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SOSH

OK we're back on our main server.  It was taking a super long time to move *everything* back just to save a day's worth of messages.  I've been at this all day now and need to get back to my real job so.,... sorry.  Working on a better plan in case this happens again.  nip

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SOSH Running Dogs


2431 replies to this topic

#1 Catch Me Bruno


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Posted 27 May 2007 - 10:55 AM

Are there any other tools into running here? I looked for a thread with this but couldn't find one (except for the 2007 Boston Marathon). I just started running a couple of years ago, and I really like it. I just ran as part of a relay team today in Burlington VT's Keybank Marathon. 6.5 miles, with a 1/2 mile hillclimb kicker at the end. I ran a 1/2 marathon in early April but my training has fallen off since then, so my race time today was mediocre. Glad to do the run, though, I always am afterwards. Except for the sore nips.

Running is for cowards, but if you're going to be a coward, be a good coward and get away. That way you won't have to urinate on yourself and hope the disgust overwhelms your predator and then you can make your escape.

#2 Tudor Fever

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Posted 27 May 2007 - 02:31 PM

IIRC there were a couple of good running threads on the old board, plus this one on the new board that ran for about a year.

There seem to be a number of hard-core runners on SoSH. I'm not one of them but I do run quite a bit, even though I suck at it. I've run the Maine Marathon half-marathon each of the past five years, except in 2005 when I ran my one and only full marathon there, albeit at a snail's pace (4:47). Also the Beach to Beacon 10K, generally to raise $ for a local charity. Partly because I'm getting up there in age, I use the Jeff Galloway method of taking regular walk breaks.

This summer, I'd like to run a few other local races in the 5-10K range. It's almost always a good time, especially if you let go of trying to run fast and just enjoy the scene and the spectacle (including the hot running babes.)

For sore nips, try this stuff before you run. Problem solved.

#3 BleacherFan

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Posted 28 May 2007 - 12:33 PM

Are there any other tools into running here? I looked for a thread with this but couldn't find one (except for the 2007 Boston Marathon). I just started running a couple of years ago, and I really like it. I just ran as part of a relay team today in Burlington VT's Keybank Marathon. 6.5 miles, with a 1/2 mile hillclimb kicker at the end. I ran a 1/2 marathon in early April but my training has fallen off since then, so my race time today was mediocre. Glad to do the run, though, I always am afterwards. Except for the sore nips.

Running is for cowards, but if you're going to be a coward, be a good coward and get away. That way you won't have to urinate on yourself and hope the disgust overwhelms your predator and then you can make your escape.


Pretty serious runner here - started three years ago and it's developed into a fun hobby I was good at. Currently, giving my body a break after the New England Grand Prix spring racing series and Boston. Next on the horizon for me is Mt. Washington and then building some speed before I start to build base for a 1/2 marathon in the fall. I would like to to break 16:30 for a 5k, 34 for a 10k and 1:17 for the half.

#4 underhandtofirst


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Posted 06 July 2007 - 06:59 AM

I got back into the running mode the last few years. I ran track in HS (400, 800, 600y, 1000y indoor). A couple years ago I started just to get into better shape and used a goal as qualifying for Boston at some point. Back 18 months ago I ran a 1:46 half then last fall I finished a marathon in 3:38, but to qualify for Boston I've got to get down to 3:15. I've run some shorter races that convert up to close to 3:15-3:20 pace (20:36 5k, 12:30 2m), but there's a big difference in length of race so I've got a lot of training to do. I used Hal Higdon's novice program last year just to finish a marathon and I'm using Runner's World's Intermediate 16 week program for this fall's marathon.

I second Tudor's recommendation. I started using it last year and it works great. It prevents blisters on the feet too.

Edited by underhandtofirst, 06 July 2007 - 07:02 AM.


#5 TallerThanPedroia


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Posted 15 July 2007 - 07:20 AM

I've got similar goals. I started running last June while studying for the bar, mostly because I think I would have died if I kept eating poorly and never exercising. And I was always a swimmer/soccer kinda guy and always made fun of runners, so now I'm now duly humbled.

My plan is to qualify for Boston before I'm 30, which gives me until the 2010 marathon. I have to do it in 3:10. I ran the Run to Remember Half Marathon in May in 1:58, so I've got work to do, but I've given myself plenty of time. It's all about setting reasonable, obtainable goals. My goal for the Half was to finish under a 10 minute pace, and I finished at about 9.

