 2007 - 01:36 PM.


#31 DJnVa


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Posted 28 August 2007 - 01:36 PM

Look, if folks are going to be miserable there's not a lot anyone can do about it. Take their money like Skrub, or ignore them, or mock them if necessary. But let's not veer the other way and turn this into the Happy Sunshine Fun Forum. Discussion about the team is not necessarily negative.


Sure, but being positive about this team's chances doesn't immediately invalidate one's opinion as not well thought-out.

You're still mad Teixeira ain't here, admit it.

Edited by DJnVa, 28 August 2007 - 01:37 PM.


#32 Shelterdog


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Posted 28 August 2007 - 01:40 PM

I completely disagree. I think everybody knows the Yankees are COOKED w/r to the division title. People will go nuts if the Sox are swept, I'll give you that, because that'll happen regardless of the opponent.

My larger point is that nobody will care if the Red Sox win exactly one game.

Care to make it interesting?


If you could figure out how to structure the bet I'd love to make a small bet with the Jimmy Fund or whoever taking the money.

My prediction would be that if the Sox win only one game, then I'm sure you'll see main board posts stating:

1) posts about the Sox's record being a mirage and the Sox not really being the best team in baseball;

2) posts about the Sox not having the killer instinct because they didn't take care of business and end the MFY season when they had a chance, and that this bodes well because the Sox aren't a true, special championship team;

3) posts about the division now being back in play; and

4) posts about how the Sox have to pray the MFYs don't make the playoffs because they have our number.

There will also be the normal amount of game thread garbage, but that's too be expected.

#33 esfr

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Posted 28 August 2007 - 01:42 PM

Honestly I do think that part of the problem is that people don't necessarily recognize the parity of the league right now. We went through so many years with multiple 100 game winners that people set that as their expectation for a "great" team. Also, as a couple of others have pointed out, they are winning more with pitching which tends to be the more boring way to win. After 2003-2005 we got spoiled, and last year everything sucked, so I think people associate losing with a somewhat tepid offense. And, frankly, in casual terms it is easy for us who pay a lot of attention to know that Pedroia is such a huge improvement over Loretta and Lowell and Varitek are performing so much better than last year that it makes up for, in some ways, the lack of power from Ortiz and Manny and the lost season of JD Drew.



I totally agree with this observation regarding the increased parity...i was just looking at the 2003 ALCS game logs and couldn't believe the pitching the Sox road to the brink of a trip to the WS...I know it was an offense for the ages but it didn't hurt that there were some really crummy teams. Ask Billy Beane if he thinks the competition is better than in years past...$30M is getting anybody to the playoffs anymore

#34 Smiling Joe Hesketh


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Posted 28 August 2007 - 01:43 PM

Sure, but being positive about this team's chances doesn't immediately invalidate one's opinion as not well thought-out.

You're still mad Teixeira ain't here, admit it.

Of course not. But let's not swing the other way completely and dismiss well-expressed concerns as knee-jerk negativity.

I'm over Teixeira. He broke my heart, but I'm over him.

#35 Pumpsie


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Posted 28 August 2007 - 01:44 PM

I'll address a couple of things that I think may be reasons for the attitude Skrub describes:

- The very nature of this year's pennant race. I think it's a fairly unique feeling to leap out early to a big lead and then see it slowly get whittled away as the season goes along. I don't think anyone expected that now-legendary 14.5 game lead over NY to stand up all season, but I do think it's fair to note that it's an unsettling feeling being the chased for once instead of the chasers. To see NY get red hot and slice the lead down to 4 games was not a lot of fun. I enjoyed it more in 2004 cutting NY's lead from 10 games to 2, even though this year the club is technically in a better position.

