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Updates for MS Office

Discussion in 'BYTE ME: Technology discussion' started by charlieoscar, Nov 30, 2017.

  1. charlieoscar

    charlieoscar Member

    Messages:
    906
    Win 8.1/ am currently running Office 2010 (whatever the basic upgrade was from Win 2003--I kept 2003 because I didn't feel like buying another version of Access). Problem is that every time Windows pushes upgrades/security patches, they want to do both Office 2003 and 2010.

    I've been skipping any that are for Office 2003 unless they are specifically marked for Access. Is this a mistake?
     
  2. edoug

    edoug Member SoSH Member

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    1,397
    Skipping upgrades is not a good idea. Skipping security patches on any Microsoft software product installed on your device could be dangerous.
     
  3. charlieoscar

    charlieoscar Member

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    906
    Even if I never use Excel 2003 or Word 2003? I have newer versions of both of them installed.
     
  4. tonyandpals

    tonyandpals Well-Known Member Lifetime Member SoSH Member

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    5,694
    Seems like it would be a bad idea to skip the updates. I don't think you need to be actively running the software for it to possibly be exploited.
     
  5. RetractableRoof

    RetractableRoof Well-Known Member Lifetime Member SoSH Member

    Messages:
    2,080
    I can't answer the question absolutely, but offer this as someone who wrote a lot of software. Suites like Office share common frameworks and code to prevent the software from being even larger than they are. This common framework and/or code is stored in common files called a DLL that are referenced when a feature within them is needed. So Access AND Excel may both use ABC.dll and Word AND Access may both use XYZ.dll. Theoretically if there is a patch in abc.dll or xyz.dll that is important and they put it out there, you want it because Access is going to use it - even if it is labeled a Word update or Excel patch. Edit: This is in addition to any changes that might be done in code that is specific to Access itself - but that is always going to be marked an "Access update".

    All that said, modern software building often has tremendously complex build procedures that indicate all these dependencies, and they should be extremely accurate indicating which software is affected by which changes. If it doesn't say Access is affected, then in theory you don't need it.

    But you are risking your safety and workflow to a typo or an omission by whoever is managing the process, often the lowest person on the software team totem pole. That's a risk you are taking.

    Edit: Tony's point is valid though - if you've got software that isn't updated on your machine (Word/Excel 2003) and in a rush you click the old icon - you've opened/accessed an unprotected piece of software. If you aren't going to update the old Word/Excel think I might uninstall the unused parts of the old suite to prevent an accidental click causing an issue.
     
    #5 RetractableRoof, Dec 1, 2017
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2017
  6. charlieoscar

    charlieoscar Member

    Messages:
    906
    Thanks, all, I guess it's better to be safe than sorry but I hate to keep encroaching on my SSD storage space.
     
  7. santadevil

    santadevil Well-Known Member Silver Supporter SoSH Member

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    3,164
    Some decent deals on SSD's recently.
    See if you can find one on sale somewhere, I paid $110CDN for a 250GB Samsung Evo
     
  8. charlieoscar

    charlieoscar Member

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    906
    Oh, I know I could get a larger one than the 180 GB SSD I already have but the replacement would take more work than I care to undertake. I have a couple of regular drives that have a ton of space installed for data (photographs and databases) but having extra room on the C:\ drive speeds up operation.
     
  9. santadevil

    santadevil Well-Known Member Silver Supporter SoSH Member

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    3,164
    If you're using a desktop, which it sounds like, the swap is easy.
    Takes maybe 30 to 40 minutes, which includes the cloning.
    I've done 5 so far this year at my office. I guess the cloning may take a little longer in your case since the drive you would be replacing is 50% bigger, but the speed increase for the staff was worth it
     

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