I'm currently training for the Bay State Marathon using Hal Higdon's novice program. I also used that for the Half marathon, although only partially, since I've never been able to run several days in a row. But this week I finally did, running T-Th and Saturday, and now I'm off to the pool to swim a couple of miles.

#6 Catch Me Bruno


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Posted 19 July 2007 - 04:10 PM

I notice a couple of folks mention Higdon here - he was recommended to me by a another (real) runner here in the office, so I followed his half-marathon training schedule pretty closely. Great stuff to use if you're starting out. I find that if I plan my runs out every week, put them on my Outlook calendar, I tend to follow it pretty closely, almost religiously, once I start training.

I ran the 1/2 in about 2:10, and I was pretty happy that. Thanks Hal!

#7 BleacherFan

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Posted 21 July 2007 - 08:45 AM

Anyone have any planned races coming up? I really have nothing on the radar until the fall when I will be running the Apple Harvest 10M and I'm leaning towards the Portsmouth half in November. I've just been doing a lot of training focusing on getting faster - in another couple of weeks I will start increasing my base a little for these longer races.

#8 Metrician

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Posted 21 July 2007 - 11:02 PM

http://www.washingto...7072101335.html

Alan Webb, a graduate of South Lakes High School in Reston, broke the American record in the mile last night in Brasschaat, Belgium, with a time of 3 minutes 46.91 seconds, besting the mark of 3:47.69 set by Steve Scott in 1982.

I'm all for celebrating a 5'9, balding, nonPED taking, white guy anytime. Good for Mr.Webb, 3:46.9 is smokin!

Edited by Metrician, 21 July 2007 - 11:02 PM.


#9 ichirob4ichiro

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Posted 23 July 2007 - 06:12 AM

I'm all for celebrating a 5'9, balding, nonPED taking, white guy anytime. Good for Mr.Webb, 3:46.9 is smokin!


And that is after the hair plugs for Alan. In H.S. the poor guy looked damn near 40. But good for him. He looks alot better. He probably knew he was going to get alot of attention this season with the world champs coming up and attempting records and all- His agent probably told him it was time for a fix.
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#10 Tudor Fever

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Posted 24 July 2007 - 02:27 PM

Anyone have any planned races coming up? I really have nothing on the radar until the fall when I will be running the Apple Harvest 10M and I'm leaning towards the Portsmouth half in November. I've just been doing a lot of training focusing on getting faster - in another couple of weeks I will start increasing my base a little for these longer races.

I'll be running the Beach to Beacon next week. Very nice event. Quite crowded, which is fine if you're not concerned about time.

#11 BleacherFan

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Posted 25 July 2007 - 06:02 AM

Ah nice, I've always heard great things about that race - I need to get up there one year for that. B2B always remimds me that this is the time of the year when the African runners come to New England for the prize money. In years past they would start in Reading for the Showcase 5M (no prize money this year so they skipped), off to Maine for B2B, Newburyport 10M next week, and assorted races ending with the Falmouth RR.

Edited by BleacherFan, 25 July 2007 - 06:03 AM.


#12 TallerThanPedroia


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Posted 25 July 2007 - 07:23 PM

So BleacherFan, who else is running the Bay State, or were you just remembering what I posted here without connecting the names?

#13 BleacherFan

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Posted 26 July 2007 - 07:31 AM

So BleacherFan, who else is running the Bay State, or were you just remembering what I posted here without connecting the names?


Underhandtofirst I believe is running also. How's the training going?

#14 TallerThanPedroia


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Posted 26 July 2007 - 08:24 AM

I'm on week 7 of 18 in Higdon's novice program. Slightly modified to fit where I run down at Castle Island. But I'll have run 20 miles this week, which is a new weekly record for me. I don't hit a new distance record until week 11 on the long run.

What do you think of my plan to qualify for Boston by the 2010 marathon (need a 3:10 to qualify)? Doable, assuming I finish Bay State around 4 hours?

#15 BleacherFan

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Posted 26 July 2007 - 08:48 AM

I'm on week 7 of 18 in Higdon's novice program. Slightly modified to fit where I run down at Castle Island. But I'll have run 20 miles this week, which is a new weekly record for me. I don't hit a new distance record until week 11 on the long run.