- The team's unusual consistency has perhaps made them appear less strong than they really are. Whereas in 2004 you had a 20-2 run late in the year, giving a hint that the team was special, this club has yet to have a winning streak over 5 games in 2007. They also do not have as many 9th inning comebacks this year as they've had in the past. While in the long run it really makes no difference in the quality of the team, in the short run it gives the appearance of maddening inconsistency. Add to that the mediocre months they've had recently (13-14 in June, 15-12 in July), plus the team's rather obvious flaws (disappointing seasons from Lugo and Drew, lack of HR power from Ortiz and Manny, Youkilis' terrible second half, leaving tons of runners on base) and it is a team where it's easier to point out the flaws rather than the strengths. As Frat pointed out, winning with pitching can be effective, but it ain't sexy.

- While the mantra of "best team in baseball" gets bandied about plenty, this year it strikes me as being less than a useful descriptor because there doesn't seem to be as many dominant teams this year as there were in past years. Nearly all of the divisional races are pretty close, and this year it certainly feels that any team that gets into the playoffs could win the whole thing. If it's a crapshoot, then it's tough to take a lot of solace in having the best record in baseball.

Look, if folks are going to be miserable there's not a lot anyone can do about it. Take their money like Skrub, or ignore them, or mock them if necessary. But let's not veer the other way and turn this into the Happy Sunshine Fun Forum. Discussion about the team is not necessarily negative.


Wow, what a fabulous, thoughtful post. I agree with everything SJH said here.

There's no one right way to be a fan. Some people are just, generally speaking, more confident than others. Also, some of us older fans who remember the really bad times are probably still suffering from all those years of fan abuse and are a little less cocky than younger fans who have known mostly success in regards to the Sox. The tent should be big enough for all of us.

This year IS "odd" in that the Sox pulling away to a 14 1/2 game lead is not the norm and that the closest comp is 1978 which ended quite painfully. But these are two very different teams, and Don Zimmer is nowhere near our dugout.

#36 V.I. Tessie

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Posted 28 August 2007 - 01:49 PM

I think with some of the "older" fans, it's been years and years of conditioning. To stop complaining about the Red Sox is like giving up smoking. You know you should, but you can't just bring yourself to do it.

#37 mangotree101

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Posted 28 August 2007 - 01:50 PM

I think it's easy to start this thread after the Sox just extended their lead in the division from 4 games to 8 games in about a week. But the simple truth is a 14 game lead turned into a 4 game lead with still plenty of games to be played. I don't think I could ever be called a negative fan, but I was nervous.

I've never lived in Boston and only listened to WEEI on MLB audio, so I haven't been affected by any negative mentality. The Sox just didn't play good baseball for an extended period of time, and many fans were worried.

But the only reason to be worried was a failure to realize that the current environment in the AL shouldn't allow any team to have a double-digit lead, and the 14.5 were always a mirage. We've had this conversation ad nauseam here, with a handful of negative posters insisting on the view that the Sox didn't play well "for an extended period of time," when it was very clear that this was neither true in absolute nor in relative terms. I still think this reaction has more to do with how differently this team achieves its success than other recent Sox teams.

I agree that the lack of spectacular, homerun-based offense for much of the season contributes to some people's wariness. I, for one, find this a much more exciting and interesting set of players to follow than any other Red Sox side in recent memory. I never liked Millar, so his dominance of the clubhouse kind of put me off. But this lot? I love the variety. The stories about the BP Pirates are great. There are so many unlikely heroes and unlikely story-lines. Who would have thought that Batshit, the scary wacko, would emerge as a go-to guy? Who could have predicted Oki? Wake with a shot at 20 wins? The silly competition between Youk and Pedroia earlier in the season (if only Youk could recover that levity!)? Lester? MDC's resurgence? If nothing else, I really enjoy listening to some of our guys' interviews -- they're so delightfully nuts (and not in the same pie-in-your-face pratfall vein as the 2004 incarnation...). Pedroia, Tavarez, Paps -- they're hilarious, and I particularly like the contrast between them and elder statesman Mike Lowell. This is a tremendously interesting and fun team, but less in your face than the Millar-troupe.

Edited by mangotree101, 28 August 2007 - 01:54 PM.