What do you think of my plan to qualify for Boston by the 2010 marathon (need a 3:10 to qualify)? Doable, assuming I finish Bay State around 4 hours?


I think that's a good plan. It's nice to know that you're giving yourself time to 'grow' into running and for your legs to get used to increased milage. A 3:10 is a goal that shouldn't be considered easy and giving yourself a few years to build up the milage and speed is a good thing. You only work on getting hurt if you try to build speed and milage at the same time.

IIRC, the weather for the run to remember was sunny with some heat - but it wasn't really hot. Did you feel good after running that? Have you been running a solid base since then? Depending on your milage you might want to increase your goal to maybe a 3:45 or so. Baystate isn't that hard of a course but you have to run it right and conserve some energy for the 2nd loop.

#16 TallerThanPedroia


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Posted 26 July 2007 - 09:48 AM

IIRC, the weather for the run to remember was sunny with some heat - but it wasn't really hot. Did you feel good after running that? Have you been running a solid base since then? Depending on your milage you might want to increase your goal to maybe a 3:45 or so. Baystate isn't that hard of a course but you have to run it right and conserve some energy for the 2nd loop.


I had some serious trouble walking up and down stairs after the race - probably didn't help that I was drinking beers all day afterwards. I think I ran a pretty good race. The thing with me is that my cardio has always been ahead of my legs. A lot of the people I finished around were breathing much harder than me, for instance. So I felt pretty good after the race until my knees started complaining.

I think I'm finally at a point where my legs are all caught up to my cardio, in fact I think my legs may have jumped ahead. I took a week off after the race, then ran a 5k the next Sunday. Took another week off, ran a 10 mile nice and easy. Since then my weekly miles have been: 9, 8, 11, 12, 19, 10, and 20 this week. I had to do that big jump from 12 to 19, but I've run that far before. The difference now is I'm running T,W,Th and Saturday. I could never run multiple days like that before. From here on out it's basically a 10% increase every week, until I get to 36 miles (3, 10, 3, 20), then I taper back for the marathon. I have no interest in getting injured.

#17 BleacherFan

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Posted 26 July 2007 - 10:02 AM

I had some serious trouble walking up and down stairs after the race - probably didn't help that I was drinking beers all day afterwards. I think I ran a pretty good race. The thing with me is that my cardio has always been ahead of my legs. A lot of the people I finished around were breathing much harder than me, for instance. So I felt pretty good after the race until my knees started complaining.

I think I'm finally at a point where my legs are all caught up to my cardio, in fact I think my legs may have jumped ahead. I took a week off after the race, then ran a 5k the next Sunday. Took another week off, ran a 10 mile nice and easy. Since then my weekly miles have been: 9, 8, 11, 12, 19, 10, and 20 this week. I had to do that big jump from 12 to 19, but I've run that far before. The difference now is I'm running T,W,Th and Saturday. I could never run multiple days like that before. From here on out it's basically a 10% increase every week, until I get to 36 miles (3, 10, 3, 20), then I taper back for the marathon. I have no interest in getting injured.


That's good - cardio is easy to lose but quick to gain back. You're taking a nice conversative approach which is good - I always like to run a half mary about 3-4 weeks before my marathons. Some people do it all out and some people will run it at their PMP (planned marathon pace).

#18 Doug Beerabelli


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Posted 26 July 2007 - 12:12 PM

I am decidedly not in running shape right now, but have run the Falmouth RR 6 of the last 10 years. I'll be there spectating, but my wife and friends will be running it.

It's a beating usually (7 miles for an August 10 a.m. Sunday start), but the course is really quite beautiful, although the breeze you might expect off the water is usually a myth, and the T&A factor is off the charts. Mesmerizing to get behind a nice arse for a half mile or so--takes away the pain.

I've vowed to get in shape to do the Manchester RR on Thanksgiving morning in CT. A little under 5 miles. Last year, I spectated for my wife and friends, and my brother in law and I found a nice bar near the finish line that was far more endearing than the thought of running 5 miles in the rain.

For marathons, I've heard the Hartford Marathon, run in October, is a pretty fair, flat course which is a good one to try to qualify for Boston. Not that I'll ever be doing either.

#19 TallerThanPedroia


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Posted 26 July 2007 - 12:22 PM

It's a beating usually (7 miles for an August 10 a.m. Sunday start), but the course is really quite beautiful, although the breeze you might expect off the water is usually a myth, and the T&A factor is off the charts. Mesmerizing to get behind a nice arse for a half mile or so--takes away the pain.


Oh man, during my half, I found some knockout girl who was running a perfect 9 minute mile. I followed her for like 8 miles, but lost her during a water stop. Never did see her from the front :P

#20 ReadySetTiant

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Posted 26 July 2007 - 12:50 PM

... I've vowed to get in shape to do the Manchester RR on Thanksgiving morning in CT.
... For marathons, I've heard the Hartford Marathon, run in October, is a pretty fair, flat course which is a good one to try to qualify for Boston. ...


Ah come on; you don't need to be in shape for Manchester. It's more of a traditional festival than a real race. Lots of fun and too many people.

Hartford Marathon has been a well organized event for serious runners. Though sometimes plagued with bad weather, it's a nice time of year to do a marathon in New England.

#21 BleacherFan

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Posted 26 July 2007 - 12:57 PM

Ah come on; you don't need to be in shape for Manchester. It's more of a traditional festival than a real race. Lots of fun and too many people.

Hartford Marathon has been a well organized event for serious runners. Though sometimes plagued with bad weather, it's a nice time of year to do a marathon in New England.


Manchester is also loaded with talent - i think there were about 30 people who went sub 25 at that race. Helps to have all that prize money!

#22 ReadySetTiant

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Posted 26 July 2007 - 01:26 PM

Manchester is also loaded with talent - i think there were about 30 people who went sub 25 at that race. Helps to have all that prize money!



Unless you're at the head of the line, it's tough to weave your way through that crowd. Might as well not sweat it; it's a good way to work up an appetite for a big dinner.

Edit: Here are a few more fun runs coming up in CT:
http://www.courant.c...0,4984427.story

Edited by ReadySetTiant, 26 July 2007 - 01:31 PM.


#23 Doug Beerabelli


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Posted 26 July 2007 - 03:05 PM

Ah come on; you don't need to be in shape for Manchester. It's more of a traditional festival than a real race. Lots of fun and too many people.

Hartford Marathon has been a well organized event for serious runners. Though sometimes plagued with bad weather, it's a nice time of year to do a marathon in New England.



There was a time, pre kids (6 years ago), that I could still get out of bed and do 3 miles no problem, or would have done Manchester on a whim with minimal training. In fact, the one time I did Manchester, that's how I ran it.

It clearly is now a problem. I did a couple mile, 1.5ers on my treadmill recently to get the legs in shape, and then ran a two mile run outside. My time was surprisingly decent for me despite my trying to just keep it steady--that's 10 minute miles--but my legs tightened up/ached like I had just run Falmouth w/o sufficient training. 3+ days to recover.

I know you get through that by running through it, but carrying way too much weight plus creaky knees means I'm going to have to ease my back up to that level.

#24 ReadySetTiant

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Posted 26 July 2007 - 03:26 PM

...It clearly is now a problem. I did a couple mile, 1.5ers on my treadmill recently to get the legs in shape, and then ran a two mile run outside. ... --but my legs tightened up/ached like I had just run Falmouth w/o sufficient training. 3+ days to recover.



How about this. Try warming up with 3 miles on the bike. Then do 3 quarters of a mile on treadmill at your 10 min pace. And repeat a couple more sets of that. 3mi bike 3/4 mi treadmill. Then cool down on the bike for a while.

That would give you a good hour cv workout that might reduce your recovery time. ATB.

#25 Doug Beerabelli


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Posted 26 July 2007 - 03:40 PM

How about this. Try warming up with 3 miles on the bike. Then do 3 quarters of a mile on treadmill at your 10 min pace. And repeat a couple more sets of that. 3mi bike 3/4 mi treadmill. Then cool down on the bike for a while.

That would give you a good hour cv workout that might reduce your recovery time. ATB.


That would work. Finding the hour to devote to that (or being good about doing this at 9:30 at night when my kids and wife are in bed) has been the harder part.

I gotta say, it was weird and disconcerting to be so sore after so short a run. And popping a few Advil and toughing through the next day's workout is about the best way to get through it. I used to do that no problem, and minus the Advil.