#38 MentalDisabldLst


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Posted 28 August 2007 - 01:50 PM

I haven't spent much time in the boston area this year, but in that time the people i've talked to at bars, functions, and around town have been actually MORE positive than any time I can remember since the week of 10/20 - 10/27 in 2004. I think this is a case of changed expectations, and Skrub's hardly the only one. What I mean is:

- Before 2004, the fanbase was dominantly pessimistic, and the SoSHers without a chemical imbalance were pleading with everyone to just be pragmatic. People said before the season that "on paper, this team is the best we've seen since 1978", and many around here kept up that attitude all year, but that was largely the exception.
- Now, I would say the fanbase is dominantly pragmatic, but SoSHers like Skrub expect everyone to be optimistic. There is, of course, a lot of reason to be optimistic. but I think our insistence on dragging the fanbase's spirits up, kicking and screaming though they may be, may be missing the fact that a lot of people's attitudes aren't nearly as dire as they were prior to 10/20/2004.

Right now those optimists among us all remember the cases where some Debbie Downer (insert SNL image) complained this year, but it hasn't been universal. WEEI still screens for those who will stir up controversy and keep people listening, but how many people like that do you meet when you go to a bar to watch a Sox game? Down here in NYC, most people at the Riv would agree that "Yeah, we'll probably win the division, and we're probably the best team in baseball", and have felt that way since May.

Just because they're not gushing about how &^%$ing amazing our bullpen is and how we have 3-4 good-to-great starters doesn't mean they're all Angry Bill.

edit: and for the record, I often find myself watching a game thinking, "God DAMN, is our pitching good!" and fist-pumping after every Dice-K strikeout or tavarez double play. Sure, it's a shift from the "yawn, another Manny 2-HR game" days, but it's just as fun.

Edited by MentalDisabldLst, 28 August 2007 - 01:53 PM.


#39 AusTexSoxFan

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Posted 28 August 2007 - 01:55 PM

Count me as one who thought we were in big time trouble just a couple weeks ago and especially after Gagne Meltdown Part III - The Water Bottle. That night I was ranting (including text message to Skrub) how much he sucked and that's when it finally dawned how much I like the 2007 Red Sox. They just go out there in unspectacular fashion and grind their way to victories a la late 1990s Yankees. Not exactly the most sexy way of winning, but winning nonetheless. I just hated how one player seemed to be ruining for the other 24. Luckily Gagne is starting to settle in (as many on here predicted he would... kudos), and ya gotta feel pretty damn good about the next two months. Let's enjoy this.

#40 Phil Nevin 23


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Posted 28 August 2007 - 01:59 PM

Looking at the remaining schedule, the Yankees should have at least a 45% chance of winning the Wildcard.

I wouldn't want to face the Yankees in a 5 game series, especially if I am the Cleveland Indians.

If we're fortunate enough to get past the Angels and meet up with the Yankees, then that's where the 'rubber meets the road'. Until then, let's be cautious about the AL EAST Division Victory Ceremony getting too out of hand, there will still be very hard work to do to keep Yankees fans and media from saying that 2004 was just a one-time event.

#41 behindthepen


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Posted 28 August 2007 - 02:00 PM

Do these dates mean anything to you?
8/1/06
10/1/05
5/28/04
6/11/03
6/26/02
7/2/01
The Sox led the division on those dates, but never won the East. When the team behind you scores 6 or 7 runs every game, I think you have a right to be nervous, unless you see that the life has been offically stomped from them. It's why I'm looking forward to, and at the same time nervous about, this series.

#42 TheoShmeo


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Posted 28 August 2007 - 02:05 PM

There are so many great posts in this thread already that I wont single out any other than to say that I'm glad Skrub started it.

Just a few things to add (or emphasize):

One, in my experience, the negativity or stress that Skrub describes and many others have described here and elsewhere is something that I think is overstated. I live in the NY area but go to a lot of games at Fenway and have family up there who I am regularly in touch with, and I'm always pleasantly surprised at how well Sox fans take losses. After a heavy dose of SoSH, I think I expect people to be racing for the nearest high building after some games, and that's hardly the case in my experience. I know that many of the fans at Fenway are casual fans, but certainly not all of them are, and many of the serious fans that I know or observe tend to bounce back pretty damned fast.