I'm gittin' old. :rolleyes:

#26 ReadySetTiant

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Posted 26 July 2007 - 04:54 PM

...Finding the hour to devote to that ...has been the harder part.



I hear you. Personally I would look to find an hour before work. When you've got the strength to get through the day. Be sure to stretch quads/calves/hammies/I-bands after to shorten your recovery and avoid injury. The important thing is to 'just do it' as they say.

#27 Doug Beerabelli


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Posted 26 July 2007 - 09:36 PM

Agreed. To do that, I'd have to be up by about 5:45 every day, as my wife is out of the house by 6:45 to 7. and then I'm on my own with the 6 year old and 2 year old. I'm not a morning person unless compelled by force.

I've got boatloads of excuses. :buddy: Once the little guy gets old enough, supervision won't be quite as much an issue.

I've got time to do it at night, I have to, as you said, just do it.

#28 Catch Me Bruno


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Posted 29 July 2007 - 06:02 PM

Oh man, during my half, I found some knockout girl who was running a perfect 9 minute mile. I followed her for like 8 miles, but lost her during a water stop. Never did see her from the front :smithicide:


Funny how little things are quite distracting on the course, which can be a good thing. Less time thinking about pain or how far you have to go.

#29 Tudor Fever

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Posted 29 July 2007 - 08:20 PM

Word. The underclothed athletic eye candy is a major counterbalance to going through the pain and aggravation of running in these events.

#30 BleacherFan

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Posted 30 July 2007 - 08:11 AM

Word. The underclothed athletic eye candy is a major counterbalance to going through the pain and aggravation of running in these events.


During my last race, I had the unfortuate luck of running behind Jen Toomey for a mile or so - what a sight.

Quick aside, any one know any good places in MA for cheap shoes? I generally order online for exact styles and sizes I've used in the past and I go to the NB outlet store in Lawrence for cheap shoes. Any other local outlet stores around? I think Reebok is in Kittery but thats kinda of a hike.

#31 Frisbetarian


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Posted 30 July 2007 - 08:57 AM

Agreed. To do that, I'd have to be up by about 5:45 every day, as my wife is out of the house by 6:45 to 7. and then I'm on my own with the 6 year old and 2 year old. I'm not a morning person unless compelled by force.

I've got boatloads of excuses. :buddy: Once the little guy gets old enough, supervision won't be quite as much an issue.

I've got time to do it at night, I have to, as you said, just do it.


A baby jogger and a bicycle solves your problem, push the little guy and have the older one ride alongside.

Quick aside, any one know any good places in MA for cheap shoes? I generally order online for exact styles and sizes I've used in the past and I go to the NB outlet store in Lawrence for cheap shoes. Any other local outlet stores around? I think Reebok is in Kittery but thats kinda of a hike.


There is a Saucony outlet in Danvers at the Endicott Plaza (by Ski Market).

#32 Doug Beerabelli


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Posted 30 July 2007 - 10:12 AM

Well, Fris, I'd have to wake them up at night to do that, as I've got roughy an hour to 1.5 hours to get them ready and us out the door in the morning, which doesn't allow for a 30 minute jog with 5 minutes of stretching/cooldown. And I sure as heck ain't waking them up early to join me for a morning jog :buddy:

It's this dang full time job thing. I get home around 6 pm, or later, cook dinner or play with kids while wife does it, that leaves an hour of awake time with one, and two with the older one. I would feel wrong utilizing that awake time to exercise, although we do family walks around the hood on occasion. This doesn't count the nights I've got meetings for work and non work related stuff, which averages once a week, sometimes more. I guess I could jog stroll during that time, maybe I'll try that. But it's easier just to exercise after they go to bed.

I've got time, although not the most ideal time, at night, and a treadmill in the basement I've used in past. And weekends I can find time no problem. I just have to make it happen.

#33 TallerThanPedroia


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Posted 30 July 2007 - 11:33 AM

During my last race, I had the unfortuate luck of running behind Jen Toomey for a mile or so - what a sight.

Quick aside, any one know any good places in MA for cheap shoes? I generally order online for exact styles and sizes I've used in the past and I go to the NB outlet store in Lawrence for cheap shoes. Any other local outlet stores around? I think Reebok is in Kittery but thats kinda of a hike.


Define cheap. I just spent $70 at the New Balance in Brighton. I personally don't consider that cheap, but this is a new market for me.

#34 BleacherFan

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Posted 30 July 2007 - 12:21 PM

Define cheap. I just spent $70 at the New Balance in Brighton. I personally don't consider that cheap, but this is a new market for me.


40-50$ a pair is what I like to pay for trainers. When you're banging out 300+ miles a month - it gets expensive buying shoes for 80-90$ at the regular sporting goods store. Last week I picked up two pairs of shoes at NB for 80$ total - I also got a pair of my Asics trainers for 65$ including shipping (2110s).

Edit: Thanks for the Saucony reminder - I haven't been there in years since they were off Centennial Drive

Edited by BleacherFan, 30 July 2007 - 12:58 PM.


#35 TallerThanPedroia


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Posted 30 July 2007 - 02:22 PM

When you're banging out 300+ miles a month


Yeah, not so much...

#36 Frisbetarian


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Posted 30 July 2007 - 05:20 PM

40-50$ a pair is what I like to pay for trainers. When you're banging out 300+ miles a month - it gets expensive buying shoes for 80-90$ at the regular sporting goods store. Last week I picked up two pairs of shoes at NB for 80$ total - I also got a pair of my Asics trainers for 65$ including shipping (2110s).

Edit: Thanks for the Saucony reminder - I haven't been there in years since they were off Centennial Drive


Check out the back wall first for the "seconds." I've been lucky enough to get some great running shoes for real short $$$ (like $20) there because they made a simple mistake like put the wrong color on the sole of the shoe.

And Beers, I cannot recommend a baby jogger enough. It's not just the fact that you get the chance to run when perhaps you may not have without one (weekends, or a whole family thing), but it is also a great way to spend time with your kids outside. I guess there's the whole showing them the value of exercise thing, but for me the chance to talk and listen uninterupted for long stretches of time was more of a benefit. Also, I used to run trails with my son and we got to learn a lot about nature type stuff together. VG, but cool for a guy that grew up a city kid. Finally, the workout is kickass. Good luck.

Edited by Frisbetarian, 30 July 2007 - 05:26 PM.


#37 DukeSox


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Posted 30 July 2007 - 10:19 PM

So I'm 23 y.o. and just started running again since high school, when I ran to train for soccer. Over the course of the last 4-6 months or so, I've gotten up to running for about an hour and covering 8 miles or so, 3 times a week. Lately, I've tried to push it past that by 15 min or so and can really feel it in my knees and lower back after finishing, unlike when I used to run in high school (getting older, obviously).

Basically, whats the consensus on the long-term downsides to running? Obviously its super good for you all around, but if I continue to run regularly, will I need knee replacements at the age of 40? Perhaps that is hyperbole, but my H.S. soccer coach needed dual-knee replacement around that age, and that didn't seem too fun for him.

Lately, I've tried to alternate by doing machine work for an hour (treadmill, elliptical, bike, etc.) -- lower impact, but I hate being inside.

Have there been any definite correlations found between long-term running and joint problems? What about personal experience?

#38 BleacherFan

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Posted 31 July 2007 - 07:58 AM

So I'm 23 y.o. and just started running again since high school, when I ran to train for soccer. Over the course of the last 4-6 months or so, I've gotten up to running for about an hour and covering 8 miles or so, 3 times a week. Lately, I've tried to push it past that by 15 min or so and can really feel it in my knees and lower back after finishing, unlike when I used to run in high school (getting older, obviously).

Basically, whats the consensus on the long-term downsides to running? Obviously its super good for you all around, but if I continue to run regularly, will I need knee replacements at the age of 40? Perhaps that is hyperbole, but my H.S. soccer coach needed dual-knee replacement around that age, and that didn't seem too fun for him.

Lately, I've tried to alternate by doing machine work for an hour (treadmill, elliptical, bike, etc.) -- lower impact, but I hate being inside.

Have there been any definite correlations found between long-term running and joint problems? What about personal experience?