Two, the very nature of message boards in general and SoSH in particular is, as Drocca alluded to above, to analyze and discuss. That's a lot more given to picking things apart than celebrating. I was so Pete Carroll'd after Sunday's games that I very briefely considered typing some kind of "YAY!!!" post before I thought better of it. My point is that I'm genuinely enjoying the wins and the good times but I don't feel that I have much of an outlet for that here other than at the end of game threads. I'm sure others feel the same way.

Three, to the extent that I sense or experience the negativity, it's really because of the fact that this season has that all too familiar pattern of the Sox jumping out to a big lead and seeing it slowly fade away (even if it doesn't happen this time). It's one thing to rely on the very logical arguments that many have made as to why it shouldn't happen to this particular team, but when you're 44 and have experienced so many fumbled leads, including 1978 as a teenager, that sickening pattern is tough stuff. I think it's even harder for those of us who live or work in NY, and are surrounded by Yankee fans who are just waiting to serenade us with their "Red Sox Collapse Again" acts.

#43 Rasputin


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Posted 28 August 2007 - 02:13 PM

Say what you will about the Yawkeys, both good and bad, there was something not quite right in their management of the club, and those same mistakes were repeated year after year, especially IMHO when Tom and Jean became old and the team was largely managed as a 'trust'.

Watching the team these past few years, '06 and '07 especially has been like watching a computer run a mathematical model. The results are predictable, and repeatable.


The Yawkeys managed based on what they wanted to happen and the current management manages based on what is likely to happen and that makes all the difference.

#44 JimBoSox9


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Posted 28 August 2007 - 02:15 PM

The Sox led the division on those dates, but never won the East. When the team behind you scores 6 or 7 runs every game, I think you have a right to be nervous, unless you see that the life has been offically stomped from them. It's why I'm looking forward to, and at the same time nervous about, this series.


Of course you can be nervous. But isn't the whole point that the nega-philes, instead of simply recognizing that it's tough to play better than the Yanks when they are the hottest team in baseball and being happy that the Sox built themselves such a nice cushion, start blaming everyone from Theo to Tito to Tek to Tippacanoe for the disappearing lead? Especially considering that the run from 14.5 to 4 came during the July-August stretch of the season that everyone had already pointed out as an easy stretch for the Yanks and a tough stretch for the Sox.

#45 Rasputin


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Posted 28 August 2007 - 02:16 PM

I completely disagree. I think everybody knows the Yankees are COOKED w/r to the division title. People will go nuts if the Sox are swept, I'll give you that, because that'll happen regardless of the opponent.

My larger point is that nobody will care if the Red Sox win exactly one game.

Care to make it interesting?


I think this depends entirely on how you define "going nuts."

If we lose the first to games of this series, people will be pissed off because we just lost two to the Yankees including one where we should have had a sizeable edge, and we'll be facing the third game where the Yanks have an edge.

But if you ask who's going to win the division, we'll still be the overwhelming favorite.

#46 Rasputin


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Posted 28 August 2007 - 02:18 PM

I generally find SoSH to be one of the most optimistic subclasses of Sox fan.


I think this is true because generally the team has been pretty damn good in recent years. SOSH in the 1996-1999 period wasn't all that positive.

#47 yecul


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Posted 28 August 2007 - 02:21 PM

Of course you can be nervous. But isn't the whole point that the nega-philes, instead of simply recognizing that it's tough to play better than the Yanks when they are the hottest team in baseball and being happy that the Sox built themselves such a nice cushion, start blaming everyone from Theo to Tito to Tek to Tippacanoe for the disappearing lead?


Close. The point is to be able to pat ourselves on the back for being better fans than others. Good effort though.

#48 Fratboy


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Posted 28 August 2007 - 02:32 PM

I think this is true because generally the team has been pretty damn good in recent years. SOSH in the 1996-1999 period wasn't all that positive.