I don't know about long term affects, but when I started running and started increasing my milage, I found a lot of quirky injuries for the first few years. After that it's like my body got used to running and the associated motions. Don't get me wrong, I still get the occasional knot and sore achilles but it's more overuse related or faulty 'equipment' (shoes with too much milage). Also, after my first couple of marathons also, I had knee tendonitis which sidelined me for a few months, whch I found was from underdeveloped quads. As I increased milage in subsequent marathons I found it easier to recover - insufficient training I guess.

It's funny, some people think the more milage, the less chance of injury and some people think the opposite. It's like what Radatz said about pitchcounts ///

#39 TallerThanPedroia


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Posted 27 September 2007 - 09:59 AM

So, how's everyone doing?

I just finished my 40 mile week (5, 10, 5, 20) and now I'm tapering down for the marathon. I've definitely lost speed, and while my goal remains to just cross the finish line, I'll be surprised if I do it in better than a 10 minute mile (I did the half in 9).

edit:

Also, someone talk to me about running in the rain, especially with respect to clothing. I've had perfect weather for just about every single run this summer, so I'm expecting a monsoon for the marathon itself.

Edited by Steve Brady, 27 September 2007 - 10:03 AM.


#40 ReadySetTiant

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Posted 28 September 2007 - 08:05 AM

Also, someone talk to me about running in the rain, especially with respect to clothing. I've had perfect weather for just about every single run this summer, so I'm expecting a monsoon for the marathon itself.


Steve,

Vaseline. On your feet. Load it up, cake it on. Before you put your socks on. This will repel all the water and prevent blisters (even if it's not raining).

If you're not good in cold weather wear longer shorts and tape them around your legs. Tape or bandaids on your boobies.

Wear a baseball cap to keep the water out of your eyes. Cut holes in a trash bag for your head and arms to wear like a poncho if you need to repel water; it will get warm in there so you may end up discarding it, but it will keep you warm if you're a cold runner.

Hope this helps. Best of luck.

#41 BleacherFan

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Posted 28 September 2007 - 03:38 PM

I don't know about long term affects, but when I started running and started increasing my milage, I found a lot of quirky injuries for the first few years. After that it's like my body got used to running and the associated motions. Don't get me wrong, I still get the occasional knot and sore achilles but it's more overuse related or faulty 'equipment' (shoes with too much milage). Also, after my first couple of marathons also, I had knee tendonitis which sidelined me for a few months, whch I found was from underdeveloped quads. As I increased milage in subsequent marathons I found it easier to recover - insufficient training I guess.

It's funny, some people think the more milage, the less chance of injury and some people think the opposite. It's like what Radatz said about pitchcounts ///


Funny I've been saying the same as well. My training has gone well - up to about 6 straight weeks of 70+ miles. I set a PR at the USATF-NE championship last week - ran a 56:21 in some tough conditions. Still got the Portsmouth 1/2 on the radar and maybe some little stuff along the way.

Another week or so then your taper for Baystate starts right?

#42 underhandtofirst


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Posted 28 September 2007 - 04:06 PM

I'm in my taper for the Bay State Marathon now. My goal is 3:15 to qualify, but I think I'm going to need perfect conditions and pacing to do it. Last year I ran 3:38 and I maxed out at 40 miles in the one week I ran a 20 miler. This year I've gone up to 50 in 3 different weeks. I ran 18+ miles in 5 weeks including 20 in 3 weeks. I did stepped up to 5 days a week running and did harder runs on Tues and Thurs. I've found I've been recovering much better compared to last year.

I feel like I should run under 3:25 unless its really hot out, 3:20 is my realistic goal, and 3:15 if I have it all together.

Steve, last year I had a goal of crossing the line. I was surprised how great I felt at the 13 mile mark and subconsiously picked up the pace about 10 seconds per mile. It came back to bite me around mile 18. The last 4-5 miles were not fun at all as I slowed down by about 1 minute per mile. Best of luck. Let's hope for a nice 50 degree day with no wind.

#43 TallerThanPedroia


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Posted 29 September 2007 - 06:56 PM

I'm tapering as well, did my 40/20 week last week. Today I ran 12 just around 10:00, including walking/water breaks, and I feel great. Short runs for the next two weeks.

Finishing = very happy.
< 4:20 = ecstatic.


I'm in my taper for the Bay State Marathon now. My goal is 3:15 to qualify, but I think I'm going to need perfect conditions and pacing to do it. Last year I ran 3:38


I hope you qualify, because you'll give me hope that I'll be able to do so by 2010.

#44 biollante


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Posted 03 October 2007 - 04:38 AM

New Marathon Record:

"Gebrselassie’s record run of 2 hours 4 minutes 26 seconds for the 26.2 miles."

http://www.nytimes.c...s/o...&ei=5087

This time blows my mind.

Berlin must be a good place for running the marathon.

#45 BleacherFan

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Posted 04 October 2007 - 01:44 PM

New Marathon Record:

"Gebrselassie’s record run of 2 hours 4 minutes 26 seconds for the 26.2 miles."

http://www.nytimes.c...s/o...&ei=5087

This time blows my mind.

Berlin must be a good place for running the marathon.


Well it is where Tergat set the record back in 03 - pretty fast/flat and the weather usually cooperates. The amazing thing is the guy owns like 20+ world records now - he is on an amazing streak. The jump from the 10k to the marathon is never an easy one and he continues to amaze me by how easy he makes it look. 26.2 at a 4.44 clip - unfreakinbelivable. NYC should be interesting this year - even without the elite Americans. Watch for Samuel Wanjiru, the current half marathon record holder making his marathon debut - it will be interesting to see how the 20 year old does.

#46 TallerThanPedroia


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Posted 05 October 2007 - 08:30 AM

it will be interesting to see how the 20 year old does.


Ugh, now I feel slow and old.

#47 BleacherFan

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Posted 05 October 2007 - 03:51 PM

Ugh, now I feel slow and old.


Well, besides a couple of the local Olympic qualifiers in my club, most of the best runners I know are over 40.

If it makes you feel any better :)

#48 sass a thon

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Posted 06 October 2007 - 11:01 AM

Just ran my first 15K (in around 1:35), and it was hot and humid, as is so often the case in Texas. It started at 8am, which was at least an hour too late. The planners probably should have realized that, but I guess it's a good test. I figure my time will be a couple minutes better once the weather gets cooler. And on the bright side, I felt strongest the last third of the race, which is always what you want.

I don't know how people run marathons - it still truly amazes me that your bodies can do that. A half marathon is so going to be my limit. Of course, last year I couldn't fathom finishing a 5K without walking.

#49 TallerThanPedroia


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Posted 06 October 2007 - 07:19 PM

If it makes you feel any better


It's okay, I ran a great last 8-miler today and am optimistic again B)

Also: go Sass!

#50 underhandtofirst


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Posted 07 October 2007 - 09:02 AM

I just finished my final "long" run in preparation for Bay State next Sunday. It was probably a bit fast (7:58/mi for 8.5mi), but it was a nice even pace and my HR was consistent in the mid 140s. I live pretty close to the marathon course (1.5 mi from the 4 mile mark) so I ran out anf back along the 4 to 6.5 mile section of the course.

This year I ran many more miles at higher intensity. I worked up from 18 to 30 mpw at low intensity (HR in 130s) over the winter and spring with a short 6 week ramp up for a 5k in early February. The low intensity running and gradual increase in mileage made training much more successful this year. Last year I peaked at 39 miles and this year I had 4 weeks 45-49. I felt I recovered much faster.

My biggest problem was sleeping the day before my Tues tempo runs, Thurs track workouts and weekend long runs. I would get so fired up thinking about them I wouldnt get enough sleep (<6 hours often). My goal was to finish my training runs by 7am to be back in time to help get my 3 kids ready. That wasnt so bad for 7 mile tempo runs, but for 20 mile long runs I was on the road by 4am. Yeah, not very smart training. I wont even get into the nights I was up watching the Sox until 11pm! Some of those games were tough to wind down from, especially in September.

The weather for the week looks like showers every day with temps in the low to mid 60s through the weekend. Lows in the 40s. I know the race isnt for 7 days, but I like to look ahead. I'd love it to stay in the 40s and 50s for the race as I think that is my best chance to get 3:15.

Steve, good luck next week. I made the mistake of getting fired up during miles 11-13 because it is slightly downhill and I paid for it later as I carried the same pace through miles 13-16 which is really the only part of the course with any hills to speak of. When I say hills they arent very tough or long, but its a change up from the rest of the course. During my training I found I was 10-15 seconds per miles faster for the part of the course for miles 11-13 (21-23 also) than I was for 4-6 when I used the same effort.




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