Was there even a SoSH then? Or was it just all part of the DTFC collective?

*****

Another reason for the pessimism this year is that in some measure, this team has been a surprise this season. PECOTA had the Yankees and Red Sox at a dead heat at the beginning of the year, with the two teams within 5 runs of each other on both the RS and RA sides, and with the best records in baseball at 93-69. This was a signal to me that the AL was becoming more compressed and that competitive balance would reign.

Mainstream pubs typically had the Red Sox finishing 3rd and the Wild Card going again to the Central division. The Red Sox would be competitive, but get shut out of the playoff mix by the end of the season.

When we saw the Sox jump out to the big start at 36-15, we weren't sure which was real: the performance after the Yankee tilt (about .500), or the performance of the team at the early part of the season (0.700 baby!). Turns out, like with most things, it was somewhere in the middle.

But unlike 2002, settling in at a .600 performance level is good enough for the best record in baseball not only by real world measures, but by sabermetric measures as well, due to the league compression and increased competitive balance (thank the Royals, Tigers, Indians and a weaker AL West). This is reminiscent of 2000, the most competitive leagues in the history of baseball, where you have no outstanding dominant team, but a bunch of good, but flawed teams duking it out for bragging rights.

Is this the best Red Sox team of all time? Likely not. I'd probably put the 1978 and 1977 teams ahead of this, with the 2007, 2004, and 2003 teams in the discussion as well. But it very well could be the best of 2007. Let's hope there's a World Series Championship to go along with the paper title.

#49 Paul M


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Posted 28 August 2007 - 02:34 PM

On the one hand, I also don't get how anyone could be negative.

The team has maintained a truly historic advantage for almost the entire season. An amazing pitching staff with a nice mix of veterans and younger arms, and new arms that have been fun to watch. Same thing on offense, though not quite as potent as last year.

On the other hand, new acquisitions that cost the team both $ and an important draft pick had long periods of complete abyssmal play, plus the play of the starting CF for 2 months was awful (at the plate). The bench was weak and the team made some fundamental mistakes almost nightly for a stretch.

For me, though, 2004 changed my life. The daily ebbs and flows rarely generate a strong positive or negative reaction. I look at the game of baseball more holistically and the Red Sox are the center of it, but not the whole reason I am a baseball fan. It's quite refreshing really, to watch some random games and not be a hostage to every single pitch. Maybe my diehard Sox fan might be revoked but I won't be yelling and screaming about a loss here or there.

Yet, when I went to the Orioles game and I saw what I thought was poor management and took the loss in person, I got that same irrational response and anger that I used to get. And I was in Fenway South, Camden, and 30% of the fans were pissed like me, and the rest were not. If pushed to associate with a group, I still would opt for the fanatics everytime.

What we can bring to SoSH is a blend of the cool and rational discussion of the Red Sox and baseball, but I almost envy those that can get worked up--we know who they are so no need to single anyone out--over every 40-man roster move or decision to not bring in XYZ, and express this displeasure almost daily. So, while I am not and never was a fan of the sky is falling posts after every loss, the real, true fans will always care too much. I'm in the middle, which I guess is my home on here.

Edit:

Worst three months in the 11 years I've seen on "SoSH":

1. August 2001
2. August 2006
3. August 2005

Even October 2003 was filled with some glimmer of hope, plus they did rise to beat the A's. But, let's just skip August from now on.

#50 Bucknahs Bum Ankle


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Posted 28 August 2007 - 02:53 PM

Worst three months in the 11 years I've seen on "SoSH":

1. August 2001
2. August 2006
3. August 2005

Even October 2003 was filled with some glimmer of hope, plus they did rise to beat the A's. But, let's just skip August from now on.

Don't forget that August 2004 was pretty sweet (21-7). Plus this August is turning out to be very nice in it's own right. For me, the highs always outweigh the lows (especially when we're in the midst of one).

Edited by Bucknahs Bum Ankle, 28 August 2007 - 02:53 PM.